If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Fast Company)   For $99, company will check your DNA and tell you how you will die. Frankie "The Fist" Pinasco will tell you for free   (fastcompany.com) divider line 72
    More: Misc, DNA, Anne Wojcicki, yahoo answers, Health Affairs, genetic counselors, genetic variant, Transfinite number, Lululemon  
•       •       •

2484 clicks; posted to Main » on 15 Oct 2013 at 11:49 AM (40 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



72 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2013-10-15 11:53:02 AM
Has anyone done this test? I'm leaning towards buying a kit, but I'm curious about just how informative the results are.

/interested in the trivia aspect, may or may not adjust my lifestyle based on the results
 
2013-10-15 11:55:50 AM
...but if I try to give a lady $99 to take some of my DNA, I get arrested!
 
2013-10-15 11:57:09 AM
I gave it a go and am currently waiting 4-6 weeks for the results.  I'm not expecting any surprises, but was curious.
 
2013-10-15 11:58:53 AM
I wonder if this a way for the government to find out more info on you.  They will find your close and distant relatives, which would be very beneficial for them to have if you are a criminal or someone of value.  I saw these commercials every 20-30 minutes last night on ESPN or some other sports network and this was the first thing I thought.
Not getting one.
 
2013-10-15 11:59:44 AM
snakeoilpromotions.com
Only $99!  It's a steal at that price!
 
2013-10-15 12:01:00 PM
Mine came back with  Alcohol Poisoning.

I had no idea I was Irish.
 
2013-10-15 12:03:13 PM
www.skeptic.com

Madam Zola will do the same for $20 and a tip.
 
2013-10-15 12:06:01 PM
I did the test. I'm a skinny dude with a much higher than usual risk of heart disease. My Alzheimer's risk was rated very low, though. And I'm a slow metabolizer of caffeine, though I pretty much already knew that. There are also tests for those freaky rare familial diseases which you have to click on a "don't flip out" disclaimer to access -- fortunately I had none of them.

For me it was worth the hundred bucks just to fulfill my curiosity (that and I'm adopted and have no real family history to refer to)
 
2013-10-15 12:07:36 PM
The problem is, in the U.S. if your insurance company finds out, you'll be denied coverage for any of the illnesses you test positive for. The ultimate pre-existing condition: genetic disease.
 
2013-10-15 12:07:52 PM

Barry Lyndon's Annuity Cheque: Has anyone done this test? I'm leaning towards buying a kit, but I'm curious about just how informative the results are.

/interested in the trivia aspect, may or may not adjust my lifestyle based on the results



I'm waiting for my results, though have looked at others around the web, and for $99 you get quite a lot... detailed ancestry info, traits you carry, a "relative finder" which looks for cousins by comparing your data to others, etc. For some people, the results can be life-changing... finding a relative you never know about, or learning about a medical condition (e.g. celiac disease)
 
2013-10-15 12:08:06 PM
this sounds familiar... I wonder if they will give you cryptic/ironic but correct ways of dying?

Machine of Death

If you haven't read the first set of short stories, I recommend that you do... also, a second book is out now.
 
2013-10-15 12:08:59 PM
I think I can get fortune cookies for a lot less than $99
 
2013-10-15 12:09:36 PM

Ikahoshi: The problem is, in the U.S. if your insurance company finds out, you'll be denied coverage for any of the illnesses you test positive for. The ultimate pre-existing condition: genetic disease.


Shouldn't that no longer be true with the ACA?

Plus, I would hope you can sign something with the tester such that they require your consent to share your results.
 
2013-10-15 12:09:53 PM
www.qwantz.com

http://machineofdeath.net/

The first book's quite good. Just started the second one, and the first story almost made me cry

/almost
 
2013-10-15 12:09:55 PM
I know I have 100% chance of dying.  I don't need to know how.
 
2013-10-15 12:10:55 PM

DirtyDeadGhostofEbenezerCooke: ...but if I try to give a lady $99 to take some of my DNA, I get arrested!


That's not an oral swab.
 
2013-10-15 12:10:58 PM
did anybody expect the Spanish Inquisition?
 
2013-10-15 12:11:15 PM
Based on my parents and maternal grandparents (dad was adopted), cancer, cancer, cancer, heart attack, heart attack, heart attack, heart failure, car accident. Yes I know there are too many choices there, that's because some of those happened more than once to the same person.

FML, basically.
 
2013-10-15 12:11:27 PM
I've given two tests as gifts.  They can be full of surprises -- you can find out what percentage of Neanderthal you are.  In our family, we found that, contrary to what we'd been told, we have no ties to any known Native American populations.  We found that our maternal dna (mt-dna) was a rare, old, and Near-Eastern type, rather than European, which we'd assumed.  There are pages of questions to answer, and pages of results to pore through, and some of it is definitely specific and can be a little scary.  We'd rather know than not know.  I'm thinking of sending out more as Christmas presents.  Only men can pull up the Y-dna type, so that's good to know in advance.  If you want to know where you came from ages and ages ago, it's fascinating.  I think it was worth the cash for just that much entertainment value, although the medical stuff is enlightening.
 
2013-10-15 12:11:54 PM

JohnnyRebel88: I wonder if this a way for the government to find out more info on you.  They will find your close and distant relatives, which would be very beneficial for them to have if you are a criminal or someone of value.  I saw these commercials every 20-30 minutes last night on ESPN or some other sports network and this was the first thing I thought.
Not getting one.


Just register the kit under a pseudonym on a secure/separate connection, using a Hushmail email account, and keep the "relative finder" feature turned off.


Ikahoshi: The problem is, in the U.S. if your insurance company finds out, you'll be denied coverage for any of the illnesses you test positive for. The ultimate pre-existing condition: genetic disease.


That is illegal under GINA and other legislation passed in recent years. Not that they won't try, of course...
 
2013-10-15 12:12:55 PM
They will know that I will die of a heart attack at 80 in a hot tub with two 18 year old cheerleaders? Spookie!
 
2013-10-15 12:13:23 PM
...alone and unloved?
 
2013-10-15 12:13:30 PM
Autoerotic asphyxiation?  WTF does that mean?
 
2013-10-15 12:13:43 PM
Here's a link to an interesting piece on how to get this testing done without giving them enough personal information to tie the results back to you.
 
2013-10-15 12:14:08 PM
You know there are worse ways to go, but I can't think of a more undignified way than autoerotic asphyxiation.
 
2013-10-15 12:15:21 PM

Russ1642: You know there are worse ways to go, but I can't think of a more undignified way than autoerotic asphyxiation.


Mama Cass and Elvis would disagree.

/shrug
 
2013-10-15 12:16:02 PM
I really want to do it but they state that they do link the results to your name and shipping information. Database security isn't exactly foolproof.
 
2013-10-15 12:16:29 PM

Russ1642: You know there are worse ways to go, but I can't think of a more undignified way than autoerotic asphyxiation.


Came for this.
 
2013-10-15 12:17:48 PM
 
2013-10-15 12:20:51 PM
3.bp.blogspot.com
 
2013-10-15 12:21:59 PM
Despite the flippant Fark headline, it's actually a very interesting article.
 
2013-10-15 12:24:14 PM

apoptotic: Despite the flippant Fark headline, it's actually a very interesting article.


FTFM
 
2013-10-15 12:25:09 PM
img.fark.net


You will die of depression.
 
2013-10-15 12:25:55 PM

GoodyearPimp: I gave it a go and am currently waiting 4-6 weeks for the results.  I'm not expecting any surprises, but was curious.


Just go see the topless psychic at the dirt mall.  The reading will be just as accurate and you'll get to see some tits.  And maybe an extra nipple.
 
2013-10-15 12:27:39 PM

jtown: GoodyearPimp: I gave it a go and am currently waiting 4-6 weeks for the results.  I'm not expecting any surprises, but was curious.

Just go see the topless psychic at the dirt mall.  The reading will be just as accurate and you'll get to see some tits.  And maybe an extra nipple.


Really, she has a third nipple?  I didn't even notice!
 
2013-10-15 12:29:30 PM

Lego_Addict: I really want to do it but they state that they do link the results to your name and shipping information. Database security isn't exactly foolproof.



Fake name, borrow a friend's credit card and address?
 
2013-10-15 12:32:28 PM
What if you aren't going to die?

images4.wikia.nocookie.net
 
2013-10-15 12:32:30 PM
Hardly new... they've been doing this a few years now.

You can even DNA test your mutt now to see what breeds it has in it.
 
2013-10-15 12:32:56 PM

Barry Lyndon's Annuity Cheque: Has anyone done this test? I'm leaning towards buying a kit, but I'm curious about just how informative the results are.


Do it for fun, don't do it for information.  Scientists don't know how to pick through genomic data like that yet.  I think it's going to be a huge going forward in medicine but we're decades away.  The best you will get is "this thing here is correlated with a _____% chance of _______."  And I'm sure you know about correlations.
 
2013-10-15 12:33:24 PM
Most likely scenario for me: A combination of high blood pressure, low-level diabetes and congestive heart failure...maybe with a stroke thrown in for good measure.

Second-most likely: Car wreck.
 
2013-10-15 12:33:48 PM
For $99 could I get them to shorten this version of War & Peace? I'm pretty sure if I RTFA I would find something about where the sheriff ate lunch before getting to the scene of the accidental DNA test...
 
2013-10-15 12:34:57 PM
'Self-Inflicted Pill Overdose After Losing Life-Savings to Swindlers'?  WTF does this mean? Aw, hell... But that's better than my brother.  He got 'Knifed by Gender-Confused Transient'.
 
2013-10-15 12:35:51 PM

Mr_Fabulous: Most likely scenario for me: A combination of high blood pressure, low-level diabetes and congestive heart failure...maybe with a stroke thrown in for good measure.

Second-most likely: Car wreck.


Go for a walk, eat healthier, get lots of sleep, drink water, cut back on your salt, fat and sugar intake, stop or don't smoke, don't take harmful drugs, stay calm, be happy and find purpose...live a long time
 
2013-10-15 12:38:49 PM

Ikahoshi: The problem is, in the U.S. if your insurance company finds out, you'll be denied coverage for any of the illnesses you test positive for. The ultimate pre-existing condition: genetic disease.


Diogenes: Ikahoshi: The problem is, in the U.S. if your insurance company finds out, you'll be denied coverage for any of the illnesses you test positive for. The ultimate pre-existing condition: genetic disease.

Shouldn't that no longer be true with the ACA?

Plus, I would hope you can sign something with the tester such that they require your consent to share your results.


Yes, you need to sign something in order to give the company permission to share any of your info.

The Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act, or GINA, makes it illegal for an employer to fire someone based on his genes, and it's illegal for health insurers to raise rates or to deny coverage because of someone's genetic code. This was passed by Bush in 2008 and was strengthened by the ACA. The problem with GINA is that it only covers Health Insurance. You can still be denied Life, Long Term Care, or Disability insurance based on genetic testing. The good news is, right now insurers do not ask if you have been tested and the only way the information can get into the MIB (Medical Information Bureau: the clearinghouse for all of your medical/insurance records) is if you get treated for something based on info from the genetic testing and the treatment is covered by insurance.
 
2013-10-15 12:41:09 PM
i406.photobucket.com
 
2013-10-15 12:43:26 PM
I had mine done, turns out I have 35% Anunnaki Alien DNA just as some Ancient Alien Theorist have suggested.
 
2013-10-15 12:43:52 PM
hstell:  In our family, we found that, contrary to what we'd been told, we have no ties to any known Native American populations.

That's probably very common. It seems like over half the country claims to have native blood but totally based on what a great-grandparent said. The interesting bit is the family connection part where you match up against relatives and sometimes... ooops... find out that dad isn't who anyone thinks he is. Apparently this is somewhat common on 23andMe when entire families get tested. I bet in most cases it didn't even occur to mom that the quickie in the Monte Carlo SS behind the pool hall a year after she got married might now come back to haunt her. That's going to be a big social impact when genome sequencing becomes $10 and standard procedure. It'll be interesting to see if feminist groups try to have laws passed that will protect cheaters from the consequences of indisputable infidelity. Currently false paternity often goes undetected since babies aren't tested unless there is a good reason to. With genome sequencing, it'll be a standard part of everyone's health records. There's no way "dad" won't know that the kid isn't his.
 
2013-10-15 12:48:31 PM
My husband signed us up for this, just got the results back.  It's interesting, but in my case not life changing.  I do like the idea of further study being done, and participating in something like this just adds data.
 
2013-10-15 12:54:12 PM
Right, the feature that allows relatives to contact each other kicked in, and two women who have been adopted and have no knowledge at all about their family history are asking questions.  The distinctive maternal dna is a major link, so we have a really good idea how they connect, and how far back.  So, yeah, someone's cover will be blown, big time.  Dates of birth and proximity won't leave much room for doubt.  Doesn't mean they'll contact the parent -- they just want to know.
 
2013-10-15 01:00:13 PM
There can also be some interesting surprises. The PBS show "Finding Your Roots" (which uses 23 and Me) profiled Kevin Bacon and Kyra Sedgwick and they found out that they were cousins (granted, ninth cousins which means that they shared a common ancestor 11 generations back) but there will be some who unexpectedly find out closer relationships.
 
2013-10-15 01:05:44 PM

indarwinsshadow: Mr_Fabulous: Most likely scenario for me: A combination of high blood pressure, low-level diabetes and congestive heart failure...maybe with a stroke thrown in for good measure.

Second-most likely: Car wreck.

Go for a walk, eat healthier, get lots of sleep, drink water, cut back on your salt, fat and sugar intake, stop or don't smoke, don't take harmful drugs, stay calm, be happy and find purpose...live a long time


I'm actually an avid walker, I'm about the same weight I was 30 years ago, when I was 20 (a little under 170 lbs.), drink fresh water all day long, stopped smoking 12 years ago, never use harmful drugs (besides alcohol), and I'm not just calm and happy... I'm Mr. Goddamn Fabulous.

But you can't fight genetics, man.
 
2013-10-15 01:06:53 PM

Barry Lyndon's Annuity Cheque: Has anyone done this test? I'm leaning towards buying a kit, but I'm curious about just how informative the results are.

/interested in the trivia aspect, may or may not adjust my lifestyle based on the results


I've done it. They ship the kit. You spit in a vial and mail it back and wait a month. The testing information can loosely be broken down into two categories: health reports and genealogical information (which was my reason for signing up).

The health reports I really take with a grain of salt (and bacon). Some of them you have to specifically say "YES. I really, in fact, do want to know what the results are" on top of the normal consent stuff from sending in the test vial. That's because they are showing risks associated with some pretty scary stuff. Example: it was initially reported I was a tay-sachs carrier but it turned out that I just have mutation on the same gene that causes tay-sachs without it actually being tay-sachs (false positive).

They will also give an "ancestry composition" report that lets you what percentage of your genes are European, Middle Eastern, Asian, etc. and how much neanderthal DNA you have.

I have an estimated 2.6% of my DNA is from Neanderthals as opposed to the normal 2.7% average of other European heritage users.

Which is nice. So I got that going for me.
 
2013-10-15 01:14:01 PM

Barry Lyndon's Annuity Cheque: Has anyone done this test? I'm leaning towards buying a kit, but I'm curious about just how informative the results are.

/interested in the trivia aspect, may or may not adjust my lifestyle based on the results


I got my results back this morning and I have to say that I'm pretty pleased.

i236.photobucket.com
 
2013-10-15 01:25:13 PM
ecx.images-amazon.com
 
2013-10-15 01:26:06 PM
Cool, thanks for all the answers, everyone. I think I'll check this out.
 
2013-10-15 01:36:54 PM

BalugaJoe: [ecx.images-amazon.com image 209x300]


Satisfied.

Also, if they're going to sell it, then I should get a piece of the action and not have to fork over $99.
 
2013-10-15 01:41:03 PM

GoodyearPimp: I gave it a go and am currently waiting 4-6 weeks for the results.  I'm not expecting any surprises, but was curious.


Please fark about it if the the results are enlightening. Got you favorited.
 
2013-10-15 01:42:26 PM
Family Tree DNA (FTDNA) has the equivalent test with the health information stripped from the output file (also for $99).

Why would you want to take this test without it? Genealogy. By noting shared ancestral surnames with your DNA match, one can arrive at conclusions about surnames that are ancestral to you, but about which you were previously unaware. To the genealogist, that's huge.

Also, there is a website called gedmatch where people can upload their data, and so you can check your matches across platforms (AncestryDNA also does this test, so there are at least 3 labs with matching possible using gedmatch).

Here is FTDNA's chromosome browser canned graphic.

www.ancestorcentral.com
Using gedmatch, you can derive a good estimate of your ethnographic composition using the admixture utilities.

img856.imageshack.us

So it isn't just about health. It is also useful for family history, both for a few hundred years ago, and a few thousand years ago.
 
2013-10-15 01:43:42 PM
guilt by association:
Just register the kit under a pseudonym on a secure/separate connection, using a Hushmail email account, and keep the "relative finder" feature turned off.

I know this, and obviously so do you, but by putting this out there, others might think twice.  Anyway in theory, if they had enough data, they might be able to link you to others.

Ikahoshi: The problem is, in the U.S. if your insurance company finds out, you'll be denied coverage for any of the illnesses you test positive for. The ultimate pre-existing condition: genetic disease.

That is illegal under GINA and other legislation passed in recent years. Not that they won't try, of course...


How do you know that the company will not sell only your info, but the entire company to the government or someone that will?  People that want information usually make it look pleasing to a blind consumer and that was my point.
 
2013-10-15 01:46:53 PM

Lego_Addict: I really want to do it but they state that they do link the results to your name and shipping information. Database security isn't exactly foolproof.


Super worst
 
2013-10-15 01:49:08 PM
As an adoptee this kind of service is invaluable.  I know next to nothing about my national heritage, and absolutely nothing about family medical history.  Can't tell you how much time I've spent in my lifetime wondering about this stuff.  I'm $99 poorer but feel like a huge, hidden part of "me" is about to be revealed.

CSB:  I was adopted from the same agency that adopted out Charlie Manson's son.  We were born within weeks of one another and likely shared a nursery.  It was sheer luck that my folks got me and the next couple got a kid that grew up to look almost exactly like Charlie!   http://www.details.com/culture-trends/critical-eye/201003/matthew-rob e rts-biological-father-charles-manson?currentPage=1
 
2013-10-15 01:59:09 PM

SevenizGud: Family Tree DNA (FTDNA) has the equivalent test with the health information stripped from the output file (also for $99).

Why would you want to take this test without it? Genealogy. By noting shared ancestral surnames with your DNA match, one can arrive at conclusions about surnames that are ancestral to you, but about which you were previously unaware. To the genealogist, that's huge.

Also, there is a website called gedmatch where people can upload their data, and so you can check your matches across platforms (AncestryDNA also does this test, so there are at least 3 labs with matching possible using gedmatch).


I've used both services  - familytreedna.com for mtdna and ydna (before familyfinder xdna testing was available) and 23andme.com for the xdna. I will second using gedmatch.com which will take results from both companies (and ancestry.com I believe too but not sure).

The biggest problem with gedmatch now is availability. They had to shut their site down for almost a month to migrate to another hosting provider because the demand for testing matches across different companies' data was so great their servers got swamped.
 
2013-10-15 01:59:45 PM

MadMonk: [i406.photobucket.com image 720x960]


I like the one that says, "Disregard your previous fortune cookie."
 
2013-10-15 02:11:00 PM

JohnnyRebel88: guilt by association:
Just register the kit under a pseudonym on a secure/separate connection, using a Hushmail email account, and keep the "relative finder" feature turned off.


I know this, and obviously so do you, but by putting this out there, others might think twice.  Anyway in theory, if they had enough data, they might be able to link you to others.

Ikahoshi: The problem is, in the U.S. if your insurance company finds out, you'll be denied coverage for any of the illnesses you test positive for. The ultimate pre-existing condition: genetic disease.

That is illegal under GINA and other legislation passed in recent years. Not that they won't try, of course...


How do you know that the company will not sell only your info, but the entire company to the government or someone that will?  People that want information usually make it look pleasing to a blind consumer and that was my point.


I understand your point, but if the government wants something bad enough, they will get it, law be damned. Eventually these DNA tests will be so cheap that most of the country will have their genome stored on a server somewhere. The way I see it, much of the concerns about 23andMe's practices are worst-case scenarios. I pretty much surrendered my bio-identity about twenty years ago for a fingerprinting merit badge in boy scouts.
 
2013-10-15 02:12:44 PM

xxmedium: I've used both services - familytreedna.com for mtdna and ydna (before familyfinder xdna testing was available) and 23andme.com for the xdna. I will second using gedmatch.com which will take results from both companies (and ancestry.com I believe too but not sure).

The biggest problem with gedmatch now is availability. They had to shut their site down for almost a month to migrate to another hosting provider because the demand for testing matches across different companies' data was so great their servers got swamped.


Absolutely - they are the victims of their own success. And they do take results from Ancestry.com. In the beginning, Ancestry.com didn't release the raw results, so you could not confirm the segment matches yourself. But everyone in the genetic genealogy community made it clear that they would recommend Ancestry.com LAST for this reason, and they relented and released raw data. Now gedmatch uses them, and you can see them by the "a" in the front of their gedmatch ID#.

One thing I didn't mention in my last offering to this list is that by comparing your cousins' matching segments and arriving at a common ancestral origin for that segment, and comparing that to the admixture features from gedmatch, you can tell WHICH family name is responsible for which ethnographic contribution.

According to FTDNA, my dad is right at 100% boring British DNA. My mom is 95% boring British DNA, and 5% "exotic" (my word). I have narrowed it down using autosomal DNA of distant cousins, and now I have my mom's close cousin doing FTDNA's Family Finder test and the mtDNA test. From it I should be able to determine which family is exotic.

The better admixture features (viz., superior to FTDNA's) have already shown that my purely paternal line is part Asian, which was a total surprise. But then again, it's source could have been maternal to the end of the road as I know it, so that patriarch's wife's maiden name could have been Nguyen for all I know.
 
2013-10-15 03:50:01 PM
www.dvdactive.com
 
2013-10-15 03:51:36 PM
That worked well.

It was a picture of the "witch" from Big Fish. If you looked in her glass eye you could see how you were going to die. I thought it would be a relevant movie reference.
 
2013-10-15 04:41:11 PM

caddisfly: As an adoptee this kind of service is invaluable.  I know next to nothing about my national heritage, and absolutely nothing about family medical history.  Can't tell you how much time I've spent in my lifetime wondering about this stuff.  I'm $99 poorer but feel like a huge, hidden part of "me" is about to be revealed.


As I said, my dad was adopted, so I'm pretty curious if we have *actual* relatives out there from his side, but he's absolutely not, so has never been tested. That's about the only reason I'd go through with this, but since he doesn't care, I don't feel like dropping the scratch on it. Maybe someday.

/this way there are fewer presents to buy at Christmas...
 
2013-10-15 05:53:33 PM
DirtyDeadGhostofEbenezerCooke: ...but if I try to give a lady $99 to take some of my DNA, I get arrested!

Diogenes: That's not an oral swab.


He's got it backwards. The guy pays the $99 to make the deposit, not the lady.
Besides that, his "sample" probably isn't worth $99.
 
2013-10-15 07:44:23 PM

Barry Lyndon's Annuity Cheque: Has anyone done this test? I'm leaning towards buying a kit, but I'm curious about just how informative the results are.

/interested in the trivia aspect, may or may not adjust my lifestyle based on the results


I have. My interest was about a 50-50 split between interest in health and in genealogy (I paid for the test for both of my parents to help).

The results seems to be pretty informative, and I've connected a few branches of my family tree (like the family of a third cousin who died in Vietnam, for example). Luckily, I don't seem to have many gene variants with deadly risk factors. Sadly, the members of my dad's side of the family seem much less likely to test.

All in all, I think it was money well-spent, and I purchased the tests when they were more than the $99 apiece they are charging now. I would definitely do it again at that price.

/As another negative, like the article said, doctors don't pay much attention to the tests. I will, however, raise a red flag if he ever wants to dose me with Warfarin.
 
2013-10-15 08:04:07 PM
si0.twimg.com

You die when the good Chuck decides it's time. No exceptions!
 
2013-10-16 01:36:06 AM

Cybernetic: Here's a link to an interesting piece on how to get this testing done without giving them enough personal information to tie the results back to you.


And yet, with that article, she completely made all of her supposed efforts useless.  She gave out too much info that even if many are red herrings, I'd give myself a 50/50 chance that, with access to the databases,  I'd be able to figure out which sample was her's.  Sure the NSA's already made paper airplanes out of her files just for the hell of it.
 
Displayed 72 of 72 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report