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(BBC)   Roman bathhouse still in use after 2,000 years. Some earthquake damage repaired by the Ottomans In 14th century, but otherwise in good nick   (bbc.co.uk) divider line 47
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12272 clicks; posted to Main » on 13 Oct 2013 at 3:00 PM (26 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-10-13 03:03:16 PM
I hope it bought Nick dinner first.
 
2013-10-13 03:03:25 PM
Seems like we forgot how to build things that last. Now you're lucky if you get 30 years out of a big public building.
 
2013-10-13 03:06:42 PM
I love continuity of culture.
 
ecl
2013-10-13 03:08:01 PM
No women?
 
2013-10-13 03:08:42 PM
the aqueduct?
 
2013-10-13 03:09:27 PM
Ottomans are good.

They don't block the view and can be used when you have too many guests.
 
2013-10-13 03:10:00 PM

MrEricSir: Seems like we forgot how to build things that last. Now you're lucky if you get 30 years out of a big public building.


That's more about the political/construction corruption continuum.
 
2013-10-13 03:10:03 PM
Good nick? What is nick? Condition? Neighborhood?
 
2013-10-13 03:10:55 PM
bathousing in algeria could be a cottage industry
 
2013-10-13 03:12:05 PM
What have the Romans ever done for us?

Farking Romans scared of a little cold and so didn't conquer Scotland to give us nice viaducts, roads, bathhouses, coliseums with fightin' in them, orgies, candles, noses, pizza, pasta, opera, scooters, fountains, Mussolini etc etc.

Bastards!
 
2013-10-13 03:13:28 PM

InfrasonicTom: MrEricSir: Seems like we forgot how to build things that last. Now you're lucky if you get 30 years out of a big public building.

That's more about the political/construction corruption continuum.


Pretty much the bean counters decided its cheaper to make a new one every 30 years than to build one that will last near infinitely.
 
2013-10-13 03:13:31 PM
Algeria?

The plug holes must be where they get fibre for carpets.
 
2013-10-13 03:15:05 PM

MrEricSir: Seems like we forgot how to build things that last. Now you're lucky if you get 30 years out of a big public building.


You get more money if you can rebuild big buildings every now and then. A once of cash income from building something that'll last millennia is seen as unambitious and lazy these days. Remember, Greed is Good.
 
2013-10-13 03:16:49 PM
Part of me thinks this is really cool, another part of me thinks they should leave the site alone god dammit!

Though bath houses are sure in no small number. Wherever the Romans went they built toilet facilities and baths. They weren't going to give up luxury just because they were on the front lines.
 
2013-10-13 03:18:48 PM
Notice there's no women there.  Muslim's won't allow it.
 
2013-10-13 03:20:05 PM

MrEricSir: Seems like we forgot how to build things that last. Now you're lucky if you get 30 years out of a big public building.


I don't know about that. We have quite a few public buildings that are still being used after 90-100 years around here. A standard drywall & wood frame structure can be expected to last about 30 years before it starts needing serious maintenance, but concrete, cinder block, and steel constructions tend to last considerably longer if they're taken care of.

From a practical point of view, the useful life span of most buildings is limited less by durability and more by adaptability. That Roman bathhouse will never be anything other than a bathhouse. Structures built 50-70 years ago are really showing their age because they often lack basic features that we consider more important today: fire/tornado/earthquake/hurricane resilience, high capacity electrical systems, adequate data cabling, HVAC and parking capacity, etc. Things become obsolete way faster than they wear out. Some features have outlived their usefulness, like nuclear bomb resilience, and some of the things they did for that make it extremely hard to retrofit modern technology.
 
2013-10-13 03:24:39 PM

Trius2: Part of me thinks this is really cool, another part of me thinks they should leave the site alone god dammit!

Though bath houses are sure in no small number. Wherever the Romans went they built toilet facilities and baths. They weren't going to give up luxury just because they were on the front lines.


The best way to preserve a building is to prevent it from being derelict.
 
2013-10-13 03:27:23 PM

marius2: Part of me thinks this is really cool, another part of me thinks they should leave the site alone god dammit!


So something explicitly created to be used should not be used even though it is still in working order?
 
2013-10-13 03:29:06 PM

MrEricSir: Seems like we forgot how to build things that last. Now you're lucky if you get 30 years out of a big public building.


If we built things to last, there'd be nothing left for any of us to do. We are simply too efficient at making things, from consumer products to public works projects, where one man with a tractor can get more done in a day than 100 slaves with shovels can get done in a week a few thousand years ago.

Thus, planned obsolescence keeps people employed. Everything is meant to be disposable, so we all have something to do -- make more stuff to replace current stuff. That's Capitalism for ya.
 
2013-10-13 03:36:45 PM

MrEricSir: Seems like we forgot how to build things that last. Now you're lucky if you get 30 years out of a big public building.


That's typically not the fault of the building itself, but the infrastructure within it. Once the wiring, plumbing, heating system, etc. get outdated, its cheaper to tear down and rebuild than it is to retrofit the entire place with new systems.
 
2013-10-13 03:39:43 PM

Sim Tree: Good nick? What is nick? Condition? Neighborhood?


"Condition"

Do try to learn the Queen's English
 
2013-10-13 03:42:08 PM

phalamir: marius2: Part of me thinks this is really cool, another part of me thinks they should leave the site alone god dammit!

So something explicitly created to be used should not be used even though it is still in working order?


Pfft, what's this thing doing behind glass? Pour some wine in it and used it at your next party!

upload.wikimedia.org
 
2013-10-13 03:48:19 PM

Fubini: MrEricSir: Seems like we forgot how to build things that last. Now you're lucky if you get 30 years out of a big public building.

I don't know about that. We have quite a few public buildings that are still being used after 90-100 years around here. A standard drywall & wood frame structure can be expected to last about 30 years before it starts needing serious maintenance, but concrete, cinder block, and steel constructions tend to last considerably longer if they're taken care of.

From a practical point of view, the useful life span of most buildings is limited less by durability and more by adaptability. That Roman bathhouse will never be anything other than a bathhouse. Structures built 50-70 years ago are really showing their age because they often lack basic features that we consider more important today: fire/tornado/earthquake/hurricane resilience, high capacity electrical systems, adequate data cabling, HVAC and parking capacity, etc. Things become obsolete way faster than they wear out. Some features have outlived their usefulness, like nuclear bomb resilience, and some of the things they did for that make it extremely hard to retrofit modern technology.


Aren't a bunch of holes for data cables becoming outdated as wireless technology continues to improve?  I know you'll never have a wireless server farm, but what percentage of buildings actually need a bunch of Jeffries tubes for ethernet cables?  I remember a few years ago Martha Stewart was gloating in some magazine article about how her mansion was so much more modern than Bill Gates' for that very reason.
 
2013-10-13 04:01:58 PM
Amazing what slave labor can accomplish.
 
2013-10-13 04:13:21 PM

Nogale: Amazing what slave labor can accomplish.


Just ask the Walton family.
 
2013-10-13 04:20:23 PM
I love happy endings.
 
2013-10-13 04:21:22 PM
It belongs in a museum!
 
2013-10-13 04:23:10 PM
Fun fact: Ancient Roman baths were bacteria infested fecal stewpots.  One Roman letter writer (I can't remember which, but it might have been Pliny the Younger) said that anyone going to the baths should first check himself for cuts or wounds, because if he had any it was sure that they would turn gangrenous in the baths.
 
2013-10-13 04:29:13 PM

Koodz: Aren't a bunch of holes for data cables becoming outdated as wireless technology continues to improve?  I know you'll never have a wireless server farm, but what percentage of buildings actually need a bunch of Jeffries tubes for ethernet cables?  I remember a few years ago Martha Stewart was gloating in some magazine article about how her mansion was so much more modern than Bill Gates' for that very reason.


Its going to be a long time before wireless technology completely replaces wired.  There's some serious limits on range (WiFi) and overall throughput (LTE, etc), as well as capacity issues on both LAN and WAN wireless technologies.

While you might not need a cable going to every cubicle, you still need quite a few going to the various access points that provide the wireless signal.  All of the new faster wireless LAN technologies are based on 5Ghz and in some limited cases 60Ghz technologies, both of which have horrible range in a typical office environment.
 
2013-10-13 04:37:00 PM
the women were tired of leaving there pregnant from the water.
 
2013-10-13 04:52:39 PM

Nogale: Amazing what slave labor can accomplish.


Relevant Louis C.K.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bkjmzEEQUlE
 
2013-10-13 04:54:17 PM

Talos: Notice there's no women there.  Muslim's won't allow it.


A bathhouse without women?  That's gay.
 
2013-10-13 04:57:30 PM

WTP 2: the women were tired of leaving there pregnant from the water.


So why try to thwart Neptune's advances? Once upon a time women would throw themselves at a god, no matter what form he took. Why should Jove get all the fun? Alas only in Japan did the Kraken get any love. In Rome he had to use bath house water.
 
2013-10-13 05:02:16 PM

opiumpoopy: Sim Tree: Good nick? What is nick? Condition? Neighborhood?

"Condition"

Do try to learn the Queen's English


Indeed, sir. "Nick" is English English as opposed to American English
 
2013-10-13 05:38:36 PM

Nogale: Amazing what slave labor can accomplish.


Romans didn't use slaves to build things.  Slaves were for working in fields and houses.  Likely not educated nor skilled enough to do construction.  Either the soldiery or trained masons would have built it, though the soldiery were pretty skilled at construction, given that they were expected to build just about everything they needed from scratch out on the frontier, as well as the roads on their way there.

Just about everything would have been made with concrete and brick, then faced with smooth concrete or stone.  In those pictures, the columns with the nice, neat, longish, rectangular bricks would be the original Roman brickwork along with the smooth parts of the lower walls, and the big, rough, uneven, squarish bricks in the walls would likely be what the Ottomans put in.
 
2013-10-13 05:39:41 PM

Plant Rights Activist: the aqueduct?


www.theshiznit.co.uk

I read that in his voice.

/Chester A. Arthur
 
2013-10-13 05:49:20 PM
"Did someone say bathhouse?"
www.malecelebnews.com
 
F42
2013-10-13 06:28:47 PM
Tip amount: Eyring recommends tipping $5 to a DJ for one song

ah! As if.
 
2013-10-13 07:44:20 PM

MrEricSir: Seems like we forgot how to build things that last. Now you're lucky if you get 30 years out of a big public building.


Keep in mind that this is one building out of hundreds of thousands the Romans built over hundreds of years, and that (if you look at the pics) it's in pretty rough shape.  The number of Roman buildings which have survived intact over two thousand years are a handful and all of those have been in continuous use (the Pantheon and Roman Curia leap to mind).
 
2013-10-13 07:53:40 PM

MrEricSir: Seems like we forgot how to build things that last. Now you're lucky if you get 30 years out of a big public building.


I would mention it's because of all the government regulations in place, but I'd be trolling.

/yes, i hate the government regs
//yes, I'm aware why they're necessary
 
2013-10-13 08:00:31 PM

tillerman35: Fun fact: Ancient Roman baths were bacteria infested fecal stewpots.  One Roman letter writer (I can't remember which, but it might have been Pliny the Younger) said that anyone going to the baths should first check himself for cuts or wounds, because if he had any it was sure that they would turn gangrenous in the baths.


It was Celsus.  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aulus_Cornelius_Celsus and that only referred to the ones that were not taken care of, and the water was left stagnant.
 
2013-10-13 09:05:31 PM
Snails or oysters?
 
2013-10-14 12:07:55 AM

marius2: tillerman35: Fun fact: Ancient Roman baths were bacteria infested fecal stewpots.  One Roman letter writer (I can't remember which, but it might have been Pliny the Younger) said that anyone going to the baths should first check himself for cuts or wounds, because if he had any it was sure that they would turn gangrenous in the baths.

It was Celsus.  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aulus_Cornelius_Celsus and that only referred to the ones that were not taken care of, and the water was left stagnant.


Wow, cool info on Celsus. Thanks marius2.
 
2013-10-14 01:10:01 AM

balancing act: marius2: tillerman35: Fun fact: Ancient Roman baths were bacteria infested fecal stewpots.  One Roman letter writer (I can't remember which, but it might have been Pliny the Younger) said that anyone going to the baths should first check himself for cuts or wounds, because if he had any it was sure that they would turn gangrenous in the baths.

It was Celsus.  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aulus_Cornelius_Celsus and that only referred to the ones that were not taken care of, and the water was left stagnant.

Wow, cool info on Celsus. Thanks marius2.


No problem :) Feel free to ask any questions, it's what I do!
 
2013-10-14 01:54:05 AM

marius2: tillerman35: Fun fact: Ancient Roman baths were bacteria infested fecal stewpots.  One Roman letter writer (I can't remember which, but it might have been Pliny the Younger) said that anyone going to the baths should first check himself for cuts or wounds, because if he had any it was sure that they would turn gangrenous in the baths.

It was Celsus.  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aulus_Cornelius_Celsus and that only referred to the ones that were not taken care of, and the water was left stagnant.


Quite possibly a quote from or reference to Celsus, but I distinctly remember it being epistolary.  I'm sure I never read anything of Celsus' at all.  But I'm dredging this up from thirty years ago, so it's as likely to have been something I read in a history book.

But thanks for the reference.  I'll have some fun tracking down the relevant texts.

If you haven't already read it, I'd also recommend "On Ancient Medicine" by Hippocrates.  It's amazing both from a "what they got wrong" and a "what they got right" point of view, and some of the general musings and philosophy thrown in here and there are as relevant today as they were thousands of years ago.  Pretty cool stuff.
 
2013-10-14 10:50:51 AM
tillerman35:

Quite possibly a quote from or reference to Celsus, but I distinctly remember it being epistolary.  I'm sure I never read anything of Celsus' at all.  But I'm dredging this up from thirty years ago, so it's as likely to have been something I read in a history book.

But thanks for the reference.  I'll have some fun tracking down the relevant texts.

If you haven't already read it, I'd also recommend "On Ancient Medicine" by Hippocrates.  It's amazing both from a "what they got wrong" and a "what they got right" point of view, and some of the general musings and philosophy thrown in here and there are as relevant today as they were thousands of years ago.  Pretty cool stuff.


Yeah, it could have just been a blurb in a book that you read. Pliny could have mentioned something similar, I just don't remember it. I actually have only read blurbs from Hippocrates, I'll definitely check that out. Thanks for the suggestion!
 
2013-10-14 11:06:07 AM

Kriggerel: Snails or oysters?


some people like both

it's a question of taste, not appetite
 
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