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(NYPost)   Dramatic new video for the world's highest skydive: From the edge of space, here's Austrian Felix Baumgartner stepping off once again   (nypost.com) divider line 29
    More: Followup, Baumgartner, mountain rescuers, edge of space  
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3429 clicks; posted to Video » on 15 Oct 2013 at 11:46 AM (26 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



29 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-10-15 10:47:16 AM
It lacks something without the audio of the 80 year old talking him out of his panic and fear like a patient grandfather getting a small child to get into a swimming pool
 
2013-10-15 10:55:05 AM
Watch that first step.
It's a doozey.
 
2013-10-15 11:21:55 AM
Instrumentation on his left forearm was placed very badly.  Why not a heads-up display?
 
2013-10-15 12:00:30 PM

2wolves: Instrumentation on his left forearm was placed very badly.  Why not a heads-up display?


Probably concerned with it being less readable because of unfavorable light conditions, or fog, or vomit
 
2013-10-15 12:21:34 PM
Whats the top number in the biomed?
 
2013-10-15 12:27:40 PM
Dramatic


blog.angelatung.com
 
2013-10-15 12:36:26 PM

unitednihilists: Whats the top number in the biomed?


Almost 200 at one point.
 
2013-10-15 01:08:25 PM
I liked the gif with the Japanese cat jumping off the capsule better.
 
2013-10-15 01:11:15 PM
The top number is his pulse: beats per minute.

Can someone explain the g readings? I don't understand the radial display at all at the start of the video when he is standing on the platform the lower left pane is saying he is experiencing 1 vert g, and the radial display shows a white dot one unit below the center of the graph, and at the end when he is standing on the ground the lower left pane says he is experiencing -1 vert g and the radial display shows a white dot in the same place, one unit below the center of the graph.

How is his vert g on a platform stable in the atmosphere at 127,850 1 g, on a stable descent at 5280 feet -0.9 g, and standing on the ground -1 g? I would have thought each should be either 1g or -1g, you pick.

Also, what axis are the lat/long g forces in relationship to? I think long is an axis from his feet through his head.

How does one read the radial display?


It is interesting that his max gs are never very high but the largest component is when he is spinning.
 
2013-10-15 01:47:42 PM
For the life of me I can't figure out who sponsored that video......anyone?....if only they dropped a subtle hint.....
 
2013-10-15 02:23:13 PM
All the work that went in that for a nine minute ride...easier to wait in line at Disneyland.
 
2013-10-15 03:08:07 PM
Joseph Kittinger. The original.
 
2013-10-15 03:23:20 PM

RoyBatty: The top number is his pulse: beats per minute.

Can someone explain the g readings? I don't understand the radial display at all at the start of the video when he is standing on the platform the lower left pane is saying he is experiencing 1 vert g, and the radial display shows a white dot one unit below the center of the graph, and at the end when he is standing on the ground the lower left pane says he is experiencing -1 vert g and the radial display shows a white dot in the same place, one unit below the center of the graph.

How is his vert g on a platform stable in the atmosphere at 127,850 1 g, on a stable descent at 5280 feet -0.9 g, and standing on the ground -1 g? I would have thought each should be either 1g or -1g, you pick.

Also, what axis are the lat/long g forces in relationship to? I think long is an axis from his feet through his head.

How does one read the radial display?


It is interesting that his max gs are never very high but the largest component is when he is spinning.


Watch the radial display before he jumps.  It shows 1 g down, meaning "normal" gravity.  As soon as he jumps, the dot centers, meaning he's at essentially 0 g.  As the (thin!) atmosphere slows his acceleration, it goes above the center, and of course the side-to-side motion of the dot is the g forces due to his spinning.

There are 3 different G meters in the lower left window, VERT, LAT, and LONG.  I assume those stand for vertical, lateral (ie., side to side), and longitudinal (forward and back along the length of his body).

As soon as he pops the chute, vertical goes into negative territory and stays that way.

I'm not sure why there is what appears to be a sign change on the data in the lower left view but not on the circular display.  Perhaps the display is "corrected" data.
 
2013-10-15 03:35:39 PM

dittybopper: RoyBatty: The top number is his pulse: beats per minute.

Can someone explain the g readings? I don't understand the radial display at all at the start of the video when he is standing on the platform the lower left pane is saying he is experiencing 1 vert g, and the radial display shows a white dot one unit below the center of the graph, and at the end when he is standing on the ground the lower left pane says he is experiencing -1 vert g and the radial display shows a white dot in the same place, one unit below the center of the graph.

How is his vert g on a platform stable in the atmosphere at 127,850 1 g, on a stable descent at 5280 feet -0.9 g, and standing on the ground -1 g? I would have thought each should be either 1g or -1g, you pick.

Also, what axis are the lat/long g forces in relationship to? I think long is an axis from his feet through his head.

How does one read the radial display?


It is interesting that his max gs are never very high but the largest component is when he is spinning.

Watch the radial display before he jumps.  It shows 1 g down, meaning "normal" gravity.  As soon as he jumps, the dot centers, meaning he's at essentially 0 g.  As the (thin!) atmosphere slows his acceleration, it goes above the center, and of course the side-to-side motion of the dot is the g forces due to his spinning.

There are 3 different G meters in the lower left window, VERT, LAT, and LONG.  I assume those stand for vertical, lateral (ie., side to side), and longitudinal (forward and back along the length of his body).

As soon as he pops the chute, vertical goes into negative territory and stays that way.

I'm not sure why there is what appears to be a sign change on the data in the lower left view but not on the circular display.  Perhaps the display is "corrected" data.


One thing I think I see is that "vert" is an earth based axis, but long is a body based axis, so as his body changes orientation relative to the earth long can be of different sizes and amplitudes from the vert measurement, example is shortly after the beginning where he is perhaps not falling flat in a free fall but actually diving as I think can be seen from the camera showing his feet and the darkness above him.

(Re: the sign change, I am willing to half-heartedly accept an explanation that the g meter means nothing and the display means nothing until he starts his dive and that's when it is actually turned on and running.)
 
2013-10-15 04:00:06 PM

RoyBatty: One thing I think I see is that "vert" is an earth based axis, but long is a body based axis, so as his body changes orientation relative to the earth long can be of different sizes and amplitudes from the vert measurement, example is shortly after the beginning where he is perhaps not falling flat in a free fall but actually diving as I think can be seen from the camera showing his feet and the darkness above him.

(Re: the sign change, I am willing to half-heartedly accept an explanation that the g meter means nothing and the display means nothing until he starts his dive and that's when it is actually turned on and running.)


Yeah, that's basically what I was getting at.

An alternative is that the LAT and LONG accelerations are actually based on latitude and longitude, I suppose, which would explain why the LONG, which is at about 0.1 doesn't correspond with the vertical 1 at the start, when presumably they *SHOULD* match, as he's vertical.
 
2013-10-15 04:17:40 PM

dittybopper: RoyBatty: One thing I think I see is that "vert" is an earth based axis, but long is a body based axis, so as his body changes orientation relative to the earth long can be of different sizes and amplitudes from the vert measurement, example is shortly after the beginning where he is perhaps not falling flat in a free fall but actually diving as I think can be seen from the camera showing his feet and the darkness above him.

(Re: the sign change, I am willing to half-heartedly accept an explanation that the g meter means nothing and the display means nothing until he starts his dive and that's when it is actually turned on and running.)

Yeah, that's basically what I was getting at.

An alternative is that the LAT and LONG accelerations are actually based on latitude and longitude, I suppose, which would explain why the LONG, which is at about 0.1 doesn't correspond with the vertical 1 at the start, when presumably they *SHOULD* match, as he's vertical.


I think lat is just side to side, shoulder to shoulder, left to right accelerations.  At first glance it doesn't seem to do much at least not nearly as dramatically as long. Who knows.
 
2013-10-15 04:38:23 PM
Do I hear a sonic boom at 761 MPH, or is that just air? Jump to 40 seconds and watch airspeed.  When he hits the red line it gets louder for a second.
 
2013-10-15 05:08:13 PM
Usually I don't like songs set to various videos, but this one needs to be set to
Dayvan Cowboy to properly appreciate.  (Saw one of his previous videos set
to Dayvan Cowboy and it was sublime)
 
2013-10-15 11:36:36 PM
All that NASA tech just to have him bash NASA once he got on the ground. All respect I had for him went out the window when he did that.
 
2013-10-16 12:12:36 AM
img.gawkerassets.com

/oblig
 
2013-10-16 02:29:45 AM
I wonder how much he got paid to do this, or if he earned money from doing the talk show circuit...
 
2013-10-16 04:14:38 AM
What's fun is to just watch the altitude and speed, at first the speed just keeps going up just super fast then it levels off and then at a certain point it starts going down and keeps going down, even though he's maintaining the same position. It's awesome getting to see the experience of falling into an ever thickening atmosphere that way.
 
2013-10-16 04:15:33 AM

Wolf892: I wonder how much he got paid to do this, or if he earned money from doing the talk show circuit...


Well Red Bull covered the millions of dollars it took to develop everything, test it and then actually do it.
 
2013-10-16 06:41:51 AM

MadMattressMack: All that NASA tech just to have him bash NASA once he got on the ground. All respect I had for him went out the window when he did that.


That wasn't NASA tech.  Remember, NASA never made anything for itself.  It mostly contracted out to private companies to develop the technology.     The suit used by Mercury astronauts was initially developed by a private company for the Navy to use in high altitude fighters, for example, and U-2 pilots were wearing a form of space suit back when NASA was still NACA, and that was just an evolution of the suit Wiley Post wore for high altitude flights back in the mid-1930's.
 
2013-10-16 09:40:58 AM
Just another asshole on the internet who cant hold his phone still enough to take a decent video
 
2013-10-16 09:48:34 AM
We watched this during my son's first birthday. I was telling his older brother to pay attention, that this has never been done. The moment Baumgartner jumped and started spinning, I thought for sure we were about to watch a man die, and that I had made the worst parenting decision ever.
 
2013-10-16 10:42:09 AM
Meh. The was pretty cool last year, but what has he done lately?
 
2013-10-16 11:34:48 AM

dittybopper: MadMattressMack: All that NASA tech just to have him bash NASA once he got on the ground. All respect I had for him went out the window when he did that.

That wasn't NASA tech.  Remember, NASA never made anything for itself.  It mostly contracted out to private companies to develop the technology.     The suit used by Mercury astronauts was initially developed by a private company for the Navy to use in high altitude fighters, for example, and U-2 pilots were wearing a form of space suit back when NASA was still NACA, and that was just an evolution of the suit Wiley Post wore for high altitude flights back in the mid-1930's.


To be fair, the vast majority of government entities don't do their own manufacturing. But the AAF/AF, Navy and NACA/NASA did fund and participate in the development and production of the tech he was using. Without those agencies and their money / work he'd be struggling over 14,000'.
 
2013-10-16 06:52:32 PM
Please let it be a snuff film.


/dammit.
 
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