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(Mother Jones)   In appreciation of Ada Lovelace Day, the Victorian-era mathematical genius, here are eight inventions by women that dudes got credit for   (motherjones.com) divider line 66
    More: Interesting, Ada Lovelace, Victorian, Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, inventions, nuclear fissions, double helix, Parker Brothers, Babbage  
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4938 clicks; posted to Geek » on 15 Oct 2013 at 5:47 PM (41 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-10-15 04:27:54 PM
What software engineer does not know the name of Ada Lovelace?
How many in the general public know the name Charles Babbage, or Alan Turing?

I'm struggling to understand any sense in which Ada Lovelace has been "erased".

i.imgur.com
 
2013-10-15 04:34:57 PM
starcasm.net
 
2013-10-15 04:38:14 PM
Regarding Rosalind Franklin, here is an account that suggests the story we here of Rosalind Franklin is not nearly as simple or black and white as we are told:

http://www.butterfliesandwheels.org/2010/scientists-anonymous/
 
2013-10-15 05:22:18 PM
photos1.blogger.com

/yeah, I know, but close enough
 
2013-10-15 05:42:31 PM
www.myconfinedspace.com
 
2013-10-15 05:53:04 PM
Ada Lovelace was smexy as hell, and yes, I know who she is, as well as Charles Babbage.

I'll take my titties and go home, though, so that the testosterone can dominate society.

/pouts
 
2013-10-15 05:58:29 PM
I'm happy to say I am distantly related to the Countess.
 
2013-10-15 05:59:28 PM
Article fails for not mentioning which woman invented the grilled cheese sammich.
 
2013-10-15 05:59:54 PM
"Margaret Knight, inventor of the paper bag machine"

heddalettuce.com
 
2013-10-15 06:06:05 PM
Punch cards were invented for looms? No wonder Ada has such terrible string handling.
 
2013-10-15 06:07:08 PM
'Martha Coston, signal flares: Coston was officially listed as "administratix" on the 1961 patent that revolutionized communication between US Navy vessels.'

1961 sounds kinda late for a signal flare patent.

Hold on, Wikipedia says on April 5, 1859, she was granted U.S. Patent number 23,536 for a pyrotechnic night signal and code system.
 
2013-10-15 06:08:55 PM
I'm sorry, but "hypertext fiction" is not an invention.
 
2013-10-15 06:13:50 PM

jaytkay: 'Martha Coston, signal flares: Coston was officially listed as "administratix" on the 1961 patent that revolutionized communication between US Navy vessels.'

1961 sounds kinda late for a signal flare patent.

Hold on, Wikipedia says on April 5, 1859, she was granted U.S. Patent number 23,536 for a pyrotechnic night signal and code system.


I'm pretty sure the Navy was using radio by the 1960s.
 
2013-10-15 06:16:47 PM

RoyBatty: Regarding Rosalind Franklin, here is an account that suggests the story we here of Rosalind Franklin is not nearly as simple or black and white as we are told:

http://www.butterfliesandwheels.org/2010/scientists-anonymous/


Yeah, the whole dead people can't win a Nobel Prize may have been the reason she didn't win a Nobel Prize.
 
2013-10-15 06:33:14 PM
www.harkavagrant.com
 
2013-10-15 06:36:34 PM

some_beer_drinker: [www.myconfinedspace.com image 500x375]


Fake. Definitely a woman's handwriting. And when you're equally as smart as someone else, how would you know if they were stupid?
 
2013-10-15 06:49:50 PM
Missing: sammiches
 
2013-10-15 06:51:01 PM

Stone Meadow: Article fails for not mentioning which woman invented the grilled cheese sammich.


dammit
 
2013-10-15 07:10:37 PM
I always liked that the actress Hedy Lamarr was good at acting, very pretty, and held a bunch of patents including frequency hopping. And that she was the cover model for CorelDraw.
 
2013-10-15 07:18:03 PM
Reading the Wikipedia section on Ada Lovelace, there seems to be some dispute about her contribution of "writing the first program" and that Babbage had already done it, but that what Ada Lovelace did was to make a more complex program.

Personally, I'd rather see Grace Murray Hopper acknowledged, the woman who created the language that COBOL was based on. I know people hate on COBOL today, but it was picked up commercially for many good reasons and helped to see computers adopted widely by business.
 
2013-10-15 07:18:38 PM

skinink: I always liked that the actress Hedy Lamarr was good at acting, very pretty, and held a bunch of patents including frequency hopping. And that she was the cover model for CorelDraw.


"Hedley."
 
2013-10-15 07:31:56 PM
Rosalind Franklin, discovery of the DNA double helix

Nope.

Not even a little bit.

Science does not work that way, being the lab tech that performs a verification measurement for someone else does not make you the person that "discovered" it, especially since, the way diffractometry of this type works, she wouldn't have been able to work out fark-all without the model on hand in this case.

Would her name be on the paper if it were published today?  Absolutely, third+ author.  But that's only because there's been a really big push since the '80's or so to make sure everyone involved even tangentally gets credit on projects, since back in the day it wasn't unusual for a paper to just be listed as the work of the corresponding author (usually the PI's  adviser) with the person doing the actual work not on there at all.  She was just one of about half a dozen people that'd be credited today that typically wouldn't at the time.

Would she be eligible for the Nobel if the paper was published today?  Nope.  Third authors don't generally get a slice of that one.

There apparently  were some interpersonal issues that had Crick, especially, specifically keeping her out of the references, he actually wrote about them in his autobiography.  But it was the usual academic politics, not anything terribly special, and it'd be nice if we stopped pretending this was some sort of monstrous injustice because she was a woman... that's bullshiat, and everyone familiar with the actual field knows it's bullshiat.

//Bit of a pet peeve on this one.
 
2013-10-15 07:36:11 PM

jaytkay: 'Martha Coston, signal flares: Coston was officially listed as "administratix" on the 1961 patent that revolutionized communication between US Navy vessels.'

1961 sounds kinda late for a signal flare patent.

Hold on, Wikipedia says on April 5, 1859, she was granted U.S. Patent number 23,536 for a pyrotechnic night signal and code system.


Perhaps women can't proofread?

/I keed. Most copyeditors are women.
 
2013-10-15 07:47:23 PM

skinink: I always liked that the actress Hedy Lamarr was good at acting, very pretty, and held a bunch of patents including frequency hopping. And that she was the cover model for CorelDraw.


I always liked how she did nude scenes and faked an orgasm on film as early as 1933, myself. But yeah, the torpedo stuff was cool, also.

SFW, merely suggestive: http://vimeo.com/62124101
 
2013-10-15 08:00:12 PM

farkeruk: Reading the Wikipedia section on Ada Lovelace, there seems to be some dispute about her contribution of "writing the first program" and that Babbage had already done it, but that what Ada Lovelace did was to make a more complex program.

Personally, I'd rather see Grace Murray Hopper acknowledged, the woman who created the language that COBOL was based on. I know people hate on COBOL today, but it was picked up commercially for many good reasons and helped to see computers adopted widely by business.


It's not COBOL itself that was the noteworthy bit; she invented the compiler as we know it. COBOL was just an unfortunate early use of the concept.
 
2013-10-15 08:01:01 PM
blogs.seacoastonline.com

Recommended reading...
 
2013-10-15 08:02:49 PM
As someone who is re-learning calculus and statistics after countless decades of mental cobwebs forming in his brain, can I just say that I hate hate hate mathematical geniuses.

hate hate hate
 
2013-10-15 08:03:26 PM
WHAT THE FARK IS UP WITH THE AUTOPLAY AD ON THIS PAGE, BIATCHES?
 
2013-10-15 08:13:44 PM
Know Ada, but came for the Linda Lovelace/Harry Reems reference. Happily surprised.
 
2013-10-15 08:15:33 PM
here're
 
2013-10-15 08:17:26 PM
Wow, a whole eight!
 
2013-10-15 08:20:34 PM

Jim_Callahan: Rosalind Franklin, discovery of the DNA double helix

Nope.

Not even a little bit.

Science does not work that way, being the lab tech that performs a verification measurement for someone else does not make you the person that "discovered" it, especially since, the way diffractometry of this type works, she wouldn't have been able to work out fark-all without the model on hand in this case.

Would her name be on the paper if it were published today?  Absolutely, third+ author.  But that's only because there's been a really big push since the '80's or so to make sure everyone involved even tangentally gets credit on projects, since back in the day it wasn't unusual for a paper to just be listed as the work of the corresponding author (usually the PI's  adviser) with the person doing the actual work not on there at all.  She was just one of about half a dozen people that'd be credited today that typically wouldn't at the time.

Would she be eligible for the Nobel if the paper was published today?  Nope.  Third authors don't generally get a slice of that one.

There apparently  were some interpersonal issues that had Crick, especially, specifically keeping her out of the references, he actually wrote about them in his autobiography.  But it was the usual academic politics, not anything terribly special, and it'd be nice if we stopped pretending this was some sort of monstrous injustice because she was a woman... that's bullshiat, and everyone familiar with the actual field knows it's bullshiat.

//Bit of a pet peeve on this one.


Eh. I honestly consider it a thing of the times; people are all up in arms to show how progressive they are, and how mad they are about 'womens rights' because the government is being run by a bunch of farking cavemen following retarded semi-sharia law and basically just going 'BUT JEBUS SAID' and then spewing whatever hate-propaganda will get them re-elected.

And those are the liberals.
 
2013-10-15 08:24:43 PM

farkeruk: Reading the Wikipedia section on Ada Lovelace, there seems to be some dispute about her contribution of "writing the first program" and that Babbage had already done it, but that what Ada Lovelace did was to make a more complex program.

Personally, I'd rather see Grace Murray Hopper acknowledged, the woman who created the language that COBOL was based on. I know people hate on COBOL today, but it was picked up commercially for many good reasons and helped to see computers adopted widely by business.


The fark? How the fark could they miss Grace Hopper?? *goes to RTFA*

Ahhh. I see. It's inventions by women that were stolen by the evil mens. Or something. It's why I don't see Marie Curie there... Hold up. She SHOULD be there. Cripes. Whatever.

Aaaanyhow, I'm all for female empowerment and suchlike, but these pieces bug me. I'd rather read about what a stone cold workaholic Marie Curie was, or how utterly awesome Grace Hopper was than to hear about some woman who got jerked around like any number of men did, but now it's special because she's a girl.
 
2013-10-15 08:31:21 PM
FTFA:
Candace Pert, opioid receptor: When Pert, then a graduate student at Johns Hopkins, protested that her professor, Dr. Solomon Snyder, had received an award for her discovery of the receptor allows opiates to lock into the brain, Snyder's response was curt: "That's how the game is played." Pert protested in a formal letter to the award committee ("As a graduate student who played a key role in initiating the research and following it up") and then, having thoroughly revolutionized neuroscience, got back to work. She was working toward a more effective treatment of Alzheimer's when she died in September.

What TFA pretends is that awards stem from singular contributions, when they don't. Almost all big scientific awards are essentially lifetime achievement awards, which is why nobody ever wins them twice (Sanger excepted). Sure, Candace did one big thing, but is was Sol's lab that it, along with about a billion other things, happened in. When they give the award they "settle" on a rationale to give the award. It is all pretense, and Sol was quite right to just point out that that is how the game is played.

When I was a graduate student, I made some molecules that are now involved in clinical trials, etc. Nobody had ever thought to make these, and I was the only one to characterize them. If something big comes from it, who gets the credit? My P.I.
 
2013-10-15 09:16:26 PM
delia-derbyshire.net
 
2013-10-15 10:04:37 PM

farkeruk: Reading the Wikipedia section on Ada Lovelace, there seems to be some dispute about her contribution of "writing the first program" and that Babbage had already done it, but that what Ada Lovelace did was to make a more complex program.


It's hard to know the truth of the relationship, but it does seem like there might have been a hint of Babbage humoring the pretensions of a wealthy benefactor in order to make sure the funding kept coming.
 
2013-10-15 10:06:30 PM

cretinbob: [delia-derbyshire.net image 528x640]



That was an interesting GIS, thank you.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8NPJ6GMXM3E
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Delia_Derbyshire
 
2013-10-15 10:23:20 PM
I find science women sexy.


/FSILF
 
2013-10-15 10:25:14 PM

FrancoFile: [blogs.seacoastonline.com image 286x475]

Recommended reading...


I have an autographed first edition of that.
If
 
2013-10-15 10:32:19 PM
Lady Sandwich: sammiches
 
2013-10-15 10:45:12 PM

Skyrmion: farkeruk: Reading the Wikipedia section on Ada Lovelace, there seems to be some dispute about her contribution of "writing the first program" and that Babbage had already done it, but that what Ada Lovelace did was to make a more complex program.

It's hard to know the truth of the relationship, but it does seem like there might have been a hint of Babbage humoring the pretensions of a wealthy benefactor in order to make sure the funding kept coming.


You know he was tapping that.
 
2013-10-15 11:04:18 PM

Valiente: skinink: I always liked that the actress Hedy Lamarr was good at acting, very pretty, and held a bunch of patents including frequency hopping. And that she was the cover model for CorelDraw.

I always liked how she did nude scenes and faked an orgasm on film as early as 1933, myself. But yeah, the torpedo stuff was cool, also.

SFW, merely suggestive: http://vimeo.com/62124101




THATS where ZZ Top got the idea for the pearl necklace song.
 
2013-10-15 11:16:06 PM

RoyBatty: What software engineer does not know the name of Ada Lovelace?
How many in the general public know the name Charles Babbage, or Alan Turing?

I'm struggling to understand any sense in which Ada Lovelace has been "erased".

img.fark.net


with Text_To; use Text_To
  procedure hello is
     begin
     put("Do tell.");
 end hello
 
2013-10-15 11:24:06 PM

HotIgneous Intruder: WHAT THE FARK IS UP WITH THE AUTOPLAY AD ON THIS PAGE, BIATCHES?


You might want to consider blocking ads.
 
2013-10-15 11:41:44 PM

whatshisname: Lady Sandwich: sammiches


Difficulty: It was Earl of Sandwich(a dude)
 
2013-10-16 12:49:18 AM

Aidan: farkeruk: Reading the Wikipedia section on Ada Lovelace, there seems to be some dispute about her contribution of "writing the first program" and that Babbage had already done it, but that what Ada Lovelace did was to make a more complex program.

Personally, I'd rather see Grace Murray Hopper acknowledged, the woman who created the language that COBOL was based on. I know people hate on COBOL today, but it was picked up commercially for many good reasons and helped to see computers adopted widely by business.

The fark? How the fark could they miss Grace Hopper?? *goes to RTFA*

Ahhh. I see. It's inventions by women that were stolen by the evil mens. Or something. It's why I don't see Marie Curie there... Hold up. She SHOULD be there. Cripes. Whatever.

Aaaanyhow, I'm all for female empowerment and suchlike, but these pieces bug me. I'd rather read about what a stone cold workaholic Marie Curie was, or how utterly awesome Grace Hopper was than to hear about some woman who got jerked around like any number of men did, but now it's special because she's a girl.


Yeah, this was a little feminazi manhating for me, and I'm a card-carrying feminist. It's along the "you're not helping" theme. If you want to celebrate women, then celebrate women, no need to wail on men at the same time.
 
2013-10-16 01:13:24 AM
Opioid receptors aren't an "invention".

Details like that is why broads only earn $0.70 on the dollar.
 
2013-10-16 02:29:52 AM

Gordon Bennett: RoyBatty: What software engineer does not know the name of Ada Lovelace?
How many in the general public know the name Charles Babbage, or Alan Turing?

I'm struggling to understand any sense in which Ada Lovelace has been "erased".

[img.fark.net image 647x788]

with Text_To; use Text_To
  procedure hello is
     begin
     put("Do tell.");
 end hello


I think it demonstrates the poor research and the agenda driven reporting of Mother Jones that they couldn't discover that the very male oriented DoD in 1979, 34 years ago, named a programming language after Ada Lovelace, and that since then Ada has been used in the Space Shuttle, in Apache Helicopters, in almost every DoD software program and throughout the software field:

Because of Ada's safety-critical support features, it is now used not only for military applications, but also in commercial projects where a software bug can have severe consequences, e.g. avionics and air traffic control, commercial rockets (e.g. Ariane 4 and 5), satellites and other space systems, railway transport and banking.[7] For example, the fly-by-wire system software in the Boeing 777 was written in Ada. The Canadian Automated Air Traffic System was written in 1 million lines of Ada (SLOC count). It featured advanced distributed processing, a distributed Ada database, and object-oriented design. Ada is also used in other air traffic systems, e.g. the UK's next-generation Interim Future Area Control Tools Support (iFACTS) air traffic control system is designed and implemented using SPARK Ada.[13] It is also used in the French TVM in-cab signalling system on the TGV high speed rail system, and the metro suburban trains in Paris, London, Hong Kong and New York City.[7][14]

Imagine how shiatty your reporter and editor AND fact checker has to be to overlook that.

So glad I dropped my subscription to MoJo years ago. What a total rag.
 
2013-10-16 02:39:39 AM
 
2013-10-16 04:06:48 AM

Skyrmion: It's hard to know the truth of the relationship, but it does seem like there might have been a hint of Babbage humoring the pretensions of a wealthy benefactor in order to make sure the funding kept coming.


Exactly. Whereas no-one disputes the contribution of Hopper.

The work of Babbage was basically a scientific dead-end. It's of archaeological interest and not much else. No-one built a difference engine until a few years ago, none of the people like Von Neumann or Turing used it in their work. The pianola was probably more influential.
 
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