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(Fast Company)   For $99, company will check your DNA and tell you how you will die. Frankie "The Fist" Pinasco will tell you for free   (fastcompany.com) divider line 19
    More: Misc, DNA, Anne Wojcicki, yahoo answers, Health Affairs, genetic counselors, genetic variant, Transfinite number, Lululemon  
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2488 clicks; posted to Main » on 15 Oct 2013 at 11:49 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-10-15 12:38:49 PM  
4 votes:

Ikahoshi: The problem is, in the U.S. if your insurance company finds out, you'll be denied coverage for any of the illnesses you test positive for. The ultimate pre-existing condition: genetic disease.


Diogenes: Ikahoshi: The problem is, in the U.S. if your insurance company finds out, you'll be denied coverage for any of the illnesses you test positive for. The ultimate pre-existing condition: genetic disease.

Shouldn't that no longer be true with the ACA?

Plus, I would hope you can sign something with the tester such that they require your consent to share your results.


Yes, you need to sign something in order to give the company permission to share any of your info.

The Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act, or GINA, makes it illegal for an employer to fire someone based on his genes, and it's illegal for health insurers to raise rates or to deny coverage because of someone's genetic code. This was passed by Bush in 2008 and was strengthened by the ACA. The problem with GINA is that it only covers Health Insurance. You can still be denied Life, Long Term Care, or Disability insurance based on genetic testing. The good news is, right now insurers do not ask if you have been tested and the only way the information can get into the MIB (Medical Information Bureau: the clearinghouse for all of your medical/insurance records) is if you get treated for something based on info from the genetic testing and the treatment is covered by insurance.
2013-10-15 12:43:52 PM  
2 votes:
hstell:  In our family, we found that, contrary to what we'd been told, we have no ties to any known Native American populations.

That's probably very common. It seems like over half the country claims to have native blood but totally based on what a great-grandparent said. The interesting bit is the family connection part where you match up against relatives and sometimes... ooops... find out that dad isn't who anyone thinks he is. Apparently this is somewhat common on 23andMe when entire families get tested. I bet in most cases it didn't even occur to mom that the quickie in the Monte Carlo SS behind the pool hall a year after she got married might now come back to haunt her. That's going to be a big social impact when genome sequencing becomes $10 and standard procedure. It'll be interesting to see if feminist groups try to have laws passed that will protect cheaters from the consequences of indisputable infidelity. Currently false paternity often goes undetected since babies aren't tested unless there is a good reason to. With genome sequencing, it'll be a standard part of everyone's health records. There's no way "dad" won't know that the kid isn't his.
2013-10-15 12:11:27 PM  
2 votes:
I've given two tests as gifts.  They can be full of surprises -- you can find out what percentage of Neanderthal you are.  In our family, we found that, contrary to what we'd been told, we have no ties to any known Native American populations.  We found that our maternal dna (mt-dna) was a rare, old, and Near-Eastern type, rather than European, which we'd assumed.  There are pages of questions to answer, and pages of results to pore through, and some of it is definitely specific and can be a little scary.  We'd rather know than not know.  I'm thinking of sending out more as Christmas presents.  Only men can pull up the Y-dna type, so that's good to know in advance.  If you want to know where you came from ages and ages ago, it's fascinating.  I think it was worth the cash for just that much entertainment value, although the medical stuff is enlightening.
2013-10-15 12:06:01 PM  
2 votes:
I did the test. I'm a skinny dude with a much higher than usual risk of heart disease. My Alzheimer's risk was rated very low, though. And I'm a slow metabolizer of caffeine, though I pretty much already knew that. There are also tests for those freaky rare familial diseases which you have to click on a "don't flip out" disclaimer to access -- fortunately I had none of them.

For me it was worth the hundred bucks just to fulfill my curiosity (that and I'm adopted and have no real family history to refer to)
2013-10-15 02:12:44 PM  
1 votes:

xxmedium: I've used both services - familytreedna.com for mtdna and ydna (before familyfinder xdna testing was available) and 23andme.com for the xdna. I will second using gedmatch.com which will take results from both companies (and ancestry.com I believe too but not sure).

The biggest problem with gedmatch now is availability. They had to shut their site down for almost a month to migrate to another hosting provider because the demand for testing matches across different companies' data was so great their servers got swamped.


Absolutely - they are the victims of their own success. And they do take results from Ancestry.com. In the beginning, Ancestry.com didn't release the raw results, so you could not confirm the segment matches yourself. But everyone in the genetic genealogy community made it clear that they would recommend Ancestry.com LAST for this reason, and they relented and released raw data. Now gedmatch uses them, and you can see them by the "a" in the front of their gedmatch ID#.

One thing I didn't mention in my last offering to this list is that by comparing your cousins' matching segments and arriving at a common ancestral origin for that segment, and comparing that to the admixture features from gedmatch, you can tell WHICH family name is responsible for which ethnographic contribution.

According to FTDNA, my dad is right at 100% boring British DNA. My mom is 95% boring British DNA, and 5% "exotic" (my word). I have narrowed it down using autosomal DNA of distant cousins, and now I have my mom's close cousin doing FTDNA's Family Finder test and the mtDNA test. From it I should be able to determine which family is exotic.

The better admixture features (viz., superior to FTDNA's) have already shown that my purely paternal line is part Asian, which was a total surprise. But then again, it's source could have been maternal to the end of the road as I know it, so that patriarch's wife's maiden name could have been Nguyen for all I know.
2013-10-15 01:26:06 PM  
1 votes:
Cool, thanks for all the answers, everyone. I think I'll check this out.
2013-10-15 01:25:13 PM  
1 votes:
ecx.images-amazon.com
2013-10-15 01:06:53 PM  
1 votes:

Barry Lyndon's Annuity Cheque: Has anyone done this test? I'm leaning towards buying a kit, but I'm curious about just how informative the results are.

/interested in the trivia aspect, may or may not adjust my lifestyle based on the results


I've done it. They ship the kit. You spit in a vial and mail it back and wait a month. The testing information can loosely be broken down into two categories: health reports and genealogical information (which was my reason for signing up).

The health reports I really take with a grain of salt (and bacon). Some of them you have to specifically say "YES. I really, in fact, do want to know what the results are" on top of the normal consent stuff from sending in the test vial. That's because they are showing risks associated with some pretty scary stuff. Example: it was initially reported I was a tay-sachs carrier but it turned out that I just have mutation on the same gene that causes tay-sachs without it actually being tay-sachs (false positive).

They will also give an "ancestry composition" report that lets you what percentage of your genes are European, Middle Eastern, Asian, etc. and how much neanderthal DNA you have.

I have an estimated 2.6% of my DNA is from Neanderthals as opposed to the normal 2.7% average of other European heritage users.

Which is nice. So I got that going for me.
2013-10-15 12:48:31 PM  
1 votes:
My husband signed us up for this, just got the results back.  It's interesting, but in my case not life changing.  I do like the idea of further study being done, and participating in something like this just adds data.
2013-10-15 12:35:51 PM  
1 votes:

Mr_Fabulous: Most likely scenario for me: A combination of high blood pressure, low-level diabetes and congestive heart failure...maybe with a stroke thrown in for good measure.

Second-most likely: Car wreck.


Go for a walk, eat healthier, get lots of sleep, drink water, cut back on your salt, fat and sugar intake, stop or don't smoke, don't take harmful drugs, stay calm, be happy and find purpose...live a long time
2013-10-15 12:21:59 PM  
1 votes:
Despite the flippant Fark headline, it's actually a very interesting article.
2013-10-15 12:16:02 PM  
1 votes:
I really want to do it but they state that they do link the results to your name and shipping information. Database security isn't exactly foolproof.
2013-10-15 12:14:08 PM  
1 votes:
You know there are worse ways to go, but I can't think of a more undignified way than autoerotic asphyxiation.
2013-10-15 12:13:43 PM  
1 votes:
Here's a link to an interesting piece on how to get this testing done without giving them enough personal information to tie the results back to you.
2013-10-15 12:09:36 PM  
1 votes:

Ikahoshi: The problem is, in the U.S. if your insurance company finds out, you'll be denied coverage for any of the illnesses you test positive for. The ultimate pre-existing condition: genetic disease.


Shouldn't that no longer be true with the ACA?

Plus, I would hope you can sign something with the tester such that they require your consent to share your results.
2013-10-15 12:07:52 PM  
1 votes:

Barry Lyndon's Annuity Cheque: Has anyone done this test? I'm leaning towards buying a kit, but I'm curious about just how informative the results are.

/interested in the trivia aspect, may or may not adjust my lifestyle based on the results



I'm waiting for my results, though have looked at others around the web, and for $99 you get quite a lot... detailed ancestry info, traits you carry, a "relative finder" which looks for cousins by comparing your data to others, etc. For some people, the results can be life-changing... finding a relative you never know about, or learning about a medical condition (e.g. celiac disease)
2013-10-15 12:07:36 PM  
1 votes:
The problem is, in the U.S. if your insurance company finds out, you'll be denied coverage for any of the illnesses you test positive for. The ultimate pre-existing condition: genetic disease.
2013-10-15 11:57:09 AM  
1 votes:
I gave it a go and am currently waiting 4-6 weeks for the results.  I'm not expecting any surprises, but was curious.
2013-10-15 11:53:02 AM  
1 votes:
Has anyone done this test? I'm leaning towards buying a kit, but I'm curious about just how informative the results are.

/interested in the trivia aspect, may or may not adjust my lifestyle based on the results
 
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