If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Pittsburgh Magazine)   And the latest group to be demonized as welfare queens living off the teat of the state is...the NFL?   (pittsburghmagazine.com) divider line 94
    More: Interesting, NFL, Zygi Wilf, Wilfs, Paul Brown Stadium, Vikings  
•       •       •

1467 clicks; posted to Sports » on 16 Oct 2013 at 2:17 PM (48 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



94 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all
 
2013-10-16 01:25:53 PM
This isn't new and the article is spot on.
 
2013-10-16 02:04:13 PM
Keeps the proles happy content occupied.
 
2013-10-16 02:10:39 PM

2wolves: Keeps the proles happy content occupied.


Gotta admit, our circuses are top-notch, and there's plenty of bread to go around thanks to farm subsidies.
 
2013-10-16 02:25:05 PM
I'd have thought congress was first on the list.
 
2013-10-16 02:27:27 PM
You really have to wonder why cities build lavish stadiums for the richest sports league in the world. You get what 8 or 10 regular and preseason home games. There is NO way that you ever make your money back.
 
2013-10-16 02:39:19 PM

Delawheredad: You really have to wonder why cities build lavish stadiums for the richest sports league in the world. You get what 8 or 10 regular and preseason home games. There is NO way that you ever make your money back.


Yeah, but on the plus side, they charge a lot of money for tickets, so that way the average person can't go anyway.
 
2013-10-16 02:40:21 PM
The state of Minnesota is on the hook for $348 million, while the city of Minneapolis kick in $150 million via the highest downtown sales tax in the country (hope you like $9 Coors Lights)

The downtown Minneapolis sales tax is ridiculous(13.25%...ish), but nobody, outside of the stadium itself, is selling Coors Light for anywhere near $9.
 
2013-10-16 02:43:30 PM
Tank, tank, tank, tank, tank, tank, tank, tank, ask fans for new stadium, threaten to leave, get new stadium, tank, tank, tank, tank, tank, tank, tank, tank, tank...


Sheez, is there an NFL team owner who doesn't use this strategy?
 
2013-10-16 02:46:01 PM
There's been talk of public funding in St. Louis. I would much rather the Rams leave than pay for a stadium for them. It was one thing for baseball, which is legitimately part of the pulse of the city and the stadium was 40 years old (i wasn't thrilled, but neither was I irate).

But the Rams stink, and have stunk for all but a few years a decade ago now, and their last stadium was taxpayer funded only 20 years ago. Screw. That.
 
2013-10-16 02:46:16 PM
RICH PEOPLE USE THEIR POSITION TO STEAL AS MUCH PUBLIC MONEY AS POSSIBLE.

/news at 11
 
2013-10-16 02:46:35 PM

UrukHaiGuyz: 2wolves: Keeps the proles happy content occupied.

Gotta admit, our circuses are top-notch, and there's plenty of corn bread to go around thanks to farm subsidies.


FTFAccuracy.
 
2013-10-16 02:48:10 PM

EyeballKid: Tank, tank, tank, tank, tank, tank, tank, tank, ask fans for new stadium, threaten to leave, get new stadium, tank, tank, tank, tank, tank, tank, tank, tank, tank...


Sheez, is there an NFL team owner who doesn't use this strategy?


*coughgreenbaycough*
 
2013-10-16 02:48:30 PM

Delawheredad: You really have to wonder why cities build lavish stadiums for the richest sports league in the world. You get what 8 or 10 regular and preseason home games. There is NO way that you ever make your money back.


Not true. You can make your money back if you make it a multi-use facility and fund the portion you pay with taxes on industries the stadium will improve.

For example, Cowboys Stadium is a $1.3 billion dollar stadium, which the city of Arlington chipped in $350 million for. They took out a 30 year bond on it, and according to the last set of projections it will be paid off in somewhere around 15 years. It is being paid for due to a tax on rental cars, hotels, and a half-cent sales tax - all things that improve significantly because of the stadium.

Not to mention that the stadium also does concerts, soccer games, boxing matches, etc. As a citizen of Arlington (where the stadium actually is) I couldn't be happier with it. It took a blighted, run down area and added to the list of things to do in that small area, which includes a baseball stadium, a football stadium, a theme park, and a water park.
 
2013-10-16 02:48:39 PM
They forgot the punch line.

The NFL is a 'non profit', tax exempt organization.

http://www.dailykos.com/story/2013/09/25/1241265/-Wait-the-NFL-is-a- no n-profit-organization
 
2013-10-16 02:53:38 PM

Treygreen13: Delawheredad: You really have to wonder why cities build lavish stadiums for the richest sports league in the world. You get what 8 or 10 regular and preseason home games. There is NO way that you ever make your money back.

Not true. You can make your money back if you make it a multi-use facility and fund the portion you pay with taxes on industries the stadium will improve.

For example, Cowboys Stadium is a $1.3 billion dollar stadium, which the city of Arlington chipped in $350 million for. They took out a 30 year bond on it, and according to the last set of projections it will be paid off in somewhere around 15 years. It is being paid for due to a tax on rental cars, hotels, and a half-cent sales tax - all things that improve significantly because of the stadium.

Not to mention that the stadium also does concerts, soccer games, boxing matches, etc. As a citizen of Arlington (where the stadium actually is) I couldn't be happier with it. It took a blighted, run down area and added to the list of things to do in that small area, which includes a baseball stadium, a football stadium, a theme park, and a water park.


We give Jerry Jones and the Death Star a lot of grief, but TBH, it's been much better thought out and managed than the Cowboys.
 
2013-10-16 02:57:37 PM

TommyymmoT: They forgot the punch line.

The NFL is a 'non profit', tax exempt organization.

http://www.dailykos.com/story/2013/09/25/1241265/-Wait-the-NFL-is-a- no n-profit-organization


Except for the part where they didn't: Toss in the fact that the NFL enjoys nonprofit status in the eyes of the U.S. government, and it seems almost like money laundering.
 
2013-10-16 02:58:41 PM
Terrible article filled with lies and misinformation.

Public financing for sports stadiums is definitely an issue that needs to be considered, and cost benefit analyses of previous instances should be reflected upon by any municipality considering public financing. My opinion is that it is generally not a good use of public funds.

But TFA sucks and loses all credibility early.
 
2013-10-16 02:59:40 PM

TwoBeersOneCan: RICH PEOPLE USE THEIR POSITION TO STEAL AS MUCH PUBLIC MONEY AS POSSIBLE.

/news at 11


And you know what, the "poor" people have no problem giving it to them.  Stupid voters (or the people they elect) approve these dam stadium projects which never deliver the promise economic benefit.  Tax dollars are used to build the Multi Billion dollar  sports businesses of the NFL, NBA and MLB  stadiums and arenas and then the tax payers , through their elected representatives essentially hand over the deed along with most revenue generation  items like concessions, parking, naming rights, etc. to the team owner.  This stupidity happens across party lines, both Democrats and Republicans are equally stupid on this issue.

Is LA really in more of a hell hole without an NFL team.   Is Indianapolis a better City with one?   San Antonio built the ugly Alamodome (AKA the Heneri' Cisneros Dome) Never got an NFL team now it is an outdate facility home to a barely division 1 football team (UTSA hoping they get better).  I don't even think George Straight holds his concerts there anymore.  OF course the city/tax payers got stupid and helped the Spurs build a New Arena.
 
2013-10-16 02:59:58 PM

I_Can't_Believe_it's_not_Boutros: TommyymmoT: They forgot the punch line.

The NFL is a 'non profit', tax exempt organization.

http://www.dailykos.com/story/2013/09/25/1241265/-Wait-the-NFL-is-a- no n-profit-organization

Except for the part where they didn't: Toss in the fact that the NFL enjoys nonprofit status in the eyes of the U.S. government, and it seems almost like money laundering.


The franchises must pay taxes, right? Just not the league?
 
2013-10-16 03:00:01 PM

I_Can't_Believe_it's_not_Boutros: TommyymmoT: They forgot the punch line.

The NFL is a 'non profit', tax exempt organization.

http://www.dailykos.com/story/2013/09/25/1241265/-Wait-the-NFL-is-a- no n-profit-organization

Except for the part where they didn't: Toss in the fact that the NFL enjoys nonprofit status in the eyes of the U.S. government, and it seems almost like money laundering.


The NFL is non-profit. The teams and owners that actually make the money aren't.

Huge distinction.
 
2013-10-16 03:01:58 PM

Debeo Summa Credo: Terrible article filled with lies and misinformation.

Public financing for sports stadiums is definitely an issue that needs to be considered, and cost benefit analyses of previous instances should be reflected upon by any municipality considering public financing. My opinion is that it is generally not a good use of public funds.

But TFA sucks and loses all credibility early.


A powerful, fact-based opinion you put forth there. Hard to argue with, really.
 
2013-10-16 03:02:41 PM
Even adjusting for inflation, older stadiums were super, super cheap. Before 1961 only two out of 32 stadiums cost more than $100 million in 2012 dollars: Soldier Field and the Boston Garden. There are many reasons for this (capacity, labor)...

Well, we know it wasn't capacity here.
 
2013-10-16 03:03:18 PM

EyeballKid: Tank, tank, tank, tank, tank, tank, tank, tank, ask fans for new stadium, threaten to leave, get new stadium, tank, tank, tank, tank, tank, tank, tank, tank, tank...


Sheez, is there an NFL team owner who doesn't use this strategy?


Aside from some street and sidewalk infrastructure, Bob Kraft privately financed Gillette Stadium after a huge fight from Massachusetts politicians. It was:
buy team/  inherit Bill Parcells and Drew Bledsoe, lose, meh, meh, lose superbowl, Parcells controversy, Pete Carroll meh, meh, meh, Belichick meh, ask fans for new stadium, threaten to leave/tease Hartford, lose battle against corrupt politicians who for once in their lives did the right thing (whether or not this was on purpose we'll never know), Brady, win Superbowl, move into new privately financed stadium, meh, Super bowl, Super Bowl, etc., etc.
 
2013-10-16 03:07:56 PM
Wait, so it turns out that the people that have all the money are getting more of a handout than people that don't have money? This truly is a shocker.

Next you'll tell me that the people that pay for lobbyists and politicians get laws written for their benefit more than people who don't!
 
2013-10-16 03:12:15 PM

Debeo Summa Credo: Terrible article filled with lies and misinformation.

Public financing for sports stadiums is definitely an issue that needs to be considered, and cost benefit analyses of previous instances should be reflected upon by any municipality considering public financing. My opinion is that it is generally not a good use of public funds.

But TFA sucks and loses all credibility early.


cdn.shopify.com

Until you bring facts, I'm afraid you have as much credibility as the article in question.
 
2013-10-16 03:18:09 PM

Delawheredad: You really have to wonder why cities build lavish stadiums for the richest sports league in the world. You get what 8 or 10 regular and preseason home games. There is NO way that you ever make your money back.


I'm not sure what metric you're using for "richest sports league in the world", but as far as revenue goes, the NFL makes a little less than half of what the English Premier League makes.
 
2013-10-16 03:19:29 PM
Wow, old news is so exciting.
 
2013-10-16 03:22:44 PM

xaks: Debeo Summa Credo: Terrible article filled with lies and misinformation.

Public financing for sports stadiums is definitely an issue that needs to be considered, and cost benefit analyses of previous instances should be reflected upon by any municipality considering public financing. My opinion is that it is generally not a good use of public funds.

But TFA sucks and loses all credibility early.

[cdn.shopify.com image 300x300]

Until you bring facts, I'm afraid you have as much credibility as the article in question.

Public Financing of Private Sports Stadiums

An older study looked at 12 stadium areas between 1958 and 1987 and found that professional sports don't drive economic growth. A shorter-term study looked at job growth in 46 cities from 1990 to 1994 and found that cities with major league teams grew more slowly. Even worse, taxpayers still service debt on now-demolished stadiums, including the $110 million that New Jersey still owes on the old Meadowlands and the $80 million that Seattle's King County owes on the Kingdome. And we shouldn't forget that local governments often employ property-rights-trampling eminent domain to facilitate these money-squandering projects.


Big time sports are not, strictly speaking, a free market. Because there are a limited number of Major League (or NFL or NBA) teams, the owners have unusual leverage. Post columnist and ESPN talk show host Michael Wilbon notes,

"For more than 30 years, D.C. has been a beggar. The District tried to steal other folks' teams. The city and its representatives lobbied for expansion teams. Baseball team owners used the threat of moving to D.C. as leverage to get shiny new publicly funded stadiums and stay put."

The last twenty-odd years of the National Football League provide an interesting case study:

◾1982: Oakland Raiders move to Los Angeles
◾1984: Baltimore Colts move to Indianapolis
◾1987: St. Louis Cardinals move to Phoenix
◾1993: Carolina Panthers and Jacksonville Jaguars are awarded NFL franchises for 1995
◾1995: Los Angeles Rams move to St. Louis; Los Angeles Raiders move back to Oakland
◾1996 : Cleveland Browns move to Baltimore
◾1997: Houston Oilers move to Tennessee
◾1998: Cleveland granted franchise for 1999
◾1999: New England Patriots negotiate move to Hartford to force better deal from Foxboro
◾2000: Houston awarded franchise for 2002
◾2004: Indianapolis funds expensive new stadium for Colts
As this cycle of city/stadium roulette illustrates, there is tremendous desire for a professional team. The mere threat of relocation has secured several teams better stadium deals. Several cities - Oakland, Baltimore, St. Louis, Cleveland, and Houston - that declined to pay up to keep their current teams wound up paying even more a few years later to lure other teams or secure an expansion team.

 
2013-10-16 03:23:39 PM

yelmrog: Delawheredad: You really have to wonder why cities build lavish stadiums for the richest sports league in the world. You get what 8 or 10 regular and preseason home games. There is NO way that you ever make your money back.

I'm not sure what metric you're using for "richest sports league in the world", but as far as revenue goes, the NFL makes a little less than half of what the English Premier League makes.


Keep in mind, of course, that the same post asserts that you can never ever make your money back on a stadium.
 
2013-10-16 03:24:42 PM

Treygreen13: Not true. You can make your money back if you make it a multi-use facility and fund the portion you pay with taxes on industries the stadium will improve.


Sure, but it requires competent governance from the municipality/county/state level to allocate the funds properly, the right market demand and location to even attract viable and consistent "multi-use" attractions, etc.

I can see how it can work in Dallas. There's plenty of other cities across the country hosting multiple professional sports teams however without the population base, corporate support, wealth, etc of a city like Dallas. In Seattle's case, as far as the "gentrification" aspect of a crappy area with a new stadium, SoDo where the two stadiums are currently located (and where Hansen's plan for the new arena would be) is more or less butted up against the port. I don't know how the hell an area like that can get much "nicer" than it is with constant long-haul traffic and your view of the Puget Sound always obstructed by container ships. As it is, it's already an annoying area to drive around in with the existing highway infrastructure being, um, "significantly lacking" (and it will take years of increased generated revenue to be able to even being improving it, if even possible given the topographical constraints).
 
2013-10-16 03:25:32 PM

Treygreen13: Delawheredad: You really have to wonder why cities build lavish stadiums for the richest sports league in the world. You get what 8 or 10 regular and preseason home games. There is NO way that you ever make your money back.

Not true. You can make your money back if you make it a multi-use facility and fund the portion you pay with taxes on industries the stadium will improve.

For example, Cowboys Stadium is a $1.3 billion dollar stadium, which the city of Arlington chipped in $350 million for. They took out a 30 year bond on it, and according to the last set of projections it will be paid off in somewhere around 15 years. It is being paid for due to a tax on rental cars, hotels, and a half-cent sales tax - all things that improve significantly because of the stadium.

Not to mention that the stadium also does concerts, soccer games, boxing matches, etc. As a citizen of Arlington (where the stadium actually is) I couldn't be happier with it. It took a blighted, run down area and added to the list of things to do in that small area, which includes a baseball stadium, a football stadium, a theme park, and a water park.


Also, part of the idea of it is to make auxiliary businesses business also improve, which (should) improve tax revenues.
 
2013-10-16 03:27:39 PM

RedPhoenix122: Delawheredad: You really have to wonder why cities build lavish stadiums for the richest sports league in the world. You get what 8 or 10 regular and preseason home games. There is NO way that you ever make your money back.

Yeah, but on the plus side, they charge a lot of money for tickets, so that way the average person can't go anyway.


We need to reward our best and worthiest job creators with football.
 
2013-10-16 03:29:02 PM
Corporate welfare is a-ok, subby. Cuz jobs..er..something.
 
2013-10-16 03:32:05 PM

Killer Cars: Sure, but it requires competent governance from the municipality/county/state level to allocate the funds properly, the right market demand and location to even attract viable and consistent "multi-use" attractions, etc.


Well if there's one thing we can be sure of is a lack of government competence. But Arlington is a great example of your ideal situation - a city seemingly intent on building and maintaining attractions for tourists and the local population. The only thing it really lacks is a public transportation system, but otherwise there is a huge amount of space for parking, easy access to two major highways (I-20 and I-30) and enough supporting infrastructure to efficiently house 4 major tourist attractions in a 5 mile area. Not to mention servicing two major metropolitan areas (who combine to be the 6th largest media market in the US) and housing the most popular NFL franchise with an owner who is willing to chip in a cool billion dollars so you can host a 60,000 person soccer game on a Wednesday.

But yeah, it is certainly easy to do it wrong. But that's what separates the good bean counters from the bad.
 
2013-10-16 03:34:55 PM
visa-vis?
 
2013-10-16 03:36:51 PM

Treygreen13: Killer Cars: Sure, but it requires competent governance from the municipality/county/state level to allocate the funds properly, the right market demand and location to even attract viable and consistent "multi-use" attractions, etc.

Well if there's one thing we can be sure of is a lack of government competence. But Arlington is a great example of your ideal situation - a city seemingly intent on building and maintaining attractions for tourists and the local population. The only thing it really lacks is a public transportation system, but otherwise there is a huge amount of space for parking, easy access to two major highways (I-20 and I-30) and enough supporting infrastructure to efficiently house 4 major tourist attractions in a 5 mile area. Not to mention servicing two major metropolitan areas (who combine to be the 6th largest media market in the US) and housing the most popular NFL franchise with an owner who is willing to chip in a cool billion dollars so you can host a 60,000 person soccer game on a Wednesday.

But yeah, it is certainly easy to do it wrong. But that's what separates the good bean counters from the bad.


And if you're a city that has a hundred million or two to throw into a stadium, you really should have good bean counters.
 
2013-10-16 03:41:44 PM
I love watching sports when I get the chance. I HATE paying for some billionaire to get a new farking place to play, though. Of course, I also hate all other types of corporate welfare. The worst part about baseball and football stadiums is that the last one is always "obsolete". The Diamondbacks get a roof that opens? Well then, the Cardinals get one where the roof opens AND the field moves out of the entire stadium on tracks... Next, someone's gonna insist on a teleporter that send you straight to your seat when you enter.

Farking Arizona... Cards basically got ONE lucky win against the Cowboys the Sunday before the goddamned bond election.
 
2013-10-16 03:43:00 PM

EyeballKid: Tank, tank, tank, tank, tank, tank, tank, tank, ask fans for new stadium, threaten to leave, get new stadium, tank, tank, tank, tank, tank, tank, tank, tank, tank...


Sheez, is there an NFL team owner who doesn't use this strategy?


Yeah, the Bidwills... Bill Bidwill's strategy was a little different:
Tank, tank, tank, tank, tank, tank, tank, tank, ask fans for new stadium, get lucky in one game, get new stadium, tank, tank, tank, tank, tank, tank, tank, tank, tank...
 
2013-10-16 03:47:45 PM
Wow, according to the infographic at Deadspin, Utah actually had the arena here privately funded...
 
2013-10-16 03:51:21 PM

Mikey1969: Wow, according to the infographic at Deadspin, Utah actually had the arena here privately funded...


When you have a cult/pyramid scheme exclusive to your neck of the woods, it's pretty easy to fleece the suckers when it's needed.
 
2013-10-16 03:51:33 PM

Debeo Summa Credo: I_Can't_Believe_it's_not_Boutros: TommyymmoT: They forgot the punch line.

The NFL is a 'non profit', tax exempt organization.

http://www.dailykos.com/story/2013/09/25/1241265/-Wait-the-NFL-is-a- no n-profit-organization

Except for the part where they didn't: Toss in the fact that the NFL enjoys nonprofit status in the eyes of the U.S. government, and it seems almost like money laundering.

The NFL is non-profit. The teams and owners that actually make the money aren't.

Huge distinction.


It wouldn't be a big deal if each team was not contractually obligated to contribute 10 million a year to the NFL. Since the NFL is a nonprofit, that money is a tax write off for the teams. This pot of money is used to give low interest loans to the teams for their portion of a new stadium deal.
 
2013-10-16 04:00:46 PM

Treygreen13: Keep in mind, of course, that the same post asserts that you can never ever make your money back on a stadium.


Stadiums are fine for fixing a blighted area but study after study after study shows no net economic benefit when you encompass the citywide or countywide area. Which you should of course. It's great for the guy with the restaurant across the street. For the region? Hogwash. The entire conversation is intellectually bankrupt if you don't also have a serious discussion about what economic benefit might have been derived from using that bonding capacity (which is not unlimited by the way) on building an office park or an industrial park or investing in port infrastructure, etc., you know, stuff that creates actual living wage jobs for the community at large.

The question is, should cities, counties, and states be investing in infrastructure that PRIMARILY benefits the for-profit ventures of the uber-wealthy... and the answer is, no, they should not. We should all stand together as a nation and say fark that noise. Like I say in every stadium thread - If it's such a farking awesome investment, if it's so self sufficient, and so farking awesome for the community and they will make so much money from it, why then do they not build it themselves and just keep all that huge profit for themselves? Answer - because we're farking idiots and we let them that's why. We build the palace, lease it back to them in a sweetheart deal in which they keep the lion's share of the revenue and then, when it's a burned out husk that they don;t want anymore the city gets to 'own' it again. That's how it usually goes.

What's Paul Allen now? Like fifth richest dude in the world? Seattle paid $300 million on that stadium (conservatively) and they lease it back to Paul Allen's shell corp for less than a million dollars a year. Must be nice...
 
2013-10-16 04:04:23 PM

EyeballKid: Mikey1969: Wow, according to the infographic at Deadspin, Utah actually had the arena here privately funded...

When you have a cult/pyramid scheme exclusive to your neck of the woods, it's pretty easy to fleece the suckers when it's needed.


Not really sure where the "pyramid scheme" comes into play, but just for the record, this state isn't entirely Mormon, it's actually only about 62%. But hey, when you can slap a big fat brush on people, it's fun for all... The best part is that they aren't the only religious group that gets money from its followers.
 
2013-10-16 04:06:46 PM

JohnBigBootay: The entire conversation is intellectually bankrupt if you don't also have a serious discussion about what economic benefit might have been derived from using that bonding capacity (which is not unlimited by the way) on building an office park or an industrial park or investing in port infrastructure, etc., you know, stuff that creates actual living wage jobs for the community at large.


The conversation wasn't about whether or not a stadium is the most efficient use of money, John. Cities don't build stadiums because it's efficient. If they were so worried about growth they'd be putting in more roads or bike lanes or office parks or whatever, but they're not.
 
2013-10-16 04:14:43 PM

Mikey1969: Not really sure where the "pyramid scheme" comes into play,


Some people get mad when I refer to their cult as a cult. I thought pyramid scheme was almost as accurate. Either way, its followers get fleeced for a bullshiat pie-in-the-sky dream. Just this one's started by a man whom historical records can confirm was a con man.

 

Mikey1969: but just for the record, this state isn't entirely Mormon, it's actually only about 62%.


Oh. So, just enough of an overwhelming majority to run everything in it. Got ya.

 

Mikey1969: The best part is that they aren't the only religious group that gets money from its followers.


The expression "honor among thieves" comes to mind. I've always suggested the LDS Church was one of the biggest donors to the Church of Scientology. After all, without their shenanigans, guess what institution gets a little more scrutiny?

Mikey1969: But hey, when you can slap a big fat brush on people, it's fun for all...


Go cry about it to one of your sister-wives, you delicate flower.
 
2013-10-16 04:16:11 PM

Snapper Carr: Corporate welfare is a-ok, subby. Cuz jobs..er..something.


Preach on brother:

conservative-outlooks.com

alt-energystocks.com

www.gannett-cdn.com
 
2013-10-16 04:18:01 PM

JohnBigBootay: The question is, should cities, counties, and states be investing in infrastructure that PRIMARILY benefits the for-profit ventures of the uber-wealthy... and the answer is, no, they should not.


That isn't the question at all. I wasn't responding to that assertion and wasn't making anything close to that statement.

Further, to answer your question about why owners don't just pay for it all if it's so profitable, you can ask the same question about why cities keep doing it. If nobody could ever even break even on it, (as was claimed) the next time an owner came around the cities would tell them to go pound sand until the North Tonawanda Giants play the Aberdeen Seahawks in front of 9,000 drunk locals.

I know you're really into the whole stadium argument, but I'm not going to argue whatever stupid point you want to try to assign to me.
 
2013-10-16 04:20:41 PM
Or how about we just put an excise tax on pro sports tickets and save that money to build future stadiums?
 
2013-10-16 04:27:17 PM

EyeballKid: Mikey1969: Not really sure where the "pyramid scheme" comes into play,

Some people get mad when I refer to their cult as a cult. I thought pyramid scheme was almost as accurate. Either way, its followers get fleeced for a bullshiat pie-in-the-sky dream. Just this one's started by a man whom historical records can confirm was a con man.

 Mikey1969: but just for the record, this state isn't entirely Mormon, it's actually only about 62%.

Oh. So, just enough of an overwhelming majority to run everything in it. Got ya.

 Mikey1969: The best part is that they aren't the only religious group that gets money from its followers.

The expression "honor among thieves" comes to mind. I've always suggested the LDS Church was one of the biggest donors to the Church of Scientology. After all, without their shenanigans, guess what institution gets a little more scrutiny?

Mikey1969: But hey, when you can slap a big fat brush on people, it's fun for all...

Go cry about it to one of your sister-wives, you delicate flower.


Well, at least your consistent with your jumping to conclusions, I guess. Not Mormon at all, Hell, I'm not religious at all, but go on jacking it while you re-read your witty repartee...
 
2013-10-16 04:29:27 PM

Treygreen13: Keep in mind, of course, that the same post asserts that you can never ever make your money back on a stadium.


Keep in mind, of course, that stadiums sit empty for more often than they are ever used.
 
Displayed 50 of 94 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report