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(Den Of Geek)   How Batman reflects his times   (denofgeek.com ) divider line
    More: Interesting, Batman, Bob Kane, Comics Code Authority, Dick Grayson, social commentary, adaptability, Gotham City, Seduction of the Innocent  
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4846 clicks; posted to Geek » on 16 Oct 2013 at 10:39 AM (2 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-10-16 10:43:52 AM  
So... we're just going to completely skip the 1980s and The Dark Knight Returns and Tim Burton's oeuvre?

Do the farking work, guy, or don't write the article at all.
 
2013-10-16 10:45:03 AM  
FTA: "Unfortunately, space does not allow discussion for every screen Batman in full detail."

It's not a book, dumbass.  You have all the space in the world.
 
2013-10-16 10:47:17 AM  

lamecomedian: So... we're just going to completely skip the 1980s and The Dark Knight Returns and Tim Burton's oeuvre?

Do the farking work, guy, or don't write the article at all.


I too thought that was a big omission, but he did at least touch on how much of a nutburger with extra cheese
Frank Miller is (and, I suspect, always has been):

Adapting Batman into this post-event aid was avoided, perhaps because a cloaked Gotham detective and a renowned figure of the night appearing in New York in broad daylight to help clear rubble was simply too abnormal or out of character. DC comics disaffiliated with Frank Miller's plans to bring Batman toe to toe with Osama Bin Laden in a proposed graphic novel entitled Holy Terror, Batman!.
Miller described the project as 'a piece of propaganda' in which Batman 'kicks Al-Qaeda's ass', explaining his motives being based in the fact that 'Superman punched out Hitler. So did Captain America. That's one of the things they're there for'. Opting out was a smart move by DC as when the project finally saw light over ten years after the event (with Batman replaced by The Fixer), it was described by Spencer Ackerman as 'one of the most appalling, offensive and vindictive comics of all time'.
 
2013-10-16 10:49:20 AM  
"Batman has come to reflect social concerns and changing opinions through the ages."

farm4.staticflickr.com

This just in: pop culture is influenced by contemporary events.
 
2013-10-16 10:52:06 AM  
DjangoStonereaver:

I too thought that was a big omission, but he did at least touch on how much of a nutburger with extra cheese
Frank Miller is (and, I suspect, always has been):


It's low-hanging fruit, and deviates from the (absurdly simplistic) thesis of his piece.  If he were really concerned about "space," he would've cut that section.  I mean, in an essay on Batman, why ignore one of the major works produced about the character in favor of taking a shot at an admittedly horrible comic that... didn't actually end up being about Batman at all?
 
2013-10-16 11:03:36 AM  

lamecomedian: FTA: "Unfortunately, space does not allow discussion for every screen Batman in full detail."

It's not a book, dumbass.  You have all the space in the world.


I'd have gone with 'not a piece of paper' because books can have all the space in the world too... but the point stands. Lame excuse - he most certainly could have discussed every screen Batman.
 
2013-10-16 11:23:20 AM  
weknowmemes.com
 
2013-10-16 11:34:06 AM  
The Dark Knight borrowed it's plot from 9/11?  Um...  did I watch the wrong movie?
 
2013-10-16 11:39:14 AM  

lamecomedian: So... we're just going to completely skip the 1980s and The Dark Knight Returns and Tim Burton's oeuvre?

Do the farking work, guy, or don't write the article at all.


Not to mention Batman in animation; how about a mention of how the Filmation series, Batman TAS, The Batman, Brave and the Bold, or Beware the Batman reflect their times?
 
2013-10-16 11:53:52 AM  

lamecomedian: FTA: "Unfortunately, space does not allow discussion for every screen Batman in full detail."

It's not a book, dumbass.  You have all the space in the world.


Not if you are a lazy man with a deadline. The smart thing is to have a huge glaring omission and then ask the readers to supply it. And yes, the movies made before the Nolan reboot were both a pretty big deal since they made metric assloads of money and reflect their time.
 
2013-10-16 11:54:06 AM  
They appear to be missing four out of the seven decades ostensibly under examination, there.
 
2013-10-16 11:56:01 AM  
lamecomedian:So... we're just going to completely skip the 1980s and The Dark Knight Returns and Tim Burton's oeuvre?

Do the farking work, guy, or don't write the article at all.

HeartBurnKid: Not to mention Batman in animation; how about a mention of how the Filmation series, Batman TAS, The Batman, Brave and the Bold, or Beware the Batman reflect their times?


This.  When I saw the headline, I thought at the very least the article would touch upon Burton's Batman and Batman the Animated Series.  Instead what I read was .....lacking.
 
2013-10-16 12:06:10 PM  

lamecomedian: DjangoStonereaver:

I too thought that was a big omission, but he did at least touch on how much of a nutburger with extra cheese
Frank Miller is (and, I suspect, always has been):

It's low-hanging fruit, and deviates from the (absurdly simplistic) thesis of his piece.  If he were really concerned about "space," he would've cut that section.  I mean, in an essay on Batman, why ignore one of the major works produced about the character in favor of taking a shot at an admittedly horrible comic that... didn't actually end up being about Batman at all?


I thought that maybe it was because Miller's DARK KNIGHT wasn't a cinematic adaptation, but that ignores
its influence on the Burton BATMAN, which was pretty much the template on which Nolan's BATMAN films
were based.
 
2013-10-16 12:45:41 PM  

lamecomedian: So... we're just going to completely skip the 1980s and The Dark Knight Returns and Tim Burton's oeuvre?

Do the farking work, guy, or don't write the article at all.


Came here to say this.
 
2013-10-16 12:56:37 PM  
So, basically this guy watched "Superheros: The Neverending Struggle" on PBS last night and cribbed all the notes on Batman?
 
2013-10-16 01:59:56 PM  
True.  Wasn't American Psycho a critique of 80s Wall Street culture?
 
2013-10-16 03:26:44 PM  

lamecomedian: So... we're just going to completely skip the 1980s and The Dark Knight Returns and Tim Burton's oeuvre?

Do the farking work, guy, or don't write the article at all.


Seriously, WTF? First thing that came my mind as well, lamecomedian.

gnosis301: True.  Wasn't American Psycho a critique of 80s Wall Street culture?


That is one of the popular theories. That when he calls his lawyer (IIRC) at the end confessing to everything, he was told none of that happened. It is a critique of how monstrous Wall Street execs can be, and there is no punishment for their crimes since they are simply swept under the rug. I could be remembering that slightly off, though... been well over a decade since I've seen it.
 
2013-10-16 03:38:54 PM  
Batman and Robin pretty much summed up the general terribleness of late-90s America, confident in its awesomeness and blissfully ignorant to the failure that was waiting for it just around the corner.
 
2013-10-16 04:05:56 PM  
FTA: "These references to terrorism all emit from one character - Heath Ledger's Joker. While Bale's Wayne is arguably the most suave and sophisticated playboy screen Wayne to date, Ledger's Joker is amongst the most dishevelled, insane and unstoppable enemies to ever face him. Even when he has gone to great effort to steal a large sum of money, he simply turns the situation around and begins burning it. Ledger's Joker is a self-professed 'agent of chaos'"

This bothered me in the movie. As the author says, there were a lot of parallels between terrorism and the "Dark Knight" movie. It played into the popular narrative that Al Qaeda did it essentially because they wanted to "watch the world burn," which had dramatic consequences for our foreign policy. It's not like you can't recognize both that Al Qaeda had a specific political policy agenda and their actions were unequivocally evil.
 
2013-10-16 07:11:46 PM  

gnosis301: True.  Wasn't American Psycho a critique of 80s Wall Street culture?


My roommate and I were watching American Psycho in the living room when a particularly goofy friend of mine walked in. We had him believing that "this was just the part before Bruce Wayne becomes Batman." It was two brutalized hookers later that he realized Batman wasn't in this movie at all.

Sort of like the first half of The Dark Knight Rises.
 
2013-10-17 09:42:08 AM  

Sudo_Make_Me_A_Sandwich: It's not like you can't recognize both that Al Qaeda had a specific political policy agenda and their actions were unequivocally evil.


I always just figured Bin Ladn had watched Fight Club too many times and thought it was a good idea.
 
2013-10-17 07:58:10 PM  
aznbadger.files.wordpress.com
 
2013-10-17 08:16:19 PM  
That was a weak article. WEAK.

BOOOOOOOOO!  Boooo Wendy Testaburger! BOOOOO!
 
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