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(Mental Floss)   Donruss, Fleer, Topps, and Upper Deck. Could you have recognized the differences before your mom threw out all your baseball cards?   (mentalfloss.com) divider line 27
    More: Interesting, Topps, Donruss, Fleer, baseball cards  
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1466 clicks; posted to Sports » on 20 Oct 2013 at 10:03 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



27 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-10-20 10:08:48 AM  
That brought back some nice memories. Thanks submitter.

/9
 
2013-10-20 10:09:45 AM  
That was fun, only missed 1 post 1980 set (1992 topps).  Yeah I spent a bit too much on baseball cards as a child, why are you asking.
 
2013-10-20 10:13:42 AM  
I still have all of my cards. hopefully they retain some kind of value.
 
2013-10-20 10:15:09 AM  
I suspect it will be a long time for most of the boom years, all of us collectors then remember the stories of earlier collections being tossed (which is why the old cards are valuable).
 
2013-10-20 10:17:00 AM  
I got into card collecting in the early 90's. Right when the oversaturation began. I'm pretty sure all my cards are worthless.
 
2013-10-20 10:17:47 AM  

deanis: I still have all of my cards. hopefully they retain some kind of value.


As kindling maybe. That super high gloss finish on the high end cards will practically spontaneously combust.
 
2013-10-20 10:33:45 AM  
Was a kid at the same time during the boom.  My mom still has the cards but even some of the rookie cards of now hall of famers are still only worth $20-50 at most.  With so many stories of "I had Honus Wagner's high school card but my mom threw it away" cards from my generation will never be of much value.
I used to get a pack of standard cards for around $2 or so and it would contain about 10-15 cards, then the glossy crap came out and it was like $6 for like 5 cards with bench warmers.  Thats when I got out.
 
2013-10-20 10:53:37 AM  

DemoKnite: I used to get a pack of standard cards for around $2 or so and it would contain about 10-15 cards, then the glossy crap came out and it was like $6 for like 5 cards with bench warmers.  Thats when I got out.


We were the same way, use to spend a buck per pack of 15.  After the high end cards came out, my older brother stole 20 bucks from our parents to buy 4 packs of Fleer Flair cards and ended up getting no one cool at all.  They were these really thick, glossy cards that came in a box instead of a foil package, and had a lot fewer cards per pack too.
 
2013-10-20 11:05:03 AM  
I scored 100% I collected so many cards and then one day it wasn't fun anymore. It was like any card you opened you couldn't touch and what I bought was overproduced and not worth much.

Plus some things the card companies were doing that wasn't accurate. I wish I could find the story of the guy who bought 125 cards of something when the company said only 100 were produced.
 
2013-10-20 11:33:29 AM  
I remember having that Mario Mendoza card as a kid and thinking he had an awesome sounding name, and therefore he was probably a great player.  Then I familiarized myself with baseball statistics.
 
2013-10-20 11:35:52 AM  
Donruss had the full names and only 5 seasons at a time, Fleer had that little face shot and everyone's minor league records ever, Upper Deck had the hologram logo and the pic that took up a third of the back, and Topps was the only one that did their cards on thick stock.

\wondering why Score, Bowman, Leaf, etc. not mentioned here, without RTFA....
 
2013-10-20 11:43:47 AM  
I got 7 right. I collected from 85 to 92. Kinda missed the heyday, but financed many ventures along the way via card sales. Got into gpks a few montgs before the rereleases, and made some good bank off of those too. 1985 series 1 and 2 usa only. A series one box...which sold for 12 bucks...now sells for 3000, and 4500 if they are glossy.
 
2013-10-20 11:43:52 AM  

Count_Crackula: I remember having that Mario Mendoza card as a kid and thinking he had an awesome sounding name, and therefore he was probably a great player.  Then I familiarized myself with baseball statistics.


Well, he is a benchmark.
 
2013-10-20 12:31:33 PM  

DemoKnite: Was a kid at the same time during the boom.  My mom still has the cards but even some of the rookie cards of now hall of famers are still only worth $20-50 at most.  With so many stories of "I had Honus Wagner's high school card but my mom threw it away" cards from my generation will never be of much value.
I used to get a pack of standard cards for around $2 or so and it would contain about 10-15 cards, then the glossy crap came out and it was like $6 for like 5 cards with bench warmers.  Thats when I got out.


I only collected for little while, before I met my wife and decided I liked her more.  The most I had done was a book of Barry Sanders, since he was the only reason I got into watching the Lions.  After I sold what I could, at a loss, I used the rest as BB gun targets with my son.  Never got into baseball or hockey cards, did have a few NASCAR cards which is the biggest waste of money.  NASCAR fans are the worst collectors.

/my bro has probably the biggest Eddie Belfour collection in existence, since he and his wife has been following Eddie since he played for a Saginaw minor league team
//bro is the only reason I collected at all, he is still serious about it.
///I still have a 6-pack of Earnhardt & Junior Coke bottles, no one has been interested even at a $1 per bottle
 
2013-10-20 01:23:40 PM  
Missed two, but I was there for the boom beginning in 89 and the bust a few years later. Managed to unload up to 90 percent of my stock through ebay while in grad school. The money went to food and entertainment. Made for a nice change up from ramen while studying.
 
2013-10-20 01:34:44 PM  
I could have done ok with the brands, but picking out the year? No freaking chance.
 
2013-10-20 02:19:51 PM  
The popularity of baseball cards was killed by magic the gathering and pogs. Or something.

In all seriousness, I was lucky enough to be handed down a ton of old cards from the 60s and 70s, by an uncle that didn't want them. Theyre probably in storage somewhere.
 
2013-10-20 02:57:42 PM  
Not-so-CSB:

I started collecting baseball cards in 1970. Over the next 10 years, I amassed a collection of over 2,500 cards. Then my grandfather died. My inheritance was his collection of over 10,000 baseball cards dating back to the 1940s, and included Mantles, Dimaggios (all 3), Williamses (Ted, Billy and Ken), Koufaxes, Drysdales, Robinsons (Jackie, Brooks and Frank), Aarons, Mayses, McCoveys, Fords, an NM Pete Rose rookie card, etc.

In 1989, while I was in the Army, my folks completely re-modeled the house. In doing so, they threw out and gave away a lot of stuff. My mom  GAVE my cards to a 17 year-old kid down the street. That kid sold the cards and made enough money to start a sports memorabilia business and fund his college education.

Thanks mom... I still owe you a KITB for that.

/Not-so-CSB
 
2013-10-20 03:02:22 PM  
I only got the Topps cards right.  Only because I've been collecting every Topps Factory set since 1988.  All but three are still wrapped in plastic, never opened.  I think only one of them is "worth" anything.
 
2013-10-20 03:59:11 PM  

Yes please: I could have done ok with the brands, but picking out the year? No freaking chance.


Likewise. That's what killed me. Besides, I was more into hoops from mid/late 80s to the mid 90s.
 
2013-10-20 04:39:08 PM  
Never got into baseball (Canadian here, so it was all O-Pee-Chee hockey cards as a kid), but my collecting period was during the 80s (most of which were not treated with any regard to condition or preservation) and early 90s (the height of the speculator boom), so most of my collection isn't worth much, if anything at all. I got more into Magic: the Gathering, which doesn't show signs of slowing down, although I made a point of not viewing it from an investment standpoint, otherwise it'd suck the fun out of it.
 
2013-10-20 06:48:29 PM  
71%
 
2013-10-20 06:58:39 PM  
50%.. I recognized every single one of those cards, and have about 80% of those actual cards, but memory for specific years on almost any subject is not really my thing.
 
2013-10-20 09:41:43 PM  

lack of warmth: DemoKnite: Was a kid at the same time during the boom.  My mom still has the cards but even some of the rookie cards of now hall of famers are still only worth $20-50 at most.  With so many stories of "I had Honus Wagner's high school card but my mom threw it away" cards from my generation will never be of much value.
I used to get a pack of standard cards for around $2 or so and it would contain about 10-15 cards, then the glossy crap came out and it was like $6 for like 5 cards with bench warmers.  Thats when I got out.

I only collected for little while, before I met my wife and decided I liked her more.  The most I had done was a book of Barry Sanders, since he was the only reason I got into watching the Lions.  After I sold what I could, at a loss, I used the rest as BB gun targets with my son.  Never got into baseball or hockey cards, did have a few NASCAR cards which is the biggest waste of money.  NASCAR fans are the worst collectors.

/my bro has probably the biggest Eddie Belfour collection in existence, since he and his wife has been following Eddie since he played for a Saginaw minor league team
//bro is the only reason I collected at all, he is still serious about it.
///I still have a 6-pack of Earnhardt & Junior Coke bottles, no one has been interested even at a $1 per bottle


When I was a kid I used to mail cards to players to get them to sign them...lost a lot of good cards that way.  Anyway, I mailed one to Eddie Belfour and it must have destroyed in the mail or something because I got back a different (better) card that was signed.  I always thought that was pretty cool.
 
2013-10-21 12:22:50 AM  
I got 100 percent.

I realized that I can STILL tell you what every topps set made before I stopped (1991) looks like and the major cards in each.

That is pretty sad, seeing as I cant remember my pin number for my voice mail half the time.
 
2013-10-21 12:24:49 AM  

orangehat: lack of warmth: DemoKnite: Was a kid at the same time during the boom.  My mom still has the cards but even some of the rookie cards of now hall of famers are still only worth $20-50 at most.  With so many stories of "I had Honus Wagner's high school card but my mom threw it away" cards from my generation will never be of much value.
I used to get a pack of standard cards for around $2 or so and it would contain about 10-15 cards, then the glossy crap came out and it was like $6 for like 5 cards with bench warmers.  Thats when I got out.

I only collected for little while, before I met my wife and decided I liked her more.  The most I had done was a book of Barry Sanders, since he was the only reason I got into watching the Lions.  After I sold what I could, at a loss, I used the rest as BB gun targets with my son.  Never got into baseball or hockey cards, did have a few NASCAR cards which is the biggest waste of money.  NASCAR fans are the worst collectors.

/my bro has probably the biggest Eddie Belfour collection in existence, since he and his wife has been following Eddie since he played for a Saginaw minor league team
//bro is the only reason I collected at all, he is still serious about it.
///I still have a 6-pack of Earnhardt & Junior Coke bottles, no one has been interested even at a $1 per bottle

When I was a kid I used to mail cards to players to get them to sign them...lost a lot of good cards that way.  Anyway, I mailed one to Eddie Belfour and it must have destroyed in the mail or something because I got back a different (better) card that was signed.  I always thought that was pretty cool.


Somewhere there's an autograph fan who's talking about how Eddie Belfour never returned his card.

/I got 12 right
 
2013-10-21 09:13:51 PM  

NotoriousW.O.P: orangehat: lack of warmth: DemoKnite: Was a kid at the same time during the boom.  My mom still has the cards but even some of the rookie cards of now hall of famers are still only worth $20-50 at most.  With so many stories of "I had Honus Wagner's high school card but my mom threw it away" cards from my generation will never be of much value.
I used to get a pack of standard cards for around $2 or so and it would contain about 10-15 cards, then the glossy crap came out and it was like $6 for like 5 cards with bench warmers.  Thats when I got out.

I only collected for little while, before I met my wife and decided I liked her more.  The most I had done was a book of Barry Sanders, since he was the only reason I got into watching the Lions.  After I sold what I could, at a loss, I used the rest as BB gun targets with my son.  Never got into baseball or hockey cards, did have a few NASCAR cards which is the biggest waste of money.  NASCAR fans are the worst collectors.

/my bro has probably the biggest Eddie Belfour collection in existence, since he and his wife has been following Eddie since he played for a Saginaw minor league team
//bro is the only reason I collected at all, he is still serious about it.
///I still have a 6-pack of Earnhardt & Junior Coke bottles, no one has been interested even at a $1 per bottle

When I was a kid I used to mail cards to players to get them to sign them...lost a lot of good cards that way.  Anyway, I mailed one to Eddie Belfour and it must have destroyed in the mail or something because I got back a different (better) card that was signed.  I always thought that was pretty cool.

Somewhere there's an autograph fan who's talking about how Eddie Belfour never returned his card.

/I got 12 right


I will give you $1 BILLION dollars for that card!!
 
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