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(USA Today)   The S&P 500 reaches all time high, so clearly the economy is fixed, everyone is gainfully employed, and we'll all be ordering the solid gold toilet paper holders for our new yachts   (usatoday.com) divider line 30
    More: Cool, holders, electronic trading, Hang Seng, Dow Jones Industrial Average  
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311 clicks; posted to Business » on 19 Oct 2013 at 2:22 PM (47 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



30 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-10-19 11:56:45 AM
When CNBC and Bloomberg are talking about all-time highs and ignore earnings... I get very nervous.

When USA Today is talking about it? Basically, all the worst parts of the bible.
 
2013-10-19 12:14:04 PM
Can't you feel it trickling down?
 
vpb [TotalFark]
2013-10-19 01:44:58 PM

NewportBarGuy: When CNBC and Bloomberg are talking about all-time highs and ignore earnings... I get very nervous.


Who cares about earnings?   Stock price is all that matters, it doesn't matter if the shares are actually worth anything in the long term.
 
2013-10-19 01:52:18 PM

vpb: it doesn't matter if the shares are actually worth anything in the long term.


It does if you're only investing in a retirement account with long term goals.  I care what my 401k looks like in 2040.
 
2013-10-19 02:29:55 PM
I wouldn't think solid gold toilet paper would be very absorbent, even if it were two-ply.
 
2013-10-19 02:37:30 PM
 
2013-10-19 02:37:36 PM
Where do I register for my Plutocrat hunting license?
 
2013-10-19 03:02:24 PM
Hm. Good time to sell.
 
2013-10-19 03:08:53 PM
Results not typical.
Request a perspectus.
Possible results include loss of principal.
 
2013-10-19 03:38:17 PM
how close to an all time high is it when adjusted for inflation?
that's when I'd begin to worry
 
2013-10-19 03:55:39 PM
www.lonokechurch.com
 
2013-10-19 04:08:01 PM

Prophet of Loss: [www.lonokechurch.com image 250x223]


Now THAT'S Jenga!
 
2013-10-19 04:56:07 PM

Peter von Nostrand: Can't you feel it trickling down?


Actually, if more people invested their money instead of going to [insert sporting event here], buying [insert shiny trinket of the week here], or splurging on [insert keeping up with the Jones' activity here], they would be able to take advantage of the market rise.

I guess it's easier to biatch about the rich folk.  Enjoy your cat food in retirement.
 
2013-10-19 05:47:18 PM

AngryDragon: Peter von Nostrand: Can't you feel it trickling down?

Actually, if more people invested their money instead of going to [insert sporting event here], buying [insert shiny trinket of the week here], or splurging on [insert keeping up with the Jones' activity here], they would be able to take advantage of the market rise.

I guess it's easier to biatch about the rich folk.  Enjoy your cat food in retirement.


Funny, there is an entire town in Nevada that claims the same thing.
 
2013-10-19 06:18:43 PM

Peter von Nostrand: Can't you feel it trickling down?


yea, that Trickle Down bullsh*t ole' Ronnie Raygun spewed hasn't panned out too well.

the only thing Trickling down now is cold, freedom piss down the backs of the bottom 90%.

ain't Freedom great!
 
2013-10-19 06:31:38 PM

NewportBarGuy: When CNBC and Bloomberg are talking about all-time highs and ignore earnings... I get very nervous.


Bloomberg is ignoring earnings? Just yesterday they had this article:http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2013-10-18/s-p-500-climbs-in-we ek-to-re c ord-on-debt-deal-fed-bets.html
"Of the 100 companies in the S&P 500 that have reported results so far, 70 percent have topped analysts' estimates while 55 percent have beaten revenue projections, according to data compiled by Bloomberg. "
"Profits for companies in the S&P 500 probably increased 2.5 percent during the three months while sales rose 2.2 percent, according to analysts' estimates compiled by Bloomberg."

It seems people in this thread think the market has reached a plateau and can't go any higher without horrible consequences.
 
2013-10-19 06:36:55 PM
s3.amazonaws.com
 
2013-10-19 06:51:55 PM

NewportBarGuy: When CNBC and Bloomberg are talking about all-time highs and ignore earnings... I get very nervous.

When USA Today is talking about it? Basically, all the worst parts of the bible.


All of the business media completely ignores the impact of inflation.  It's been fairly low for long enough that it's effect is subtle, but nobody on CNBC or Bloomberg EVER talks in constant dollars, all of their charts are not inflation adjusted.  Which is a joke for financial channels.  But the rubes like big numbers and new highs.
 
2013-10-19 06:52:28 PM
Shareholders doing excellently while wages stagnate. This isn't a failure in capitalism, this is capitalism working perfectly as designed.
 
2013-10-19 06:57:18 PM
My take on the price of stocks right now is that things are relatively fairly balanced, with upside potential and not much downside.  People got burned horribly twice in the past 13 years by the market, they are very gun-shy.  Which puts a huge cap on potential bubbles, people yank their money much faster once they have some profit these days.  Price/earnings ratios are below the ten year average by a slight bit and the government is not likely to do much damage to the market at least until after the 2014 election.  Things look very similar to 1997, when we had a divided Congress, a Democratic President, and were coming off of a boneheaded government shutdown by the GOP.  The next 18 months were great for the market, then things got frothy and collapsed in 2000.
 
2013-10-19 07:08:33 PM

Leader O'Cola: how close to an all time high is it when adjusted for inflation?
that's when I'd begin to worry


Back in 2000, the index was above $2000 in 2013 dollars, so it isn't quite there yet.

P/E ratio is significantly lower now, incidentally--not too far from the historical average IIRC.
 
2013-10-19 07:12:36 PM
When my father-in-law starts talking about how his stocks are doing well, I mutter, "thanks Obama."  He hates that.
 
2013-10-20 03:15:17 AM

AngryDragon: Peter von Nostrand: Can't you feel it trickling down?

Actually, if more people invested their money instead of going to [insert sporting event here], buying [insert shiny trinket of the week here], or splurging on [insert keeping up with the Jones' activity here], they would be able to take advantage of the market rise.

I guess it's easier to biatch about the rich folk.  Enjoy your cat food in retirement.


Heck, if people just put more time into researching their investments than they do the purchase of a new car they'd be so much better off. Most people sign up for their employer's 401k and never think about it again. Researching investments, to me, is damn near a second job... has been for 25+ years. So I make 3X what the guy in the next cubicle makes, and have 10X the net worth (maybe more), and he can't figure out why.
 
2013-10-20 08:05:20 AM

DrPainMD: AngryDragon: Peter von Nostrand: Can't you feel it trickling down?

Actually, if more people invested their money instead of going to [insert sporting event here], buying [insert shiny trinket of the week here], or splurging on [insert keeping up with the Jones' activity here], they would be able to take advantage of the market rise.

I guess it's easier to biatch about the rich folk.  Enjoy your cat food in retirement.

Heck, if people just put more time into researching their investments than they do the purchase of a new car they'd be so much better off. Most people sign up for their employer's 401k and never think about it again. Researching investments, to me, is damn near a second job... has been for 25+ years. So I make 3X what the guy in the next cubicle makes, and have 10X the net worth (maybe more), and he can't figure out why.


How do you respond to studies that show professional, full-time, fund-managers and investors fail to outperform random selection?
 
2013-10-20 08:38:48 AM

Fark_Guy_Rob: DrPainMD: AngryDragon: Peter von Nostrand: Can't you feel it trickling down?

Actually, if more people invested their money instead of going to [insert sporting event here], buying [insert shiny trinket of the week here], or splurging on [insert keeping up with the Jones' activity here], they would be able to take advantage of the market rise.

I guess it's easier to biatch about the rich folk.  Enjoy your cat food in retirement.

Heck, if people just put more time into researching their investments than they do the purchase of a new car they'd be so much better off. Most people sign up for their employer's 401k and never think about it again. Researching investments, to me, is damn near a second job... has been for 25+ years. So I make 3X what the guy in the next cubicle makes, and have 10X the net worth (maybe more), and he can't figure out why.

How do you respond to studies that show professional, full-time, fund-managers and investors fail to outperform random selection?


And if he's been dumping money into the market (and reinvesting) consistently for the last 25 years and the guy in the next cubicle hasn't, even by letting a retarded monkey pick his stocks he would be doing pretty well. The DJIA is currently seven and a half times higher than it was in 1988...doesn't take a huge amount of genius to let that rising tide lift your boat.
 
2013-10-20 09:22:47 AM

schief2: And if he's been dumping money into the market (and reinvesting) consistently for the last 25 years and the guy in the next cubicle hasn't, even by letting a retarded monkey pick his stocks he would be doing pretty well. The DJIA is currently seven and a half times higher than it was in 1988...doesn't take a huge amount of genius to let that rising tide lift your boat.


Yep.  Being in the market in the first place is much more important than what individual stocks you pick.  Just diversify.
 
2013-10-20 01:15:47 PM

schief2: Fark_Guy_Rob: DrPainMD: AngryDragon: Peter von Nostrand: Can't you feel it trickling down?

Actually, if more people invested their money instead of going to [insert sporting event here], buying [insert shiny trinket of the week here], or splurging on [insert keeping up with the Jones' activity here], they would be able to take advantage of the market rise.

I guess it's easier to biatch about the rich folk.  Enjoy your cat food in retirement.

Heck, if people just put more time into researching their investments than they do the purchase of a new car they'd be so much better off. Most people sign up for their employer's 401k and never think about it again. Researching investments, to me, is damn near a second job... has been for 25+ years. So I make 3X what the guy in the next cubicle makes, and have 10X the net worth (maybe more), and he can't figure out why.

How do you respond to studies that show professional, full-time, fund-managers and investors fail to outperform random selection?

And if he's been dumping money into the market (and reinvesting) consistently for the last 25 years and the guy in the next cubicle hasn't, even by letting a retarded monkey pick his stocks he would be doing pretty well. The DJIA is currently seven and a half times higher than it was in 1988...doesn't take a huge amount of genius to let that rising tide lift your boat.


Unless you liquidate those gains, it means fark-all. You could be a millionaire at breakfast and destitute by lunch.
 
2013-10-20 02:43:26 PM

Prophet of Loss: schief2: Fark_Guy_Rob: DrPainMD: AngryDragon: Peter von Nostrand: Can't you feel it trickling down?

Actually, if more people invested their money instead of going to [insert sporting event here], buying [insert shiny trinket of the week here], or splurging on [insert keeping up with the Jones' activity here], they would be able to take advantage of the market rise.

I guess it's easier to biatch about the rich folk.  Enjoy your cat food in retirement.

Heck, if people just put more time into researching their investments than they do the purchase of a new car they'd be so much better off. Most people sign up for their employer's 401k and never think about it again. Researching investments, to me, is damn near a second job... has been for 25+ years. So I make 3X what the guy in the next cubicle makes, and have 10X the net worth (maybe more), and he can't figure out why.

How do you respond to studies that show professional, full-time, fund-managers and investors fail to outperform random selection?

And if he's been dumping money into the market (and reinvesting) consistently for the last 25 years and the guy in the next cubicle hasn't, even by letting a retarded monkey pick his stocks he would be doing pretty well. The DJIA is currently seven and a half times higher than it was in 1988...doesn't take a huge amount of genius to let that rising tide lift your boat.

Unless you liquidate those gains, it means fark-all. You could be a millionaire at breakfast and destitute by lunch.


I could drop dead of a stroke tomorrow as well.  That doesn't mean I'm going to smoke, not exercise, and fark anything that moves without protection just because doing the safe (boring) thing might be pointless.

If you don't save anything at all you WILL be destitute.  I'll take the risk that my investments might not pan out.
 
2013-10-20 05:16:51 PM
The stock market is a good indicator for one thing: how well the already very/super rich are doing.  It means squat to the regular working stiff.

Yes, yes, I know, we all have tons of money tied up in the stock market and are all going to be millionaires someday, right?
 
2013-10-20 07:40:27 PM

AngryDragon: Prophet of Loss: schief2: Fark_Guy_Rob: DrPainMD: AngryDragon: Peter von Nostrand: Can't you feel it trickling down?

Actually, if more people invested their money instead of going to [insert sporting event here], buying [insert shiny trinket of the week here], or splurging on [insert keeping up with the Jones' activity here], they would be able to take advantage of the market rise.

I guess it's easier to biatch about the rich folk.  Enjoy your cat food in retirement.

Heck, if people just put more time into researching their investments than they do the purchase of a new car they'd be so much better off. Most people sign up for their employer's 401k and never think about it again. Researching investments, to me, is damn near a second job... has been for 25+ years. So I make 3X what the guy in the next cubicle makes, and have 10X the net worth (maybe more), and he can't figure out why.

How do you respond to studies that show professional, full-time, fund-managers and investors fail to outperform random selection?

And if he's been dumping money into the market (and reinvesting) consistently for the last 25 years and the guy in the next cubicle hasn't, even by letting a retarded monkey pick his stocks he would be doing pretty well. The DJIA is currently seven and a half times higher than it was in 1988...doesn't take a huge amount of genius to let that rising tide lift your boat.

Unless you liquidate those gains, it means fark-all. You could be a millionaire at breakfast and destitute by lunch.

I could drop dead of a stroke tomorrow as well.  That doesn't mean I'm going to smoke, not exercise, and fark anything that moves without protection just because doing the safe (boring) thing might be pointless.

If you don't save anything at all you WILL be destitute.  I'll take the risk that my investments might not pan out.


Its more of a point that you swimming with sharks as an expendable guppy. Sure you can make some money when times are good, but if you don't secure those gain into a liquid asset, you cannot rely on that money one bit. A whole bunch of people found this out the hard way a few years ago.
 
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