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(CBS News)   One reason for the high cost of emergency hospitalization in the America? "Superusers" that are clogging the nation's emergency rooms by treating them like party rooms for any little thing that ails them   (cbsnews.com) divider line 259
    More: Interesting, Villareal, emergency rooms, San Francisco General Hospital, emergency physician, primary care physicians, MedStar Washington Hospital Center, rubber bands, American College of Emergency Physicians  
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9778 clicks; posted to Main » on 15 Oct 2013 at 10:22 PM (44 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-10-15 07:44:00 PM
But I've been assured by very serious people that our health care system is perfect as it is?
 
2013-10-15 07:47:52 PM
The actual one is paying for all the people between you and your doctor.  Yea free market!
 
2013-10-15 07:53:57 PM
I wants mah oxybamacotton an skrimps!
 
2013-10-15 07:58:38 PM
Nice article - good job mentioned the key reason there are "superusers" - lack of health insurance.  For many people, the only way to see a doctor is to go to the ER.

And no, no one gets "free" treatment at the ER.  They send a bill and the patient is responsible for his care.  Of course hospitals have a hard time collecting since lack of health insurance is generally accompanied by a lack of monetary resources.  So who pays for a good chunk of ER visits?  Everyone else.

Also, you cannot get just any kind of treatment at the ER.  Sure, if you are having a heart attack they will stabilize you, and if you have a primary care physician you might (as TFA suggests) get some needed tests.  But it's not like you can walk in and say "I have a family history of colon cancer, I'm 50 and I'd like a colonoscopy."  Well, you can say that but you ain't getting no colonoscopy.  So you don't get the preventative treatment.  Who pays for your frequent visits during your bout with colon cancer?  You know who.
 
2013-10-15 07:59:34 PM
*mentioning
 
2013-10-15 08:04:08 PM
I blame Fartbong0

Why won't he pass some sort of health care improvement act?
 
2013-10-15 08:37:41 PM
AKA "The uninsured".
 
2013-10-15 08:39:14 PM

sno man: The actual one is paying for all the people between you and your doctor.  Yea free market!


All civilized nations provide basic health care for free to everyone.
 
2013-10-15 08:44:07 PM
Free treatment in the ER?

That's the joke, right?

/EMTALA is not free.
 
2013-10-15 08:46:32 PM

hardinparamedic: Free treatment in the ER?

That's the joke, right?

/EMTALA is not free.


Don't even get me started on the ambulance ride.
 
2013-10-15 08:51:50 PM
One reason for the high cost of emergency hospitalization in the America? "Superusers" that are clogging the nations emergency rooms by treating them like party rooms for any little thing that ails them

Superusers are clogging the nation's restrooms too. Yes, I'm talking about you Derek. What you do in there after lunch is criminal.
 
2013-10-15 08:53:43 PM

Marcus Aurelius: hardinparamedic: Free treatment in the ER?

That's the joke, right?

/EMTALA is not free.

Don't even get me started on the ambulance ride.


Which in an ideal world of taxpayer funded third service EMS agencies would be free too.

Thanks Obama.
 
2013-10-15 09:01:11 PM
"Superusers are a small but expensive group: One large study conducted from 2009-2012 at a Los Angeles hospital noted that 99 percent of ER visitors come in fewer than 10 times a year, with nearly 67 percent coming in just once. But, the remaining 1 percent of visitors accounted for thousands of visits in one year."

This paragraph is completely devoid of meaning.

Most "superusers" are like me, people with chronic conditions that put them in crisis at least a couple of times a year. I have excellent insurance (thank goodness) but I have 4 neurological conditions that have me dialing 911 not infrequently. Some people are certainly using ERs when they could use a PCP but that's not really that common. Ers suck. Hospitals suck. I've discharged myself against advice from both because I knew they were only keeping me because they didn't know what to do or because I would be an interesting case for the students the next morning. No one spends six hours in an ER for something minor. (Six if you're lucky. I've spent that long just waiting to be seen and then another six for tests before being admitted.) 

I don't understand why we keep vilifying patients and championing the assholes who profit off the ones they can and try to bankrupt the ones they can't exploit.
 
2013-10-15 09:07:39 PM

Marcus Aurelius: sno man: The actual one is paying for all the people between you and your doctor.  Yea free market!

All civilized nations provide basic health care for free to everyone.


yup, I'm in one... sticking my tongue out and giving a raspberry.
 
2013-10-15 09:09:19 PM

AliceBToklasLives: Nice article - good job mention[ing] the key reason there are "superusers" - lack of health insurance.  For many people, the only way to see a doctor is to go to the ER.


I wish the author had nutted-up and said that, but I didn't see it mentioned in the article. I'm willing to be that most of those "superusers" should be going to urgent care, not ER, and would be if they had insurance. Why they don't have insurance is a different question, but if we had single-payer, SOCIALIZED health care, it wouldn't matter.
 
2013-10-15 09:12:12 PM

ginandbacon: "Superusers are a small but expensive group: One large study conducted from 2009-2012 at a Los Angeles hospital noted that 99 percent of ER visitors come in fewer than 10 times a year, with nearly 67 percent coming in just once. But, the remaining 1 percent of visitors accounted for thousands of visits in one year."

This paragraph is completely devoid of meaning.

Most "superusers" are like me, people with chronic conditions that put them in crisis at least a couple of times a year. I have excellent insurance (thank goodness) but I have 4 neurological conditions that have me dialing 911 not infrequently. Some people are certainly using ERs when they could use a PCP but that's not really that common. Ers suck. Hospitals suck. I've discharged myself against advice from both because I knew they were only keeping me because they didn't know what to do or because I would be an interesting case for the students the next morning. No one spends six hours in an ER for something minor. (Six if you're lucky. I've spent that long just waiting to be seen and then another six for tests before being admitted.) 

I don't understand why we keep vilifying patients and championing the assholes who profit off the ones they can and try to bankrupt the ones they can't exploit.


You must've missed this key sentence:

"There are patients who have serious medical conditions who see the ER as the point of access," Dorner said.
 
2013-10-15 09:14:38 PM
And yea, not free.  But not bloated full of for profit middle men that only add cost to the system.  We can do it for "free" for a tickle over half the US cost per capita, with a tenth of the per capita that should by volume, reduce cost...
 
2013-10-15 09:16:02 PM

Mitch Taylor's Bro: ginandbacon: "Superusers are a small but expensive group: One large study conducted from 2009-2012 at a Los Angeles hospital noted that 99 percent of ER visitors come in fewer than 10 times a year, with nearly 67 percent coming in just once. But, the remaining 1 percent of visitors accounted for thousands of visits in one year."

This paragraph is completely devoid of meaning.

Most "superusers" are like me, people with chronic conditions that put them in crisis at least a couple of times a year. I have excellent insurance (thank goodness) but I have 4 neurological conditions that have me dialing 911 not infrequently. Some people are certainly using ERs when they could use a PCP but that's not really that common. Ers suck. Hospitals suck. I've discharged myself against advice from both because I knew they were only keeping me because they didn't know what to do or because I would be an interesting case for the students the next morning. No one spends six hours in an ER for something minor. (Six if you're lucky. I've spent that long just waiting to be seen and then another six for tests before being admitted.) 

I don't understand why we keep vilifying patients and championing the assholes who profit off the ones they can and try to bankrupt the ones they can't exploit.

You must've missed this key sentence:

"There are patients who have serious medical conditions who see the ER as the point of access," Dorner said.


It is the point of access for those of us who have major crises. That's sort of the point of them.
 
2013-10-15 09:16:26 PM

Marcus Aurelius: sno man: The actual one is paying for all the people between you and your doctor.  Yea free market!

All civilized nations provide basic health care for free to everyone.


Americans are an uncivilized lot.
 
2013-10-15 09:22:09 PM

ginandbacon: Mitch Taylor's Bro: ginandbacon: "Superusers are a small but expensive group: One large study conducted from 2009-2012 at a Los Angeles hospital noted that 99 percent of ER visitors come in fewer than 10 times a year, with nearly 67 percent coming in just once. But, the remaining 1 percent of visitors accounted for thousands of visits in one year."

This paragraph is completely devoid of meaning.

Most "superusers" are like me, people with chronic conditions that put them in crisis at least a couple of times a year. I have excellent insurance (thank goodness) but I have 4 neurological conditions that have me dialing 911 not infrequently. Some people are certainly using ERs when they could use a PCP but that's not really that common. Ers suck. Hospitals suck. I've discharged myself against advice from both because I knew they were only keeping me because they didn't know what to do or because I would be an interesting case for the students the next morning. No one spends six hours in an ER for something minor. (Six if you're lucky. I've spent that long just waiting to be seen and then another six for tests before being admitted.) 

I don't understand why we keep vilifying patients and championing the assholes who profit off the ones they can and try to bankrupt the ones they can't exploit.

You must've missed this key sentence:

"There are patients who have serious medical conditions who see the ER as the point of access," Dorner said.

It is the point of access for those of us who have major crises. That's sort of the point of them.


You lack reading comprehension. Got it.
 
2013-10-15 09:29:35 PM
Can't we just disable root access at the admin level?
 
2013-10-15 09:30:27 PM

Mitch Taylor's Bro: ginandbacon: Mitch Taylor's Bro: ginandbacon: "Superusers are a small but expensive group: One large study conducted from 2009-2012 at a Los Angeles hospital noted that 99 percent of ER visitors come in fewer than 10 times a year, with nearly 67 percent coming in just once. But, the remaining 1 percent of visitors accounted for thousands of visits in one year."

This paragraph is completely devoid of meaning.

Most "superusers" are like me, people with chronic conditions that put them in crisis at least a couple of times a year. I have excellent insurance (thank goodness) but I have 4 neurological conditions that have me dialing 911 not infrequently. Some people are certainly using ERs when they could use a PCP but that's not really that common. Ers suck. Hospitals suck. I've discharged myself against advice from both because I knew they were only keeping me because they didn't know what to do or because I would be an interesting case for the students the next morning. No one spends six hours in an ER for something minor. (Six if you're lucky. I've spent that long just waiting to be seen and then another six for tests before being admitted.) 

I don't understand why we keep vilifying patients and championing the assholes who profit off the ones they can and try to bankrupt the ones they can't exploit.

You must've missed this key sentence:

"There are patients who have serious medical conditions who see the ER as the point of access," Dorner said.

It is the point of access for those of us who have major crises. That's sort of the point of them.

You lack reading comprehension. Got it.


How is that? Ers are absolutely a point of access if you are seriously ill. Even PCPs will tell you to go to the ER is you have symptoms they find alarming. ER doctors themselves have told me in no uncertain terms to skip calling my PCP's office and just call for an ambulance if I have serious symptoms. 

How do you think ERs should be used? If you think you are really sick, you should go to the ER. You will have ACCESS to tests and ACCESS to specialists. It's kind of why we have them.
 
2013-10-15 09:31:15 PM

GreenAdder: Can't we just disable root access at the admin level?


LOL
 
2013-10-15 09:31:44 PM

sno man: Marcus Aurelius: sno man: The actual one is paying for all the people between you and your doctor.  Yea free market!

All civilized nations provide basic health care for free to everyone.

yup, I'm in one... sticking my tongue out and giving a raspberry.


You irascible bastarge!
 
2013-10-15 09:33:32 PM

fusillade762: Marcus Aurelius: sno man: The actual one is paying for all the people between you and your doctor.  Yea free market!

All civilized nations provide basic health care for free to everyone.

Americans are an uncivilized lot.


For the most part, I cannot disagree.
 
2013-10-15 10:02:37 PM
Well, if there's one thing we know it's that the United States put a man on the moon, but healthcare can just never be fixed.

Never ever ever.
 
2013-10-15 10:12:36 PM

sno man: And yea, not free.  But not bloated full of for profit middle men that only add cost to the system.  We can do it for "free" for a tickle over half the US cost per capita, with a tenth of the per capita that should by volume, reduce cost...


Mote in my eye says what?
 
2013-10-15 10:13:57 PM

hardinparamedic: Which in an ideal world of taxpayer funded third service EMS agencies would be free too.

Thanks Obama.


God damn it, you got a free bambulance ride with the 'Bammy too?

When's my turn?
 
2013-10-15 10:19:19 PM

ginandbacon: Most "superusers" are like me, people with chronic conditions that put them in crisis at least a couple of times a year. I have excellent insurance (thank goodness) but I have 4 neurological conditions that have me dialing 911 not infrequently. Some people are certainly using ERs when they could use a PCP but that's not really that common. Ers suck. Hospitals suck. I've discharged myself against advice from both because I knew they were only keeping me because they didn't know what to do or because I would be an interesting case for the students the next morning. No one spends six hours in an ER for something minor. (Six if you're lucky. I've spent that long just waiting to be seen and then another six for tests before being admitted.)

I don't understand why we keep vilifying patients and championing the assholes who profit off the ones they can and try to bankrupt the ones they can't exploit.

You must've missed this key sentence:

"There are patients who have serious medical conditions who see the ER as the point of access," Dorner said.

It is the point of access for those of us who have major crises. That's sort of the point of them.

You lack reading comprehension. Got it.

How is that?


You start off with "most superusers are like you..." then talk about how your chronic conditions force you to go to ER a lot. Then you move into talking about how some people go to ER when they should be going to a primary care physician, but it's not that common, then say that no one goes to ER for minor stuff.

Is that accurate so far?

So I highlight the least ranty part of that paragraph, "No one spends six hours in an ER for something minor," and copypasta-ed that sentence FTFA that describes you to a "T" to point out that the article agrees with your original statement that "most superusers are like you." Maybe I should've copypasta-ed the three paragraphs that preceded it? Maybe you could go back and re-read TFA and let me know if that would've helped. Or maybe not. Christ, I remember getting into it with you on an abortion article and thinking, "geez, I guess I'm not agreeing with this person hard enough?"

For the record, my opinion on the matter is:

1. The high cost of ER care is driven by people who use them and can't pay. You claim to have "excellent" health insurance, so this does not apply you.
2. The ER cost issue is exacerbated by the fact that there are fewer ERs (and a lot fewer trauma centers) because a lot of hospitals can't justify the costs. It's a self-perpetuating cycle of fail that's impacted ER wait times AND increasing ER costs.
3. Providing a minimum amount of health care coverage for anyone who needs it (socialized medicine) would get a few people out of ER because maybe they'd see a doctor before their conditions turned chronic. Again, since you have 4 neurological conditions, I highly doubt this applies to you, either.
4. But more importantly, if we had socialized medicine, maybe we'd have more ERs and both the cost and wait times would come down.

It's not about vilifying patients; it's about fixing a broken system. TFA only talks about the patient-oriented causes...probably because that's all the studies mentioned were studying. I wish the author had mentioned the insurance aspect, but "wishing" ain't "having."
 
2013-10-15 10:25:08 PM
Jeez the 1% is at it again. Occupy Hospitals!
 
2013-10-15 10:25:18 PM
I believe the correct nomenclature is frequent flyers
 
2013-10-15 10:26:53 PM

Peter von Nostrand: I believe the correct nomenclature is frequent flyers


That's in the article, too. But using generally accepted terms doesn't generate web site traffic and ad impressions.
 
2013-10-15 10:26:57 PM
Ice water IV's for all frequent fliers.
 
2013-10-15 10:27:58 PM
Came in here to make some linux but people are just too serious right now. Mid week late night farkers need more beer.
 
2013-10-15 10:30:53 PM

AliceBToklasLives: Nice article - good job mentioned the key reason there are "superusers" - lack of health insurance.  For many people, the only way to see a doctor is to go to the ER.

And no, no one gets "free" treatment at the ER.  They send a bill and the patient is responsible for his care.  Of course hospitals have a hard time collecting since lack of health insurance is generally accompanied by a lack of monetary resources.  So who pays for a good chunk of ER visits?  Everyone else.

Also, you cannot get just any kind of treatment at the ER.  Sure, if you are having a heart attack they will stabilize you, and if you have a primary care physician you might (as TFA suggests) get some needed tests.  But it's not like you can walk in and say "I have a family history of colon cancer, I'm 50 and I'd like a colonoscopy."  Well, you can say that but you ain't getting no colonoscopy.  So you don't get the preventative treatment.  Who pays for your frequent visits during your bout with colon cancer?  You know who.


why do you hate America?
 
2013-10-15 10:32:15 PM

runescorpio: Came in here to make some linux but people are just too serious right now. Mid week late night farkers need more beer.


and less bullshiat, and more beer, and what were we talking about?
 
2013-10-15 10:34:16 PM

AliceBToklasLives: Nice article - good job mentioned the key reason there are "superusers" - lack of health insurance.  For many people, the only way to see a doctor is to go to the ER.

And no, no one gets "free" treatment at the ER.  They send a bill and the patient is responsible for his care.  Of course hospitals have a hard time collecting since lack of health insurance is generally accompanied by a lack of monetary resources.  So who pays for a good chunk of ER visits?  Everyone else.

Also, you cannot get just any kind of treatment at the ER.  Sure, if you are having a heart attack they will stabilize you, and if you have a primary care physician you might (as TFA suggests) get some needed tests.  But it's not like you can walk in and say "I have a family history of colon cancer, I'm 50 and I'd like a colonoscopy."  Well, you can say that but you ain't getting no colonoscopy.  So you don't get the preventative treatment.  Who pays for your frequent visits during your bout with colon cancer?  You know who.


If they charged less overall, everyone else would pay less. Hospitals gouge you on prices n the US.

I've gone hospitals in China that cost less than fifteen dollars for consultation and medicine. Doctors there don't drive BMWs. They don't have a hundred thou in student loan debt that their patents have to pay for. Etc.

Are the hospitals as modern? No. For example, you get X-rays instead of cat scans. But you can afford to go!

So, yeah, free riders suck, and drive up prices. But the heatlhcare bus costs way too much already in the US. Bunch of thieves.
 
2013-10-15 10:36:36 PM

Mitch Taylor's Bro: ginandbacon: Mitch Taylor's Bro: ginandbacon: "Superusers are a small but expensive group: One large study conducted from 2009-2012 at a Los Angeles hospital noted that 99 percent of ER visitors come in fewer than 10 times a year, with nearly 67 percent coming in just once. But, the remaining 1 percent of visitors accounted for thousands of visits in one year."

This paragraph is completely devoid of meaning.

Most "superusers" are like me, people with chronic conditions that put them in crisis at least a couple of times a year. I have excellent insurance (thank goodness) but I have 4 neurological conditions that have me dialing 911 not infrequently. Some people are certainly using ERs when they could use a PCP but that's not really that common. Ers suck. Hospitals suck. I've discharged myself against advice from both because I knew they were only keeping me because they didn't know what to do or because I would be an interesting case for the students the next morning. No one spends six hours in an ER for something minor. (Six if you're lucky. I've spent that long just waiting to be seen and then another six for tests before being admitted.) 

I don't understand why we keep vilifying patients and championing the assholes who profit off the ones they can and try to bankrupt the ones they can't exploit.

You must've missed this key sentence:

"There are patients who have serious medical conditions who see the ER as the point of access," Dorner said.

It is the point of access for those of us who have major crises. That's sort of the point of them.

You lack reading comprehension. Got it.


Maybe they can go to the ER to get that fixed.
 
2013-10-15 10:36:47 PM
So Subby the uninsured?

images.wikia.com

It's also not the high cost of emergency rooms, but all of healthcare.  Those uninsured drive up your health insurance costs, because someone has to pay for them.  you do via government footing the bill, or insurers passing on the costs from hospitals.

Luckily the ACA is forcing them to pay for at least some of their care if they're able, while also funneling them to much cheaper primary care instead of costly emergency care.
 
2013-10-15 10:37:36 PM

sno man: Marcus Aurelius: sno man: The actual one is paying for all the people between you and your doctor.  Yea free market!

All civilized nations provide basic health care for free to everyone.

yup, I'm in one... sticking my tongue out and giving a raspberry.


i230.photobucket.com

There's only one man who would dare give me the raspberry....
 
2013-10-15 10:37:54 PM

GreenAdder: Can't we just disable root access at the admin level?


Bad programming. The healthcare.exe requires root access.
 
2013-10-15 10:38:46 PM
Welfare/low income people are coached the following: "Go only to the ER, walk up to the desk person and say 'I cannot pay, I require Pro-Bono health care' ". This is the source for tons of spurious ER visit. From a few years in the ER, I would say probably 1/2 the traffic is pro-bono/welfare/medicare/medicaid related work.
 
2013-10-15 10:41:16 PM
worked for a major medical x ray film company based in Japan. we were the first customer, their USA division. they marked up what they sold/shipped to our warehouses.

the USA salesmen would pursue major accounts. they would give away huge dollars worth of hi tech equipment with free install and maintenance to help land a film contract. since they were stepping on the toes of a local dealer (who carried multiple brands of film & equipment) that dealer would get a cut right off the bat. if the local dealer was trained & under contract to service that equipment they would get fat dollars annually regardless if they went on site 1 time or 10 times.

the USA division marked up film and equipment sold to x-ray film & equipment dealers.

the x-ray film & equipment dealers marked up the film, equipment & service contracts they sold to every doc-in-the-box, vet, dentist, hospital, clinic, you name it.

it costs a bundle to cover the overhead of any doc-in-the-box, vet, dentist, hospital, clinic, you name it. so they mark up every x-ray sky high to cover expenses and make a profit at the end of the day.

whole lot of people making a whole lot of money.
 
2013-10-15 10:41:40 PM
Don't people already know this? I know at least one specific mother who uses the ER as her kid's clinic (ear aches, etc.) Sadly, she's Conservative last time I checked.
 
2013-10-15 10:42:36 PM

Mitch Taylor's Bro: ginandbacon: Most "superusers" are like me, people with chronic conditions that put them in crisis at least a couple of times a year. I have excellent insurance (thank goodness) but I have 4 neurological conditions that have me dialing 911 not infrequently. Some people are certainly using ERs when they could use a PCP but that's not really that common. Ers suck. Hospitals suck. I've discharged myself against advice from both because I knew they were only keeping me because they didn't know what to do or because I would be an interesting case for the students the next morning. No one spends six hours in an ER for something minor. (Six if you're lucky. I've spent that long just waiting to be seen and then another six for tests before being admitted.)

I don't understand why we keep vilifying patients and championing the assholes who profit off the ones they can and try to bankrupt the ones they can't exploit.

You must've missed this key sentence:

"There are patients who have serious medical conditions who see the ER as the point of access," Dorner said.

It is the point of access for those of us who have major crises. That's sort of the point of them.

You lack reading comprehension. Got it.

How is that?

You start off with "most superusers are like you..." then talk about how your chronic conditions force you to go to ER a lot. Then you move into talking about how some people go to ER when they should be going to a primary care physician, but it's not that common, then say that no one goes to ER for minor stuff.

Is that accurate so far?

So I highlight the least ranty part of that paragraph, "No one spends six hours in an ER for something minor," and copypasta-ed that sentence FTFA that describes you to a "T" to point out that the article agrees with your original statement that "most superusers are like you." Maybe I should've copypasta-ed the three paragraphs that preceded it? Maybe you could go back and re-read TFA and let me know if that would've helped. Or m ...


I get the feeling you and I probably have very similar goals for health care for our fellow citizens. 

I think this article sheds a slightly better light on the issue as evidenced by this quote "While they represented just .2 percent of all patients, they accounted for 4.5 percent of all emergency department visits in the region.
The new studies found that frequent users typically have serious medical issues."

http://www.healthpolicysolutions.org/2012/10/10/er-frequent-flyers-n ee d-more-care-not-less/

"Superusers" aren't really a big burden on ERs and most of them are there for a very good reason.

As I mentioned, I am really lucky. I have conditions that I have learned how to manage for the most part to keep me out of the ER and fantastic health insurance, BUT there are times when I need that critical care. I don't think anyone should think twice about seeking out that care when they need it just because the media has coined a nasty term to describe them. (Or me.) The next time I wake up on a sidewalk from low blood pressure or end up in acute renal failure after vomiting for 5 days, I will end up in the ER. And that's exactly where I should be. I could get even more graphic but it seems unnecessary. 

And I need to stress again that I am one of the lucky ones. Except for the renal failure and the pulmonary embolisms last spring, I really don't have anything to worry about. And I, unlike millions of very ill Americans, I don't have to worry about how to pay for my many trips to the ER.

And just to wind this up, I really do think you and I are probably on the same side on this issue if we just had a chance to sit down over a drink and hash it out.
 
2013-10-15 10:42:40 PM

TyrantII: Those uninsured drive up your health insurance costs


More than the healthcare lobby and their shareholders in government? America's health care industry even drives up costs in neighboring countries. The provision of health care should be a regulated, compassionate and efficient venture, not the loot-and-pillage for profits situation in the US.
 
2013-10-15 10:44:40 PM

TelJanin: Welfare/low income people are coached the following: "Go only to the ER, walk up to the desk person and say 'I cannot pay, I require Pro-Bono health care' ". This is the source for tons of spurious ER visit. From a few years in the ER, I would say probably 1/2 the traffic is pro-bono/welfare/medicare/medicaid related work.


"okay, we'll put you on our pro-bono prayer list, no charge. Hope the Lord blesses you!"

/faith-based healthcare
 
2013-10-15 10:44:43 PM
I actually read something that had contrary conclusions.  It said that while superusers clogged the system their problems were often easy and cheap to treat and were profit makers that subsidized the high cost of expensive equipment.  If emergency rooms only treated true emergencies there would be too few to offset the cost of operating the emergency room and would result in either higher costs or the closure of ERs.  The problem comes from the fact that many superusers are uninsured and thus the hospitals cannot charge as much as they would like.
 
2013-10-15 10:45:53 PM
I wish that primary doctors were in hospitals.

I don't see my primary care doctor too often because it takes a long time to get into see him, once you're there you have to wait longer than at urgent care places (not ERs), and he always has to send you to a specialist. The specialist never does anything on the first visit, or they send you somewhere else for lab work.

It would be nice if you could see your primary care doctor in a hospital, get any lab work you need at the same time, and if you're referred to a specialist, have that specialist at the same hospital and not start from square one again.

Even for more chronic things, I tend to go to my urgent care because they have a lab there and it's much faster to be seen (usually less than 15 minutes) compared to waiting up to 4 hours for a scheduled appointment with your primary care doctor. I then usually e-mail those lab results to my primary care doctor and communicate that way. I do have a great primary care doctor; he's just way overworked (especially compared to the specialists) and he has no equipment to do any testing in his office.
 
2013-10-15 10:47:17 PM

TelJanin: Welfare/low income people are coached the following: "Go only to the ER, walk up to the desk person and say 'I cannot pay, I require Pro-Bono health care' ". This is the source for tons of spurious ER visit. From a few years in the ER, I would say probably 1/2 the traffic is pro-bono/welfare/medicare/medicaid related work.


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