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(Philly.com)   Breathing: is anything simpler? Well I'm afraid you've been doing it all wrong   (philly.com) divider line 41
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5892 clicks; posted to Geek » on 13 Oct 2013 at 4:12 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



41 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2013-10-13 02:34:17 PM  
Through my teeth and filtered by a pair of subby's mom's used under garments?  if I'm not right, I don't wanna be wrong.
 
2013-10-13 03:21:48 PM  
I wonder if this is related to my contant blackou
 
2013-10-13 03:43:25 PM  
"So go ahead, take a deep breath... slowly... with your diaphragm. It will keep your body in neutral, allow you to move better, and decrease injury risk."

Injury...from breathing?
 
2013-10-13 04:01:39 PM  
In my defense, I started at a very young age, and was desperate to learn how very quickly...
 
2013-10-13 04:30:07 PM  
"When we breathe properly, we engage our diaphragm, the large muscle under our ribs. A healthy person should primarily use the diaphragm, the main muscle involved in correct breathing. "


So everybody breathes properly?  Since from what I am aware, it is the only muscle involved in breathing exclusively.
 
2013-10-13 04:31:08 PM  

KarmicDisaster: "So go ahead, take a deep breath... slowly... with your diaphragm. It will keep your body in neutral, allow you to move better, and decrease injury risk."

Injury...from breathing?



Can happen.  Especially under physiological stress.  After all breathing at the macro level is just a mechanical pressure change that moves gas.  Bad things can happen if done poorly, or the containers of said gas are structurally weak.
 
2013-10-13 04:33:02 PM  

mrlewish: "When we breathe properly, we engage our diaphragm, the large muscle under our ribs. A healthy person should primarily use the diaphragm, the main muscle involved in correct breathing. "


So everybody breathes properly?  Since from what I am aware, it is the only muscle involved in breathing exclusively.



Yes, but accessory muscles are used in the same way to augment the process.
 
2013-10-13 04:40:23 PM  
When I exercise or play sports...I breathe right.  (I've been trained how)
But it's when I sleep I don't breathe well.  (no it's not apnea)


Sometimes I wonder about the efficiency of oxygen conversion.
Which specialist would know about that?
 
2013-10-13 04:44:04 PM  
So you really can't breathe without a Tic Tac in your mouth?
 
2013-10-13 04:55:42 PM  

KarmicDisaster: "So go ahead, take a deep breath... slowly... with your diaphragm. It will keep your body in neutral, allow you to move better, and decrease injury risk."

Injury...from breathing?


I've sneezed and put my back out.

I operated for years under the impression that I had asthma, when it turns out it was most or even entirely my posture that was restricting my breathing (feeling like not being able to breathe, while still blowing 700 on the peak flow meter was a hint). I haven't used the inhaler in over a year.
 
2013-10-13 04:57:29 PM  
Perhaps some smartass could write an article about beating your heart all wrong.
 
2013-10-13 05:04:50 PM  

KarmicDisaster: "So go ahead, take a deep breath... slowly... with your diaphragm. It will keep your body in neutral, allow you to move better, and decrease injury risk."

Injury...from breathing?


Imagine the call into the office the next day?
 
2013-10-13 05:06:49 PM  

rogue49: When I exercise or play sports...I breathe right. (I've been trained how)
But it's when I sleep I don't breathe well.


I've found focusing on nothing but your breathing as you're falling asleep helps a lot, and it also is the best method for falling asleep fast.
 
2013-10-13 05:20:54 PM  

KarmicDisaster: "So go ahead, take a deep breath... slowly... with your diaphragm. It will keep your body in neutral, allow you to move better, and decrease injury risk."

Injury...from breathing?


You just know some baseball players have ended up on the 15 day DL due to improper breathing.  Some players can't wake up without injuring something.
 
2013-10-13 05:25:32 PM  
When do we get the article on proper sneezing, swallowing and blinking our eyelids because those things have always given me trouble too.
 
2013-10-13 05:34:12 PM  
I addressed this very issue at the physiotherapist this week. Apparently my breathing is too shallow and it causes all kinds of muscle tension.

/not subby
 
2013-10-13 05:34:28 PM  

Virtuoso80: KarmicDisaster: "So go ahead, take a deep breath... slowly... with your diaphragm. It will keep your body in neutral, allow you to move better, and decrease injury risk."

Injury...from breathing?

I've sneezed and put my back out.

Sounds

painful. However I'm not sure that her course covers sneezing, that is in the graduate level seminar on exotic forms of non-regular breathing.
 
2013-10-13 05:40:10 PM  
The autonomic nervous system, how does it work?
 
2013-10-13 05:52:11 PM  
Idiot wind, blowing every time you move your mouth
Blowing down the backroads headin' south
Idiot wind, blowing every time you move your teeth
You're an idiot, babe
It's a wonder that you still know how to breathe
Bob Dylan - Idiot Wind
 
2013-10-13 06:04:20 PM  
www.containsmoderateperil.com

Talk less, breathe more.
 
2013-10-13 06:29:29 PM  
Everyone in this thread is now breathing manually.
 
2013-10-13 06:30:10 PM  

BafflerMeal: mrlewish: "When we breathe properly, we engage our diaphragm, the large muscle under our ribs. A healthy person should primarily use the diaphragm, the main muscle involved in correct breathing. "


So everybody breathes properly?  Since from what I am aware, it is the only muscle involved in breathing exclusively.


Yes, but accessory muscles are used in the same way to augment the process.


People who have never run before will get gut aches when they start because they breathe wrong using too much chest muscles etc and not exhaling completely.  Also unhealthy people have "labored" breathing due to things like obesity, smoking, etc where the diaphragm can't act normally and they end up using shoulder and rib movement to essentially gasp for air and have irregular breathing.  Ever sat next to someone with labored breathing?
 
2013-10-13 06:31:35 PM  
Crap, now I'm dizzy.
 
2013-10-13 06:50:51 PM  
New age hipster crap that functions on reality-by-dictation and not reality-by-science.  Pass.

Reality is better and weirder than fantasy.  You can keep it.
 
2013-10-13 07:11:29 PM  
So... we all have a malfunctioning brainstem, then?

Or is "breathing" yet another thing we have to add to the list of things we've got to waste all the hours of the day paying attention to?
 
2013-10-13 07:18:52 PM  

wildcardjack: Perhaps some smartass could write an article about beating your heart all wrong.


My heart beats wrong, and as a result I often have trouble breathing because my lungs fill with fluid. Good times. At least I'll have health insurance in January.
 
2013-10-13 07:29:32 PM  
Candygram4Mongo: In my defense, I started at a very young age, and was desperate to learn how very quickly...

I was a prodigy.

// exhale exhale EXHALE!
 
2013-10-13 07:40:58 PM  

I Like Bread: Everyone in this thread is now breathing manually.


i291.photobucket.com

Everyone is now self conscious of their eyes blinking.
 
2013-10-13 07:46:23 PM  
Musical training and scuba lessons are the first time that most people are really aware of the difference.

I blame cartoons - whenever a character takes a deep breath (sniffing flowers, whatever), they suck in their gut and puff out their chest.
 
2013-10-13 08:24:53 PM  
Subby here.  I found this article highly amusing because it completely failed to address the time we are most likely to forget to breathe.

Have you ever seen anyone giving a speech or presentation, that starts shaking?  Their voice is quavering?  They seem faint?

They have forgotten to breathe.

Public presentation is hard if you haven't had practice, and the most important thing is to breathe.

The second most important thing is to get them to send you money.
 
2013-10-13 08:40:00 PM  

Thanks for the Meme-ries: I Like Bread: Everyone in this thread is now breathing manually.

[i291.photobucket.com image 400x270]

Everyone is now self conscious of their eyes blinking.


I kept expecting this (scroll down for link):

upload.wikimedia.org
1.bp.blogspot.com
upload.wikimedia.org

[Link].
 
2013-10-13 08:44:02 PM  

ArcadianRefugee: Thanks for the Meme-ries: I Like Bread: Everyone in this thread is now breathing manually.

[i291.photobucket.com image 400x270]

Everyone is now self conscious of their eyes blinking.

I kept expecting this (scroll down for link):

[upload.wikimedia.org image 150x150]
[1.bp.blogspot.com image 185x112]
[upload.wikimedia.org image 200x75]

[Link].


Whoa whoa whoa, before this goes any further off the rails let's redirect it to something more fun!(SFW once you watch it for a few seconds)
 
2013-10-13 08:45:44 PM  

ArcadianRefugee: Thanks for the Meme-ries: I Like Bread: Everyone in this thread is now breathing manually.

[i291.photobucket.com image 400x270]

Everyone is now self conscious of their eyes blinking.

I kept expecting this (scroll down for link):

[upload.wikimedia.org image 150x150]
[1.bp.blogspot.com image 185x112]
[upload.wikimedia.org image 200x75]

[Link].


Everybody loves Lasik Eye Surgery, but no one wants to watch the clinical trials...
 
2013-10-13 08:46:09 PM  

Marcus Aurelius: Subby here.  I found this article highly amusing because it completely failed to address the time we are most likely to forget to breathe.

Have you ever seen anyone giving a speech or presentation, that starts shaking?  Their voice is quavering?  They seem faint?

They have forgotten to breathe.

Public presentation is hard if you haven't had practice, and the most important thing is to breathe.

The second most important thing is to get them to send you money.


that and

FrancoFile: Musical training and scuba lessons are the first time that most people are really aware of the difference.

I blame cartoons - whenever a character takes a deep breath (sniffing flowers, whatever), they suck in their gut and puff out their chest.


Apparently the bashers in this thread have done none of those things.  I already added in running.  For me learning how to run (which I don't do anymore strangely) was about learning how to breathe right.  And that was AFTER the musical training.

And then 20 years into it, I had to relearn.  I hadn't run much in a few years and hadn't done much in the way of music either.  I was having difficulty sleeping.  I listened to a talk from some dude speaking about PTSD and stress and half of it was about breathing.  I started simple breathing exercises in bed and it cut I'd say an average of an hour off of the time it takes me to get to sleep.  You can't think about two things at once it turns out.  I started concentrating on deep breaths in and then good exhale and it calms you right down.  I hadn't ever noticed just how shallow and rapid my breathing was and how rapid my heartrate was when stressed out.  I started the breathing exercises and the number one thing it does is focus your mind.  My heart rate falls.  Sometimes I drift back into the thinking of the day's stresses and have to try several times to concentrate on breathing.  But if I can keep focus, it only takes 5 minutes for sleep.  Sometimes getting that 5 minutes takes an hour but that's better than the 3 hours it used to take.  Relaxing can be hard work.
 
2013-10-13 09:01:16 PM  

ReapTheChaos: When do we get the article on proper sneezing, swallowing and blinking our eyelids because those things have always given me trouble too.


Actually... If the timing is off when some people sneeze it can contract the heart out of proper sequence and cause some major trouble. It squeezes the heart and won't let it expand for a brief moment, but it's enough to cause severe pain and throw the timing of the heart off for a little while, ruining the rest of the day. Happens to me every couple of months and has put me in the emergency room a few times. I've got a spinal injury issue with sneezing too. It's a wonderful thing when you sneeze too hard in a bad stance and lose the use of your legs for a bit. heh
 
2013-10-13 09:08:18 PM  

brandent: And then 20 years into it, I had to relearn.  I hadn't run much in a few years and hadn't done much in the way of music either.  I was having difficulty sleeping.  I listened to a talk from some dude speaking about PTSD and stress and half of it was about breathing.  I started simple breathing exercises in bed and it cut I'd say an average of an hour off of the time it takes me to get to sleep.  You can't think about two things at once it turns out.  I started concentrating on deep breaths in and then good exhale and it calms you right down.  I hadn't ever noticed just how shallow and rapid my breathing was and how rapid my heartrate was when stressed out.  I started the breathing exercises and the number one thing it does is focus your mind.  My heart rate falls.  Sometimes I drift back into the thinking of the day's stresses and have to try several times to concentrate on breathing.  But if I can keep focus, it only takes 5 minutes for sleep.   Sometimes getting that 5 minutes takes an hour but that's better than the 3 hours it used to take.  Relaxing can be hard work.


Perhaps your tendency towards short, rushed breaths and anxiety is related to your inability to use the carriage return key.
 
2013-10-13 09:18:56 PM  

talbotlynx: ReapTheChaos: When do we get the article on proper sneezing, swallowing and blinking our eyelids because those things have always given me trouble too.

Actually... If the timing is off when some people sneeze it can contract the heart out of proper sequence and cause some major trouble. It squeezes the heart and won't let it expand for a brief moment, but it's enough to cause severe pain and throw the timing of the heart off for a little while, ruining the rest of the day. Happens to me every couple of months and has put me in the emergency room a few times. I've got a spinal injury issue with sneezing too. It's a wonderful thing when you sneeze too hard in a bad stance and lose the use of your legs for a bit. heh


The worst thing I've had happen with a sneeze is when I was pissing and it shot all over the place.
 
2013-10-13 09:19:03 PM  
Ok... poop is coming out.
 
2013-10-13 09:28:34 PM  

Theaetetus: brandent: And then 20 years into it, I had to relearn.  I hadn't run much in a few years and hadn't done much in the way of music either.  I was having difficulty sleeping.  I listened to a talk from some dude speaking about PTSD and stress and half of it was about breathing.  I started simple breathing exercises in bed and it cut I'd say an average of an hour off of the time it takes me to get to sleep.  You can't think about two things at once it turns out.  I started concentrating on deep breaths in and then good exhale and it calms you right down.  I hadn't ever noticed just how shallow and rapid my breathing was and how rapid my heartrate was when stressed out.  I started the breathing exercises and the number one thing it does is focus your mind.  My heart rate falls.  Sometimes I drift back into the thinking of the day's stresses and have to try several times to concentrate on breathing.  But if I can keep focus, it only takes 5 minutes for sleep.   Sometimes getting that 5 minutes takes an hour but that's better than the 3 hours it used to take.  Relaxing can be hard work.

Perhaps your tendency towards short, rushed breaths and anxiety is related to your inability to use the carriage return key.


Faulkner is hard work.
 
2013-10-13 09:54:50 PM  
FTFA:  Breathe in, breathe out, breathe in, breathe out...

They see what you did there, article author.

www.guitarmasterclass.net
 
2013-10-14 03:44:35 PM  
Yes, most people breathe incorrectly.  Most people sit poorly, lift incorrectly, and walk inefficiently.
 
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