If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(STLToday)   After Taco Bell rejects your $2 bill, don't try to use it to pay the $2 bus fare   (stltoday.com) divider line 17
    More: Amusing, Metrobus, custom software  
•       •       •

9434 clicks; posted to Main » on 14 Oct 2013 at 7:10 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



Voting Results (Smartest)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

2013-10-14 07:16:55 AM  
5 votes:
If you want to do business in the U.S. then you should be required to accept all legal U.S. Currency.
2013-10-14 07:39:43 AM  
3 votes:

eldritch2k4: [upload.wikimedia.org image 800x328]

Top left: "This note is legal tender for all debts, public and private."

Metro users who also use $2 bills should just plonk that bill down and go sit down.


::sigh::

Yet another person who doesn't understand what that means. If you paid for the bus fare as you got OFF the bus, you'd be right- you would be in debt to them, and thus the $2 bill would be legal tender to pay off that debt. But, if you have to pay at the beginning of your ride, then you do not have a "debt" to pay off yet. It is perfectly legal for companies to limit the types of payments they take (which is why you can't pay with big bills ($50, $100) at some places).
2013-10-15 08:09:28 AM  
1 votes:

wallywam1: fredklein: AliceBToklasLives: It's more like measuring in yards without the yardstick existing, which is exactly how we measure in miles (I don't think there's a milestick, except in some farkers' dreams).

The mile is based upon 1000 paces. Which is infinitely more useful than a kilometer, which is based upon 1000 of "the distance traveled by light in a vacuum in 1/299,792,458 of a second".

How do you figure that a mile is based on 1000 paces?


The Romans, when marching their armies through Europe, were the first to use the unit of long distance mille passuum (literally "a thousand paces" in Latin, where each pace or stride was two steps). - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mile#Roman_mile

A yard is about one pace

Um, no. Not unless you are a midget. A pace is two steps.

As far as measurements being useful, the metric system revolves around water. 1 cubic centimeter (linear measure) equals 1 mL (volume) and you can easily multiply that by 1000 to get 1 L, which is equivalent to 1 kg (mass) of water. The mass of one cubic meter of water is 1 metric ton.

And all that's fine... if you're in a laboratory. Or in the engineering field. For 'real life' issues, Imperial measures are better.
2013-10-14 07:40:49 PM  
1 votes:

OrangeSnapper: fredklein: gerbilpox: Granted, pennies should have been discontinued by the Treasury a long time ago. They cost more than 1 cent to make, so they (i.e., we taxpayers) lose money on each one

Um, it's not like they get used once and thrown away.

I really don't understand this 'get rid of the penny' nonsense. The cent is the basic unit for coinage. A nickel is '5 cents'. A dime is '10 cents'. A quarter is a quarter dollar, or... 25 cents. If you get rid of the penny, there will be no coin for the basic unit. That's like measuring distances in miles, but the mile itself not existing. Or measuring capacity in gallons,, but not having any gallon jugs.

...or measuring oil in barrels, despite not actually putting it into barrels.


But barrels do actually exist.
2013-10-14 10:40:29 AM  
1 votes:

itsaidwhat: itsaidwhat: Wodheila: I wish I had taken a picture of the "cow looking at a new gate' look the kid at In N Out had when he looked ad the Sacajawea $1 coins I handed him.  I suggested he call the manager who, after confirming their validity,   looked at us as if we were the 'problem.

I was given some $1 Susan B anthony coins in change as quarters at a McDonalds drive thru once. I returned them and explained what they were to the kid.

To be clear, I said "these are dollars, not quarters". I didn't attempt to explain the women's suffrage movement and/or Susan B Anthony.


You would have confused him anyway.  Why on earth would women want to suffer?  I tried my hardest to not give a girl at McDonalds a "you must be an idiot" look when she said "is this money" as I paid with a two dolla beille.
2013-10-14 10:22:02 AM  
1 votes:
This is ridiculous...  I assume (hope) that they are still required to accept legal us tender that also happens to be exact change...  Just because the machine doesn't take it doesn't mean the man behind the steering wheel can't.
2013-10-14 09:35:39 AM  
1 votes:

fredklein: gerbilpox: Granted, pennies should have been discontinued by the Treasury a long time ago. They cost more than 1 cent to make, so they (i.e., we taxpayers) lose money on each one

Um, it's not like they get used once and thrown away.

I really don't understand this 'get rid of the penny' nonsense. The cent is the basic unit for coinage. A nickel is '5 cents'. A dime is '10 cents'. A quarter is a quarter dollar, or... 25 cents. If you get rid of the penny, there will be no coin for the basic unit. That's like measuring distances in miles, but the mile itself not existing. Or measuring capacity in gallons,, but not having any gallon jugs.


Yet when Canada eliminated their penny, there was no noticeable effect on their economy. Same when Britain removed theirs. All that happen was the government stopped wasting money producing coins no one needed.
2013-10-14 09:09:35 AM  
1 votes:

fredklein: gerbilpox: Granted, pennies should have been discontinued by the Treasury a long time ago. They cost more than 1 cent to make, so they (i.e., we taxpayers) lose money on each one

Um, it's not like they get used once and thrown away.

I really don't understand this 'get rid of the penny' nonsense. The cent is the basic unit for coinage. A nickel is '5 cents'. A dime is '10 cents'. A quarter is a quarter dollar, or... 25 cents. If you get rid of the penny, there will be no coin for the basic unit. That's like measuring distances in miles, but the mile itself not existing. Or measuring capacity in gallons,, but not having any gallon jugs.


It's more like measuring in yards without the yardstick existing, which is exactly how we measure in miles (I don't think there's a milestick, except in some farkers' dreams).

Nice thing about the penny - we have a nice large-scale experiment going on to the North of us.  Let's see how the Canadians do it.  Maybe getting rid of* the penny will work.

*the penny is still legal tender in Canada, but no longer produced, in the hope that retailers will round to the nearest nickel
2013-10-14 08:58:14 AM  
1 votes:

gerbilpox: Granted, pennies should have been discontinued by the Treasury a long time ago. They cost more than 1 cent to make, so they (i.e., we taxpayers) lose money on each one


Um, it's not like they get used once and thrown away.

I really don't understand this 'get rid of the penny' nonsense. The cent is the basic unit for coinage. A nickel is '5 cents'. A dime is '10 cents'. A quarter is a quarter dollar, or... 25 cents. If you get rid of the penny, there will be no coin for the basic unit. That's like measuring distances in miles, but the mile itself not existing. Or measuring capacity in gallons,, but not having any gallon jugs.
2013-10-14 08:37:12 AM  
1 votes:
Starlost...sorry to burst your bubble but there are no $500 bills or $1000 bills available for the ordinary citizen to utilize.  The Federal Reserve holds them for its own use in transferring funds between its banks.  The government withdrew them from general use as an anti-drug measure so that it would be more difficult for the cartels to transfer large sums of cash.
2013-10-14 08:19:59 AM  
1 votes:
I'm more irritated that they won't accept pennies now. They aren't rare like $2 bills, half-dollars, and dollar coins.

Metro bus riders deposited more than 1.9 million of them in the last fiscal year.

If the riders are using them that much, deal with it! What are they going to do if someone only has enough cash for the fare with pennies included? Say, "tough shiat, go pound bricks"? Actually, that's probably exactly what they'll do.

Granted, pennies should have been discontinued by the Treasury a long time ago. They cost more than 1 cent to make, so they (i.e., we taxpayers) lose money on each one. Nonetheless, they're still around, and Metro doesn't have to make them, just accept them. Again, deal with it!
2013-10-14 07:53:29 AM  
1 votes:
The manufacturer said that would require costly customized software. No other transit agency had requested it before. So Metro decided to skip on the $2 bills, Beck said.

Looks like the manufacturer needs to be paid in $2 bills and nothing else. That'd tickle their legal tenders.
2013-10-14 07:48:52 AM  
1 votes:

GDubDub: This will change.

While they can specify coinage (coin is not legal tender by law), $2 bills are.  It is illegal for them not to accept it as payment for a $2 fare.


heypete: eldritch2k4: [upload.wikimedia.org image 800x328]

Top left: "This note is legal tender for all debts, public and private."

Metro users who also use $2 bills should just plonk that bill down and go sit down.

Not exactly.


I stand corrected..

[themoreyouknow.jpg]
2013-10-14 07:46:06 AM  
1 votes:

GDubDub: This will change.

While they can specify coinage (coin is not legal tender by law), $2 bills are.  It is illegal for them not to accept it as payment for a $2 fare.


Again, no its not. They can simply refuse service, therefore no debt.
2013-10-14 07:31:14 AM  
1 votes:
upload.wikimedia.org

Top left: "This note is legal tender for all debts, public and private."

Metro users who also use $2 bills should just plonk that bill down and go sit down.
2013-10-14 07:25:05 AM  
1 votes:
Protip:  $2 bills are great for tipping strippers.
2013-10-14 07:20:47 AM  
1 votes:
The government once had high hopes for the bill. A 1976 research paper published by the Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond, Va., noted that the $2 bill "can save the Government, and therefore all taxpayers, money and increase the convenience of cash transactions."

And that might have happened if you dropped the 1$ bill, and released the 1$ coin and 2$ bill simultaneously.
/but ya didn't
 
Displayed 17 of 17 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report