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(Ars Technica)   Founder of Rhapsody is absolutely delighted that his publisher is selling his novel for 99 cents. "Having watched the American music industry bleed out half of its revenues over 10 years, I sure don't want publishing to do the same"   (arstechnica.com) divider line 92
    More: Interesting, Rhapsody, Year Zero, Rob Reid, music industry, Random House  
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3675 clicks; posted to Main » on 15 Oct 2013 at 3:14 PM (41 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



92 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-10-15 03:03:27 PM
Better a small check than no check at all
 
2013-10-15 03:17:26 PM

Langston: Better a small check than no check at all


Why else check the mail box anymore?
 
2013-10-15 03:21:31 PM
I was with him until...

As if the only way to properly honor that one Chumbawumba song (yes, it was that long ago...) was to charge $15.99 to get it glued to 11 other songs in a full-length CD. Wrong. What truly devalued music was requiring the downloading public to pirate it rather than purchase it for five long years.

Tubthumper was by a hefty margin the worst song on that album, the rest of it is actually fun to listen to and don't make you want to stab your eyes out.
 
2013-10-15 03:22:09 PM

NkThrasher: Tubthumper was by a hefty margin the worst song on that album, the rest of it is actually fun to listen to and don't doesn't make you want to stab your eyes out.


FTFM
 
2013-10-15 03:24:30 PM
Rob Reid is a novelist, entrepreneur, and music industry expert.

Um, huh.

I don't know how to break it to the "music is old and stupid and should be free but software is holy and you should always buy it so I can have nice things" IT crowd, but, for all of the pissing and moaning about how new, emerging artists go unnoticed and how boring and cookie cutter repetitive most new music is, they seem to overlook the fact that nothing survives unless it moves money around and if you write, play, record, mix, produce and distribute musical recordings, the quality is gonna pretty much suck if the people doing it can't pay the rent.

You can romanticize an industry you know nothing about from your armchair next to the 2 TB of sh*t you glommed up off of torrents and limewire 5 years ago, but the fact of the matter is, the cream isn't going to rise to the top anymore because the only thing that works in the Western world is when people vote with their wallets.  Enjoy your 600.00 Lady Gaga tickets and don't forget to buy a T-Shirt from that "awesome band that played at that club the other night that you can't understand why they aren't like super mega famous" so they can put gas in the van.
 
2013-10-15 03:25:18 PM

Langston: Better a small check than no check at all


Pearl Jam used to play that tune. Not anymore

http://www.ticketmaster.com/Pearl-Jam-tickets/artist/735836
 
2013-10-15 03:27:46 PM
He talked about it with Leo Laporte on TWiT, and it was a good discussion (Jerry Pournelle was on, and had a few things to say, of course).  I don't think he was being biatchy about it.

He did marry Morgan Webb, so his life isn't too bad.
 
2013-10-15 03:29:29 PM
The old "Unknown writer promotes his work by essentially giving it away" schtick with mumbo jumbo about copyright in the internet age.

Cory Doctorow did this and became rather well known even though his writing sucks, and I bet Rob Reid's book also sucks.

Years ago it was common when a new radio station came on the air they would self-promote as being "advertisement free" and wait a few months to get an audience that they could charge hefty advertising rates for.
 
2013-10-15 03:30:17 PM

NkThrasher: Tubthumper was by a hefty margin the worst song on that album, the rest of it is actually fun to listen to and don't make you want to stab your eyes out.


Yes, your opinion, which apparently was not shared by all the people who helped Tubthumper chart, is definitely objectively and completely correct.
 
2013-10-15 03:33:23 PM

uber humper: Langston: Better a small check than no check at all

Pearl Jam used to play that tune. Not anymore

http://www.ticketmaster.com/Pearl-Jam-tickets/artist/735836


Eh, that's okay, they haven't produced anything worth listening to for quite some time.
 
2013-10-15 03:34:23 PM

Cynicism101: NkThrasher: Tubthumper was by a hefty margin the worst song on that album, the rest of it is actually fun to listen to and don't make you want to stab your eyes out.

Yes, your opinion, which apparently was not shared by all the people who helped Tubthumper chart, is definitely objectively and completely correct.


Apt handle.  Playing it up to match or are you really just that grouchy?  ( Or potentially participating in national grouch day  http://muppet.wikia.com/wiki/National_Grouch_Day )
 
2013-10-15 03:38:36 PM
About half the time i go to buy an e-book I just say F it and order a real one, since on Amazon physical books somehow cost less than e-books.  Including shipping.  And they can't make you turn off a real book during take-off and landing.
 
2013-10-15 03:38:46 PM

HairBolus: The old "Unknown writer promotes his work by essentially giving it away" schtick with mumbo jumbo about copyright in the internet age.

Cory Doctorow did this and became rather well known even though his writing sucks, and I bet Rob Reid's book also sucks.

Years ago it was common when a new radio station came on the air they would self-promote as being "advertisement free" and wait a few months to get an audience that they could charge hefty advertising rates for.


Yea, it's not a novel idea, take a look at  the titles for kindle for $0.99. It only makes sense for an unknown to give away or charge very little for a product. I think it's great.

To me Doctorow is a YA author, and I read it with that in mind.
 
2013-10-15 03:40:18 PM
More importantly: Spotify or Rhapsody?
 
2013-10-15 03:42:10 PM

goolump: uber humper: Langston: Better a small check than no check at all

Pearl Jam used to play that tune. Not anymore

http://www.ticketmaster.com/Pearl-Jam-tickets/artist/735836

Eh, that's okay, they haven't produced anything worth listening to for quite some time.


I was watching a YouTube video of a recent PJ  concert. I was a little embarrassed for them and their 30 to 40somthing y/o fans decked out in grunge. These are the 90's version of the Summer of Love hippies who never grew up.
 
2013-10-15 03:42:30 PM

uber humper: Langston: Better a small check than no check at all

Pearl Jam used to play that tune. Not anymore

http://www.ticketmaster.com/Pearl-Jam-tickets/artist/735836


They're still around? It always amazes me when I find out that groups that were big while I was in high school a long long time ago are still going. Who are their fans these days? People who never grew up from high school and have been following the same band for three decades? Or has the band grown up with their audience and now sings about sending their kids to college? Or is a group of 50 year old guys somehow still relevant to kids in high school discovering their music for the first time?
 
2013-10-15 03:44:47 PM

Target Builder: uber humper: Langston: Better a small check than no check at all

Pearl Jam used to play that tune. Not anymore

http://www.ticketmaster.com/Pearl-Jam-tickets/artist/735836

They're still around? It always amazes me when I find out that groups that were big while I was in high school a long long time ago are still going. Who are their fans these days? People who never grew up from high school and have been following the same band for three decades? Or has the band grown up with their audience and now sings about sending their kids to college? Or is a group of 50 year old guys somehow still relevant to kids in high school discovering their music for the first time?


haha.  For the answer look at my post 20 seconds ahead of yours.
 
2013-10-15 03:48:21 PM
uber humper:

haha.  For the answer look at my post 20 seconds ahead of yours.

I need to refresh before posting.

So... Peter Pans.

:(
 
2013-10-15 03:49:13 PM

Target Builder: They're still around? It always amazes me when I find out that groups that were big while I was in high school a long long time ago are still going. Who are their fans these days?


Well, I think it has something to do with good music not being tied to whatever the kewl trendz0rs is, this week, by people who actually just like music.

In other words,

wwwrollingstones.wpengine.netdna-cdn.com

img.dailymail.co.uk

You should only stop making music if you run out of things to say and only stop playing other people's music when t doesn't groove you anymore or you can't pick up your instrument.

Cause it's about the music, oddly.
 
2013-10-15 03:53:18 PM
Publishers mostly working hard to let him down.
 
2013-10-15 03:54:08 PM

Target Builder: uber humper:

haha.  For the answer look at my post 20 seconds ahead of yours.

I need to refresh before posting.

So... Peter Pans.

:(


No, no. I was surprised it was practically a simulpost

No Peter Pans, but I'd imagine there were pixie cuts (I still kinda like pixie cuts).
 
2013-10-15 03:54:15 PM

bunner: Rob Reid is a novelist, entrepreneur, and music industry expert.

Um, huh.

I don't know how to break it to the "music is old and stupid and should be free but software is holy and you should always buy it so I can have nice things" IT crowd, but, for all of the pissing and moaning about how new, emerging artists go unnoticed and how boring and cookie cutter repetitive most new music is, they seem to overlook the fact that nothing survives unless it moves money around and if you write, play, record, mix, produce and distribute musical recordings, the quality is gonna pretty much suck if the people doing it can't pay the rent.

You can romanticize an industry you know nothing about from your armchair next to the 2 TB of sh*t you glommed up off of torrents and limewire 5 years ago, but the fact of the matter is, the cream isn't going to rise to the top anymore because the only thing that works in the Western world is when people vote with their wallets.  Enjoy your 600.00 Lady Gaga tickets and don't forget to buy a T-Shirt from that "awesome band that played at that club the other night that you can't understand why they aren't like super mega famous" so they can put gas in the van.


New technology fundamentally changed the industry, and they hurt themselves a great deal, and continue to do so to an extent, but fighting it instead of embracing it.

I agree with you that musicians, studio techs, etc, need to earn a living.  I agree with you that music should be made available for purchase both physically and digitally.  I also believe that file sharing for personal use should be completely legal, and that it wouldn't hurt the overall industry.

The studies that have been done show that those who use file sharing services actually buy MORE music than those who don't.  Many people use it as a way of trying out new things, seeing if they like it, and then buying albums or songs to support bands that they appreciate.  They might not buy copies of everything they download, but they wouldn't have paid for most of it in the first place, and many of them will buy things they were exposed to via free download that they never would have known about to buy in the first place.


As far as e-book pricing goes, I like the idea of 99 cents, though I don't think they have to go that low.  Oftentimes e-books are priced at the same price, or near the price, of hardcovers, and that's ridiculous.  Price them at $3-$6, the same a paperback from day one, and sales will go way up.
 
2013-10-15 03:56:04 PM
Coders are not the new rock stars

Rock stars are the new rock stars, or the old rock stars.  Things that have a purchase upon culture tend to develop histories.

Coders are the new coders.

Everybody stop trying to staple rock and roll to their 1337 Sun SPARC rigs and cheeseburgers and tennis shoes and maybe the music will get a bit better when everybody starts doing what they do and getting paid.
 
2013-10-15 03:56:18 PM

bunner: Target Builder: They're still around? It always amazes me when I find out that groups that were big while I was in high school a long long time ago are still going. Who are their fans these days?

Well, I think it has something to do with good music not being tied to whatever the kewl trendz0rs is, this week, by people who actually just like music.

In other words,

[wwwrollingstones.wpengine.netdna-cdn.com image 825x660]

[img.dailymail.co.uk image 468x663]

You should only stop making music if you run out of things to say and only stop playing other people's music when t doesn't groove you anymore or you can't pick up your instrument.

Cause it's about the music, oddly.


Heh. That's funny. Because you said what you said and then posted a picture of a bunch of funeral directors who haven't put out a cumulative cd worth decent material in nearly a quarter century
 
2013-10-15 04:01:12 PM

bunner: Rob Reid is a novelist, entrepreneur, and music industry expert.

Um, huh.

I don't know how to break it to the "music is old and stupid and should be free but software is holy and you should always buy it so I can have nice things" IT crowd, but, for all of the pissing and moaning about how new, emerging artists go unnoticed and how boring and cookie cutter repetitive most new music is, they seem to overlook the fact that nothing survives unless it moves money around and if you write, play, record, mix, produce and distribute musical recordings, the quality is gonna pretty much suck if the people doing it can't pay the rent.

You can romanticize an industry you know nothing about from your armchair next to the 2 TB of sh*t you glommed up off of torrents and limewire 5 years ago, but the fact of the matter is, the cream isn't going to rise to the top anymore because the only thing that works in the Western world is when people vote with their wallets.  Enjoy your 600.00 Lady Gaga tickets and don't forget to buy a T-Shirt from that "awesome band that played at that club the other night that you can't understand why they aren't like super mega famous" so they can put gas in the van.


Meh.

Music is better now than it was before. Decades before 99% of the music I listened was major label. Now, it is probably around 50%. There is more variety and tons and tons of information and samples available.

With youtube, smaller artists can have videos (cheaply produced). Some bands use kickstarter for funding. There are always avenues if you want it.

The only thing I don't get is why bands still produce filler songs. People are just going to delete the crappy songs off their playlists or not buy them if they are buying song by song. I wish the holdover notion that an album of 45-60 minute of music has to be released would go away. A brilliant song probably does more for an indie band than an album of mediocre songs.
 
2013-10-15 04:01:12 PM

bunner: Coders are not the new rock stars

Rock stars are the new rock stars, or the old rock stars.  Things that have a purchase upon culture tend to develop histories.

Coders are the new coders.

Everybody stop trying to staple rock and roll to their 1337 Sun SPARC rigs and cheeseburgers and tennis shoes and maybe the music will get a bit better when everybody starts doing what they do and getting paid.


Jesus mary and joseph with the getting paid whine. There's nothing any less just about the way musicians are compensated compared to the world at large. A few get lucky, most don't. People pay for music what it's worth to them just like anything else.
 
2013-10-15 04:01:33 PM

TuteTibiImperes: fighting it instead of embracing it.


That sounds all very rosy, but the fact of the matter is that "embracing" 0 1 data technology for recordings makes them absolutely cost prohibitive as anything but a hobby.  And we all know how quality shifts when hobbyists start running the show. The only thing keeping people from downloading a new Kia and GE freezers is nobody has invented a transporter yet.  Data is endlessly malleable.  This makes it a great editing platform and also makes anything ported to it endlessly and losslessly replicable and of very questionable veracity.  Nobody ever checks to see if both sides of the sword are sharpened before they start swinging.
 
2013-10-15 04:02:56 PM

CruJones: About half the time i go to buy an e-book I just say F it and order a real one, since on Amazon physical books somehow cost less than e-books.  Including shipping.  And they can't make you turn off a real book during take-off and landing.


I haven't seen too many cases of that since the DOJ came down hard on the publishers that colluded with Apple to keep prices high. Kindle prices have gotten a lot more competitive lately, and I'm finding good stuff on sale for $2-3 all the time.
 
2013-10-15 04:03:06 PM

mr0x: Music is better now than it was before.


All subjective, but I'm glad you're finding new stuff.
 
2013-10-15 04:03:19 PM

mr0x: Meh.

Music is better now than it was before. Decades before 99% of the music I listened was major label. Now, it is probably around 50%. There is more variety and tons and tons of information and samples available.


Could not agree more. It's a hell of a lot more difficult to sell a million records. But there's a fark ton more people paying the bills playing music than there ever was with the old label system. Anyone who can't see this is blind.
 
2013-10-15 04:08:00 PM
Don't worry folks, Clear Channel and Simon Cowell will tell you what want to listen to on your morning drive, and around dinner time on the teevee.
 
2013-10-15 04:09:34 PM

bunner: TuteTibiImperes: fighting it instead of embracing it.

That sounds all very rosy, but the fact of the matter is that "embracing" 0 1 data technology for recordings makes them absolutely cost prohibitive as anything but a hobby.  And we all know how quality shifts when hobbyists start running the show. The only thing keeping people from downloading a new Kia and GE freezers is nobody has invented a transporter yet.  Data is endlessly malleable.  This makes it a great editing platform and also makes anything ported to it endlessly and losslessly replicable and of very questionable veracity.  Nobody ever checks to see if both sides of the sword are sharpened before they start swinging.


You're assuming that just because people could download for free that they'd stop paying for it.  Granted, some would, but some wouldn't.  There are also other income streams that artists could look to - touring, merchandise, and licensing their music for use in TV, Movies, and commercials.
 
2013-10-15 04:10:32 PM

EdNortonsTwin: Don't worry folks, Clear Channel and Simon Cowell will tell you what want to listen to on your morning drive, and around dinner time on the teevee.


"Everything is a competition now.  People watch those shows where people have to compete and the panel acts like douchebags."

"What are the focus group numbers?"

"Off the charts.  People love to watch people either blossom or fall on their ass and they don't care which."

"Find me some nobodies who want to be famous and some already semi-famous douchbags and then call Advertising sales."
 
2013-10-15 04:13:23 PM

TuteTibiImperes: - touring, merchandise, and licensing their music for use in TV, Movies, and commercials.


Yeah.

That's true.

You can, like, put up video and get lots of hits.  They don't pay anything, but.. hits.

But nobody ever wrote and recorded a brilliant, life changing record while being a part time T-Shirt salsesperson or trying to find a way to more effectively sell cheeseburgers with a piano.  If they did, it didn't end up in my collection.  Can you e-mail me a zipped copy?  *snort*       :  )
 
2013-10-15 04:14:08 PM

EdNortonsTwin: Don't worry folks, Clear Channel and Simon Cowell will tell you what want to listen to on your morning drive, and around dinner time on the teevee.


Radio, TV? WTF gramps?
 
2013-10-15 04:14:29 PM
All the bullshiat in that article and I'm the Weeners on this:

He's also a xenobiologist with a specialty in interstellar copyright.

Interstellar copyright? Xarxon 5, please cease and desist further distibution of the colon map resulting from the anal probe of John Q. Nobody from Bumfark, Arkansas.  Mr. Nobody has not authorized distibution in any medium except digital video.  Further distribution will result in a class action suit by all similarly situated anal probees and protracted litigation.
 
2013-10-15 04:14:51 PM

bunner: EdNortonsTwin: Don't worry folks, Clear Channel and Simon Cowell will tell you what want to listen to on your morning drive, and around dinner time on the teevee.

"Everything is a competition now.  People watch those shows where people have to compete and the panel acts like douchebags."

"What are the focus group numbers?"

"Off the charts.  People love to watch people either blossom or fall on their ass and they don't care which."

"Find me some nobodies who want to be famous and some already semi-famous douchbags and then call Advertising sales."


Somebody needs to bite a birds head-off and spit it on these peoples' laps.
 
2013-10-15 04:15:29 PM
NkThrasher:

Tubthumper was by a hefty margin the worst song on that album, the rest of it is actually fun to listen to and don't make you want to stab your eyes out.

I take a whiskey drink
I take a chocolate drink
and when I have to pee
I use the kitchen sink!
I sing the song that reminds me I'm a urinating guy.
 
2013-10-15 04:16:05 PM

uber humper: Radio, TV? WTF gramps?


They're media distribution pushcast platforms that generate billions in revenue a year.  Mostly for people who couldn't make fridge art and have very nice cars.
 
2013-10-15 04:18:55 PM

bunner: uber humper: Radio, TV? WTF gramps?

They're media distribution pushcast platforms that generate billions in revenue a year.  Mostly for people who couldn't make fridge art and have very nice cars.


Shall I guess how many gold records you have on your wall, because I'm thinking it's more than a few...
 
2013-10-15 04:19:53 PM

bunner: uber humper: Radio, TV? WTF gramps?

They're media distribution pushcast platforms that generate billions in revenue a year.  Mostly for people who couldn't make fridge art and have very nice cars.


Both as dead an they just don't know it (or know any better).  For TV: the billions in revenue a year is wasted.  Very few commercials are being watched.

Radio is on its last generation of listeners.
 
2013-10-15 04:20:26 PM

bunner: TuteTibiImperes: - touring, merchandise, and licensing their music for use in TV, Movies, and commercials.

Yeah.

That's true.

You can, like, put up video and get lots of hits.  They don't pay anything, but.. hits.

But nobody ever wrote and recorded a brilliant, life changing record while being a part time T-Shirt salsesperson or trying to find a way to more effectively sell cheeseburgers with a piano.  If they did, it didn't end up in my collection.  Can you e-mail me a zipped copy?  *snort*       :  )


Since I didn't mention online videos as a means of profit generation, I don't see what your point is.  It can, however, be great for building name recognition.  A band can start out, as many do, as a group of people with no name recognition playing the local scene.  Most of them likely have day jobs, whether selling t-shirts, flipping burgers, whatever.

In the old model they'd have to keep playing and hope for a label or talent scout to take notice.  Now they can take their music to the people themselves.  If they get a few million hits on YouTube and start getting a following on their channel they can use that to advertise to their fans where their shows will be.  They can start playing larger venues and making more money playing them.  They can sell their band t-shirts directly to the people, as well as selling albums directly to the people.  Maybe at that point they will get picked up by a label and be able to sell even more albums as their music shows up on store shelves.  Maybe an ad exec hears their tune and thinks it would be great on the campaign he's working on for a new car, or a director hears it and thinks it would be perfect in the soundtrack to his new film, boom, even more profit opportunity.

Album sales are one way to make money, and unrestricted file sharing for personal use might make a dent in them, or it might expose more people and lead to more legitimate sales.  Even if it did lead to a reduction in album sales, that isn't the only revenue stream a band has.
 
2013-10-15 04:21:57 PM

bunner: TuteTibiImperes: - touring, merchandise, and licensing their music for use in TV, Movies, and commercials.

Yeah.

That's true.

You can, like, put up video and get lots of hits.  They don't pay anything, but.. hits.

But nobody ever wrote and recorded a brilliant, life changing record while being a part time T-Shirt salsesperson or trying to find a way to more effectively sell cheeseburgers with a piano.  If they did, it didn't end up in my collection.  Can you e-mail me a zipped copy?  *snort*       :  )


There's a lot of popular YouTube channels that rake in thousands of dollars in real money, thanks to the ads. That crappy Friday song, for example, made $20k from the views.
 
2013-10-15 04:23:43 PM

EdNortonsTwin: bunner: uber humper: Radio, TV? WTF gramps?

They're media distribution pushcast platforms that generate billions in revenue a year.  Mostly for people who couldn't make fridge art and have very nice cars.

Shall I guess how many gold records you have on your wall, because I'm thinking it's more than a few...


I mix live shows, got one tonight, actually, records, demos and live sound I have a film score coming up.  I'm a singer / songwriter, I record and mix my own stuff and I've been doing this a while.  Like, decades.  And I can flat out tell you that Digital Audio Workstations are the most friendly and useful editing platforms ever.  Hands down.  They blow everything else out of the water.  And digital is a seriously piss poor recording and reproduction platform.  And everything you port to it can be globally distributed for free in about 7 hours of seeding.  And that pretty much IS the state of the "industry"
 
2013-10-15 04:25:14 PM

Mad_Radhu: There's a lot of popular YouTube channels that rake in thousands of dollars in real money, thanks to the ads. That crappy Friday song, for example, made $20k from the views.


And other YouTube channels being sold for nice sums.
 
2013-10-15 04:25:59 PM

Mad_Radhu: There's a lot of popular YouTube channels that rake in thousands of dollars in real money, thanks to the ads. That crappy Friday song, for example, made $20k from the views.


Which is about break even for a record made in an actual, useful studio with good acoustics, gear and competent engineers.  All of which could be handily stored on a playback device, sans ads, for anybody who wants to hear it at their own whim, for 99¢ a song.  Which is about what a 45 cost 50 years ago.  Inflation.  How does it work?
 
2013-10-15 04:27:48 PM

bunner: And everything you port to it can be globally distributed for free in about 7 hours of seeding. And that pretty much IS the state of the "industry"


The young whippersnappers seem to be making a nice go of it this way. Things change. There's still an 'industry', you just don't have to blow one of like 17 people to participate in it these days.
 
2013-10-15 04:29:04 PM

uber humper: goolump: uber humper: Langston: Better a small check than no check at all

Pearl Jam used to play that tune. Not anymore

http://www.ticketmaster.com/Pearl-Jam-tickets/artist/735836

Eh, that's okay, they haven't produced anything worth listening to for quite some time.

I was watching a YouTube video of a recent PJ  concert. I was a little embarrassed for them and their 30 to 40somthing y/o fans decked out in grunge. These are the 90's version of the Summer of Love hippies who never grew up.


"Decked out in grunge"?? WTF does that even mean?

I bet these 30-40 something PJ fans were wearing jeans and t-shirts. How awful...slackers!

What do you recommend, boat shoes and khakis, I presume?
 
2013-10-15 04:29:41 PM
"Welcome to my restaurant.  You can buy any meal you like, take it home and eat it forever, any time you want for a 99¢ tip."

"Wow, you are greedy.  Food should be free."

"It costs a lot to get, prepare, cook and we have great recipes and gas and electricity cost money, too."

"Yeah, whatever.  I'm gonna get a 7.00 dirty martini and tip the bartender with the hot ass a fiver cause, hot ass."
 
2013-10-15 04:33:12 PM

bunner: EdNortonsTwin: bunner: uber humper: Radio, TV? WTF gramps?

They're media distribution pushcast platforms that generate billions in revenue a year.  Mostly for people who couldn't make fridge art and have very nice cars.

Shall I guess how many gold records you have on your wall, because I'm thinking it's more than a few...

I mix live shows, got one tonight, actually, records, demos and live sound I have a film score coming up.  I'm a singer / songwriter, I record and mix my own stuff and I've been doing this a while.  Like, decades.  And I can flat out tell you that Digital Audio Workstations are the most friendly and useful editing platforms ever.  Hands down.  They blow everything else out of the water.  And digital is a seriously piss poor recording and reproduction platform.  And everything you port to it can be globally distributed for free in about 7 hours of seeding.  And that pretty much IS the state of the "industry"


I quit recording/playing/touring in bands years ago, but quit so i wouldn't...um....die.


I scored an M-Audio recorder and some good mics - need some basic software to record a number of songs I mysteriously wrote over the past year.  Any suggestions? I'll actually buy the software and not download it...because I care damnit!  :-)
 
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