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(STLToday)   After Taco Bell rejects your $2 bill, don't try to use it to pay the $2 bus fare   (stltoday.com) divider line 73
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9428 clicks; posted to Main » on 14 Oct 2013 at 7:10 AM (48 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-10-14 10:40:29 AM

itsaidwhat: itsaidwhat: Wodheila: I wish I had taken a picture of the "cow looking at a new gate' look the kid at In N Out had when he looked ad the Sacajawea $1 coins I handed him.  I suggested he call the manager who, after confirming their validity,   looked at us as if we were the 'problem.

I was given some $1 Susan B anthony coins in change as quarters at a McDonalds drive thru once. I returned them and explained what they were to the kid.

To be clear, I said "these are dollars, not quarters". I didn't attempt to explain the women's suffrage movement and/or Susan B Anthony.


You would have confused him anyway.  Why on earth would women want to suffer?  I tried my hardest to not give a girl at McDonalds a "you must be an idiot" look when she said "is this money" as I paid with a two dolla beille.
 
2013-10-14 10:48:34 AM

Maul555: This is ridiculous...  I assume (hope) that they are still required to accept legal us tender that also happens to be exact change...  Just because the machine doesn't take it doesn't mean the man behind the steering wheel can't.


The man behind the steering wheel most likely is not allowed to touch the money or make change.  Too much legal liability, either for the driver if their is a dispute, or for the bus company if someone robs the bus driver because he is carrying enough money on him to make change for over 200 people a day.
 
2013-10-14 11:01:57 AM
But I just like to tear one off the sheet when I pay!

2.bp.blogspot.com

But seriously, back when I had a local branch bank I always went in to get $2 bills and dollar coins.

I used the coins for parking, all the central meters and parking garages took them and they sure saved time over trying to get the stupid bill reader to work. 50¢ pieces are convenient for parking as well, but not as common.

In a restaurant I'd usually leave the regular tip and put a $2 bill down with it. It makes people smile.

I really can't understand bill scanners not accepting them. That seems like a "bug" resold as a "feature".
 
2013-10-14 11:16:13 AM

fredklein: gerbilpox: Granted, pennies should have been discontinued by the Treasury a long time ago. They cost more than 1 cent to make, so they (i.e., we taxpayers) lose money on each one

Um, it's not like they get used once and thrown away.

I really don't understand this 'get rid of the penny' nonsense. The cent is the basic unit for coinage. A nickel is '5 cents'. A dime is '10 cents'. A quarter is a quarter dollar, or... 25 cents. If you get rid of the penny, there will be no coin for the basic unit. That's like measuring distances in miles, but the mile itself not existing. Or measuring capacity in gallons,, but not having any gallon jugs.


The problem with the penny is its value. When the penny has so little value that a cup of coffee or a beer is measured in HUNDREDS of them, it is time to give them up. Your analogy of miles just isn't any good -- we don't measure things in pennies.
 
2013-10-14 11:49:27 AM
I have a magic trick that consists of changing two dollar bill into two one dollar coins. It was sold to me by a magician at Haines House of Cards in Cincinnati. Since I can no longer do the trick (my hands are too stiff) I have considered spending the bill and the coins.
 
2013-10-14 11:55:05 AM

AliceBToklasLives: Nice thing about the penny - we have a nice large-scale experiment going on to the North of us. Let's see how the Canadians do it. Maybe getting rid of* the penny will work.


Initially the old folks talked about "heritage" and "tradition" and their sunshine memories from their youth of buying "penny candy" and a few kooks worried about being gouged a few extra cents by the corporate machine and then the penny was axed and nobody cared. For cash transactions retailers round up or down to the nearest nickel and if you pay with plastic you pay the pennies. If you want to pay with pennies in a cash transaction they are accepted and the pennies never make it back to the wild after being deposited at a bank.
 
2013-10-14 11:56:05 AM
I really do not think they should get rid of the penny, after all, look at the economic fallout of getting rid of half-pennies.

After all when we got rid of half-pennies they had the buying power of a modern dime, that must have caused problems, right?
 
2013-10-14 12:18:21 PM

zamboni: The government once had high hopes for the bill. A 1976 research paper published by the Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond, Va., noted that the $2 bill "can save the Government, and therefore all taxpayers, money and increase the convenience of cash transactions."

And that might have happened if you dropped the 1$ bill, and released the 1$ coin and 2$ bill simultaneously.
/but ya didn't


think the problem is that you need both the Bureau of Engraving and Printing and the Mint to coordinate both those things (discontinue $1 bills, ramp up $2's, ramp up $1 coins, and maybe discontinue pennies while they're at it).
 
2013-10-14 12:19:34 PM

Big_Fat_Liar: itsaidwhat: itsaidwhat: Wodheila: I wish I had taken a picture of the "cow looking at a new gate' look the kid at In N Out had when he looked ad the Sacajawea $1 coins I handed him.  I suggested he call the manager who, after confirming their validity,   looked at us as if we were the 'problem.

I was given some $1 Susan B anthony coins in change as quarters at a McDonalds drive thru once. I returned them and explained what they were to the kid.

To be clear, I said "these are dollars, not quarters". I didn't attempt to explain the women's suffrage movement and/or Susan B Anthony.

You would have confused him anyway.  Why on earth would women want to suffer?  I tried my hardest to not give a girl at McDonalds a "you must be an idiot" look when she said "is this money" as I paid with a two dolla beille.


An appropriate response would be "is this food?"

/I actually like McDonalds and think they do a good job of serving a safe consistent and tasty meal with variety for the money and quickly too.
 
2013-10-14 03:41:53 PM

Lost Thought 00: eldritch2k4: Top left: "This note is legal tender for all debts, public and private."

Metro users who also use $2 bills should just plonk that bill down and go sit down.

That only applies to debts enforced by court order.


So use it to pay your child support! Fun for everyone!
 
2013-10-14 04:04:52 PM
Representing yo!
spacebison.com
 
2013-10-14 05:03:19 PM
I liked the idea of a Dollar coin and $2 bills after being forced to use them while broke down and stuck in Alberta for a week back in the 90s. The $2 bills kept you from having a pocket of coins. How is it working out up there now with the Twoonie?

I like the idea of getting rid of the penny. If someone wants to still use them in cash transactions, they can while they are still in circulation. Exact rounding can still be used for electronic transactions and all others, if it ends in 3 or 4, round up, if it ends in 1 or 2, round down. All the fuss is over a couple of cents either way that should average out over your lifetime.
 
2013-10-14 05:27:55 PM

The Irresponsible Captain: But I just like to tear one off the sheet when I pay!

2.bp.blogspot.com


For his college graduation, I gave my godson a sheet of 50 $2 bills and a pair of scissors.  He spent a few months hitting various stores, unrolling the sheet, and cutting out bills to pay for his purchases.  At least 10 places refused to take his money and was asked to leave and was threatened with calling the cops at least once.

/I tried to get another sheet for my nephew's HS graduation but the US Mint doesn't sell them anymore
//I can get one from a collector, but I can only find sheets of 32 and they're all from collectors who want at least $150.
 
2013-10-14 05:31:55 PM

brigid_fitch: //I can get one from a collector, but I can only find sheets of 32 and they're all from collectors who want at least $150.


I take it back--the US Mint is selling the sheets of 32 for $102 (they weren't on the website when I needed them in June)
http://www.moneyfactorystore.gov/2currencysheetsbeptestsheet.aspx
 
2013-10-14 07:38:23 PM

AliceBToklasLives: It's more like measuring in yards without the yardstick existing, which is exactly how we measure in miles (I don't think there's a milestick, except in some farkers' dreams).


The mile is based upon 1000 paces. Which is infinitely more useful than a kilometer, which is based upon 1000 of "the distance traveled by light in a vacuum in 1/299,792,458 of a second".
 
2013-10-14 07:40:49 PM

OrangeSnapper: fredklein: gerbilpox: Granted, pennies should have been discontinued by the Treasury a long time ago. They cost more than 1 cent to make, so they (i.e., we taxpayers) lose money on each one

Um, it's not like they get used once and thrown away.

I really don't understand this 'get rid of the penny' nonsense. The cent is the basic unit for coinage. A nickel is '5 cents'. A dime is '10 cents'. A quarter is a quarter dollar, or... 25 cents. If you get rid of the penny, there will be no coin for the basic unit. That's like measuring distances in miles, but the mile itself not existing. Or measuring capacity in gallons,, but not having any gallon jugs.

...or measuring oil in barrels, despite not actually putting it into barrels.


But barrels do actually exist.
 
2013-10-14 10:18:26 PM

fredklein: AliceBToklasLives: It's more like measuring in yards without the yardstick existing, which is exactly how we measure in miles (I don't think there's a milestick, except in some farkers' dreams).

The mile is based upon 1000 paces. Which is infinitely more useful than a kilometer, which is based upon 1000 of "the distance traveled by light in a vacuum in 1/299,792,458 of a second".


How do you figure that a mile is based on 1000 paces? A yard is about one pace, but there are 1760 yards to a mile. However, a meter is roughly a yard and there are 1000 meters in a kilometer. So actually there are 1000 paces in a kilometer, but not in a mile.

As far as measurements being useful, the metric system revolves around water. 1 cubic centimeter (linear measure) equals 1 mL (volume) and you can easily multiply that by 1000 to get 1 L, which is equivalent to 1 kg (mass) of water. The mass of one cubic meter of water is 1 metric ton.
 
2013-10-15 02:52:38 AM

gerbilpox: I'm more irritated that they won't accept pennies now. They aren't rare like $2 bills, half-dollars, and dollar coins.

Metro bus riders deposited more than 1.9 million of them in the last fiscal year.

If the riders are using them that much, deal with it! What are they going to do if someone only has enough cash for the fare with pennies included? Say, "tough shiat, go pound bricks"? Actually, that's probably exactly what they'll do.

Granted, pennies should have been discontinued by the Treasury a long time ago. They cost more than 1 cent to make, so they (i.e., we taxpayers) lose money on each one. Nonetheless, they're still around, and Metro doesn't have to make them, just accept them. Again, deal with it!


as currency they are useless, as a great base metal for working, after the rest of the world falls apart they will be worth...um gold...
 
2013-10-15 08:09:28 AM

wallywam1: fredklein: AliceBToklasLives: It's more like measuring in yards without the yardstick existing, which is exactly how we measure in miles (I don't think there's a milestick, except in some farkers' dreams).

The mile is based upon 1000 paces. Which is infinitely more useful than a kilometer, which is based upon 1000 of "the distance traveled by light in a vacuum in 1/299,792,458 of a second".

How do you figure that a mile is based on 1000 paces?


The Romans, when marching their armies through Europe, were the first to use the unit of long distance mille passuum (literally "a thousand paces" in Latin, where each pace or stride was two steps). - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mile#Roman_mile

A yard is about one pace

Um, no. Not unless you are a midget. A pace is two steps.

As far as measurements being useful, the metric system revolves around water. 1 cubic centimeter (linear measure) equals 1 mL (volume) and you can easily multiply that by 1000 to get 1 L, which is equivalent to 1 kg (mass) of water. The mass of one cubic meter of water is 1 metric ton.

And all that's fine... if you're in a laboratory. Or in the engineering field. For 'real life' issues, Imperial measures are better.
 
2013-10-15 08:54:44 AM

fredklein: wallywam1: fredklein: AliceBToklasLives: It's more like measuring in yards without the yardstick existing, which is exactly how we measure in miles (I don't think there's a milestick, except in some farkers' dreams).

The mile is based upon 1000 paces. Which is infinitely more useful than a kilometer, which is based upon 1000 of "the distance traveled by light in a vacuum in 1/299,792,458 of a second".

How do you figure that a mile is based on 1000 paces?

The Romans, when marching their armies through Europe, were the first to use the unit of long distance mille passuum (literally "a thousand paces" in Latin, where each pace or stride was two steps). - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mile#Roman_mile

A yard is about one pace

Um, no. Not unless you are a midget. A pace is two steps.

As far as measurements being useful, the metric system revolves around water. 1 cubic centimeter (linear measure) equals 1 mL (volume) and you can easily multiply that by 1000 to get 1 L, which is equivalent to 1 kg (mass) of water. The mass of one cubic meter of water is 1 metric ton.

And all that's fine... if you're in a laboratory. Or in the engineering field. For 'real life' issues, Imperial measures are better.


A pace is one step, not two. There is no more Roman army marching through Europe. The modern use of the word is one step.

But okay, I'll concede a tie on that one. What about wrenches and sockets that many people use every day? 17/32", 5/8", 7/16", 1/2". It's all over the place. On the metric side they are all in mm and go in numerical order (e.g. 10, 11, 12). Much easier to figure out.
 
2013-10-15 01:21:58 PM
when I worked at the federal reserve, I cashed my paycheck in two dollar bills
much to the frustration of the bank teller my miffed wife took them to
heh
 
2013-10-15 07:21:41 PM

wallywam1: fredklein: wallywam1: fredklein: AliceBToklasLives: It's more like measuring in yards without the yardstick existing, which is exactly how we measure in miles (I don't think there's a milestick, except in some farkers' dreams).

The mile is based upon 1000 paces. Which is infinitely more useful than a kilometer, which is based upon 1000 of "the distance traveled by light in a vacuum in 1/299,792,458 of a second".

How do you figure that a mile is based on 1000 paces?

The Romans, when marching their armies through Europe, were the first to use the unit of long distance mille passuum (literally "a thousand paces" in Latin, where each pace or stride was two steps). - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mile#Roman_mile

A yard is about one pace

Um, no. Not unless you are a midget. A pace is two steps.

As far as measurements being useful, the metric system revolves around water. 1 cubic centimeter (linear measure) equals 1 mL (volume) and you can easily multiply that by 1000 to get 1 L, which is equivalent to 1 kg (mass) of water. The mass of one cubic meter of water is 1 metric ton.

And all that's fine... if you're in a laboratory. Or in the engineering field. For 'real life' issues, Imperial measures are better.

A pace is one step, not two.



noun

1a single step taken when walking or running.
a unit of length representing the distance between two successive steps in walking.
- http://oxforddictionaries.com/us/definition/american_english/pace''

pace 1 (ps)
n.
1. A step made in walking; a stride.
2. A unit of length equal to 30 inches (0.76 meter).
3. The distance spanned by a step or stride, especially:
a. The modern version of the Roman pace, measuring five English feet. Also called geometric pace.
- http://www.thefreedictionary.com/pace

Gee. 5 feet x 100 = 5000 feet. And 1 mile = 5280 feet. Pretty close. Almost like they are related.

There is no more Roman army marching through Europe. The modern use of the word is one step.

The Internet is not a printing press. This, the Freedom Of The Press doesn't apply to it, Right?

The point is, if I'm in the lab and need to convert units, then Metric is very handy. But if I'm in the real world, Imperial is handy. It's almost like one was designed to be useful for scientists, whiel the other grew out of real-world situations.

But okay, I'll concede a tie on that one. What about wrenches and sockets that many people use every day? 17/32", 5/8", 7/16", 1/2". It's all over the place. On the metric side they are all in mm and go in numerical order (e.g. 10, 11, 12). Much easier to figure out.

The Imperial sockets are in order, too. They just simplify the fractions (like they teach to my 6th grade daughter) when possible.
 
2013-10-15 07:22:32 PM

fredklein: 5 feet x 100 = 5000 feet.


Er, of course I mean "5 feet x 1000 = 5000 feet."
 
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