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(SFGate)   Schools adopt updated safety training in response to school shootings. And by "safety training," I mean "masked staff bursting into classrooms waving fake guns around"   (blog.sfgate.com) divider line 33
    More: Strange, school shootings, middle schools  
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1690 clicks; posted to Main » on 17 Oct 2013 at 9:33 PM (26 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



33 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-10-17 07:20:53 PM
The students that recognized the man in the mask had a free shot at being pretend heroes by grabbing a chair or some other large heavy object and beating the masked man down. That would have been a better lesson to show school districts the whole thing is a poorly thought out idea
 
2013-10-17 07:37:00 PM
But if a kid bites his Pop-tart into the shape of a gun he gets expelled.  Barking moonbat insanity.
 
2013-10-17 08:12:57 PM
School employee dresses up as fake gunman to teach students lesson

That lesson: don't drink a lot of water before class.
 
2013-10-17 08:14:10 PM

unamused: But if a kid bites his Pop-tart into the shape of a gun he gets expelled.  Barking moonbat insanity.


It's not just California. A similar thing happened in Oregon last spring. They referred to it as a "safety drill".
 
2013-10-17 08:45:54 PM
And when a student or adult not in on the gag smashes the gunman in the face with something heavy... lulz.
 
2013-10-17 09:18:52 PM
If the students had toy guns this never would have happened.
 
2013-10-17 09:24:11 PM
The employee and administration should all be suspended without pay for bringing a toy gun into the school. Zero tolerance!
 
2013-10-17 09:37:20 PM
Send the staff who were involved to Gitmo....
 
2013-10-17 09:39:56 PM
img.fark.net
 
2013-10-17 09:41:11 PM
I remember the administration doing this at our school.  They used it to practice lockdown procedures, and show the 25 or so students what to do in an emergency.  Of course, NONE of us in ALL the other 150+rooms or so got that lesson.  Maybe we were just cannon fodder.
 
2013-10-17 09:42:56 PM
Sooner or later one of these guys will get his fool head blown off.  And everyone will act all surprised.
 
2013-10-17 09:47:15 PM
Dwight Schrute approves.

img.ksl.com
 
2013-10-17 09:47:16 PM

born_yesterday: [img.fark.net image 264x191]


made brownies tonight. this is relevant to my chocolatey interests =D
 
2013-10-17 09:58:28 PM

Bathia_Mapes: It's not just California.


No one mentioned California in the article or in the thread previous to your post.

unamused: Barking moonbat insanity.


Oh, there it is. Nevermind. Carry on.
 
2013-10-17 10:06:02 PM

simrobert2001: I remember the administration doing this at our school.  They used it to practice lockdown procedures, and show the 25 or so students what to do in an emergency.  Of course, NONE of us in ALL the other 150+rooms or so got that lesson.  Maybe we were just cannon fodder.


Were the 25 students in one of the first rooms by the entrance?
 
2013-10-17 10:06:08 PM
Sounds like a story line from "It's always Sunny in Philadelphia".
 
2013-10-17 10:07:40 PM
the administration at Eastern Wayne Middle School specifically described the incident as an "enrichment lesson"

Enrichment for whom?  The nephew of the superintendent?
 
2013-10-17 10:09:37 PM

Giltric: simrobert2001: I remember the administration doing this at our school.  They used it to practice lockdown procedures, and show the 25 or so students what to do in an emergency.  Of course, NONE of us in ALL the other 150+rooms or so got that lesson.  Maybe we were just cannon fodder.

Were the 25 students in one of the first rooms by the entrance?

NO, actually.  I remember that they were almost always in one of the inner rooms.
 
2013-10-17 10:11:27 PM

simrobert2001: Giltric: simrobert2001: I remember the administration doing this at our school.  They used it to practice lockdown procedures, and show the 25 or so students what to do in an emergency.  Of course, NONE of us in ALL the other 150+rooms or so got that lesson.  Maybe we were just cannon fodder.

Were the 25 students in one of the first rooms by the entrance?
NO, actually.  I remember that they were almost always in one of the inner rooms.


Almost as if the school honestly thought: "OH, no one would EVER strike at one of the rooms close by the door. THey'll ALWAYS make it inside, THEN start shooting, LONG after he's been spotted on security cameras."
 
2013-10-17 10:13:37 PM
I moved around a lot when I was a kid, and I can remember at least twice we had something similar in class, but it was to teach about "eyewitness accounts" and how to be observant.
 
2013-10-17 10:19:26 PM
I am a teacher and we did actually have a training in our building where a "gunman" "shot" us and/or chased us out of classrooms and we practiced some more practical strategies in dealing with an armed intruder.

HOWEVER, it was a training for teachers only and all students were dismissed and required to be clear of the building, no exceptions.  Our students will get the "student" version of this training at some point yet this year, but I don't think anyone will be shooting at them.

Setting up an unannounced "gunman" coming into a classroom is just begging for a lawsuit when a student ends up having a panic attack or someone actually tries to take out the "gunman."
 
2013-10-17 10:43:42 PM

bsteiny: I am a teacher and we did actually have a training in our building where a "gunman" "shot" us and/or chased us out of classrooms and we practiced some more practical strategies in dealing with an armed intruder.

HOWEVER, it was a training for teachers only and all students were dismissed and required to be clear of the building, no exceptions.  Our students will get the "student" version of this training at some point yet this year, but I don't think anyone will be shooting at them.

Setting up an unannounced "gunman" coming into a classroom is just begging for a lawsuit when a student ends up having a panic attack or someone actually tries to take out the "gunman."


I was a teacher's aide last year and worked with HS special ed kids. Some lost their shiat during the normal lockdown drill (special tone rings over pa, everyone gathers quietly in the corner, teacher turns off lights and locks door, school admin comes by a few minutes later and rattles the door knob).

Hell, one of my students shat herself during a planned and much discussed fire drill. She probably would have a full blown panic attack, if not a seizure, if the school staged a gunman in the school drill.
 
2013-10-17 10:50:33 PM
I was in high school during Columbine and Thurston and this type of drill became a regular thing. They'd play death metal over the intercom while we had to "hide" under our desks and the teacher locked the door. Because it was so soon after the shootings, several people would freak out.
 
2013-10-17 11:25:37 PM
From the uncle of one of the kids: "In my opinion, I think the realistic events - of course I have a military background - so the more realistic you can make it, the better it seems," Collins told WRAL-TV.

Now, what's the purpose of realistic military training drills? To teach the recruits to kill their enemy when confronted with an actual combat situation. Of course, in combat training, soldiers haven't been given real weapons or live ammo, so the chances of anything bad happening are small; but not zero, as a quick Google of "military training accidents" will show.

Some day, probably sooner than later, a school will stage a "realistic safety training" that's just a bit too realistic, forgetting that some kids nowadays have actually had some kind of combat training, some know how to handle weapons, some are immigrants from war zones, etc., and one of these staff members will catch a folding metal chair upside the head or a steel ruler through the eye socket. It's as inevitable as the shootings that led to these asinine "safety trainings" in the first place.
 
2013-10-17 11:35:05 PM

Gyrfalcon: From the uncle of one of the kids: "In my opinion, I think the realistic events - of course I have a military background - so the more realistic you can make it, the better it seems," Collins told WRAL-TV.

Now, what's the purpose of realistic military training drills? To teach the recruits to kill their enemy when confronted with an actual combat situation. Of course, in combat training, soldiers haven't been given real weapons or live ammo, so the chances of anything bad happening are small; but not zero, as a quick Google of "military training accidents" will show.

Some day, probably sooner than later, a school will stage a "realistic safety training" that's just a bit too realistic, forgetting that some kids nowadays have actually had some kind of combat training, some know how to handle weapons, some are immigrants from war zones, etc., and one of these staff members will catch a folding metal chair upside the head or a steel ruler through the eye socket. It's as inevitable as the shootings that led to these asinine "safety trainings" in the first place.


Plus... THEY'RE FARKING KIDS, YOU ASSHOLE!

There's a reason we don't give ten-year-olds military training. And shouldn't be giving them unannounced "shooter" trainings!

"Of course, I have a military background"-- this uncle wouldn't happen to spend all his time in a van, filming himself throwing a football, and flirting badly with his nephew Napoleon's friends, would he?
 
2013-10-17 11:36:18 PM
*just to make sure, I was calling the uncle an asshole. Not gyrfalcon, who is in fact a pretty cool Farker.
 
2013-10-17 11:45:42 PM

eurotrader: The students that recognized the man in the mask had a free shot at being pretend heroes by grabbing a chair or some other large heavy object and beating the masked man down. That would have been a better lesson to show school districts the whole thing is a poorly thought out idea


If someone tried that at the school I went to... 50/50 chance of *boom* head shot. Course I went to Public School in the 70's.
 
2013-10-17 11:47:08 PM

brimed03: *just to make sure, I was calling the uncle an asshole. Not gyrfalcon, who is in fact a pretty cool Farker.


I got that ;)
 
2013-10-18 12:08:04 AM

lilbjorn: Sooner or later one of these guys will get his fool head blown off.  And everyone will act all surprised.


Not everyone.
 
2013-10-18 12:17:28 AM
I smell a lawsuit. Everyone wins!
 
2013-10-18 05:35:57 AM
Educators are just like doctors or plumbers: half of them are poor at what they do.

The educators who thought this up are idiots.

The real sicko, though, is the adult who aggreed to terrify young children. Play or not, he has issues.
 
2013-10-18 05:43:26 AM

bsteiny: I am a teacher and we did actually have a training in our building where a "gunman" "shot" us and/or chased us out of classrooms and we practiced some more practical strategies in dealing with an armed intruder.

HOWEVER, it was a training for teachers only and all students were dismissed and required to be clear of the building, no exceptions.  Our students will get the "student" version of this training at some point yet this year, but I don't think anyone will be shooting at them.

Setting up an unannounced "gunman" coming into a classroom is just begging for a lawsuit when a student ends up having a panic attack or someone actually tries to take out the "gunman."


If we can save just one child it's all worth it.
 
2013-10-18 09:03:14 PM

bsteiny: Setting up an unannounced "gunman" coming into a classroom is just begging for a lawsuit when a student ends up having a panic attack or someone actually tries to take out the "gunman."


It sounds like a good way to cause PTSD that can debilitate for life, too.
 
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