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(ABC Local)   Chicago speed cameras clock 205,000 citations in 39 days. Who would have thought there would be that many old Chevys still on the road?   (abclocal.go.com) divider line 52
    More: Interesting, Chicago, Chicago Department of Transportation, speed cameras clock, speed cameras, Chicago speed cameras, Colorado Department of Transportation, expected number, William McKinley  
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3623 clicks; posted to Main » on 12 Oct 2013 at 12:52 PM (46 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-10-12 11:23:31 AM
...or '74 Dodge Monacos.
 
2013-10-12 12:25:01 PM

BunkyBrewman: ...or '74 Dodge Monacos.


Hit it!
 
2013-10-12 12:44:16 PM
blogs.computerworld.com

That seems an entirely reasonable number.

And if it's about revenue, not about safety, fine. I'm ok with taxing speeders extra.
 
2013-10-12 12:53:23 PM
Chicago trifecta in play.
 
2013-10-12 12:56:11 PM
Fines for violations are $35 for vehicles travelling 6-10 miles per hour over the posted speed limit while in a safety zone, and $100 for vehicles travelling 11 or more miles over the posted speed limit.

media.tumblr.com
 
2013-10-12 12:58:34 PM
The Children's Safety Zones are designated as within 1/8th of a mile from Chicago parks or schools.

The enforcement hours will be limited from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. in safety zones around schools on school days Monday through Friday; 7 a.m.-4 p.m.: 20 mph speed limit when children are present; 30 mph speed limit when no children are present; 4 p.m. to 7 p.m.: 30 mph speed limit

The enforcement hours around parks will be limited to only those hours parks are open (typically 6 a.m. to 11 p.m., seven days a week) with a 30 mph speed limit.



/Seems reasonable to me
//Reading the articles is sometimes informative.
 
2013-10-12 12:59:15 PM
Let me know when the fine process is automated Demolition Man style.
 
2013-10-12 01:00:59 PM
What I'm against is how the money collected by the cameras mostly goes to the camera companies and that the citizens of the cities/counties that implement these vote against the systems that they are still on the hook for paying these companies (that are usually out of state in the first place).

There is so little benefit for the cities and counties that use these systems.
 
2013-10-12 01:03:46 PM
Citation, you say?
carphotos.cardomain.com
 
2013-10-12 01:03:48 PM

AverageAmericanGuy: What I'm against is how the money collected by the cameras mostly goes to the camera companies and that the citizens of the cities/counties that implement these vote against the systems that they are still on the hook for paying these companies (that are usually out of state in the first place).

There is so little benefit for the cities and counties that use these systems.


If that were true, cities wouldn't be using them.
 
2013-10-12 01:05:02 PM
I wonder what the world will look like 20 or 30 years from now. Will every square foot of a city be monitored and automatic tickets issued for jaywalking, spitting on the sidewalk, loitering, littering, blocking the sidewalk, or any of the thousands of other crimes and offenses that are encompassed in a municipal code? If a big revenue stream is made possible, the infrastructure build out for a total police state will certainly be tempting.
 
2013-10-12 01:05:12 PM
But you can't blame the drivers. They're all on a mission from God.
 
2013-10-12 01:06:46 PM

jaybeezey: AverageAmericanGuy: What I'm against is how the money collected by the cameras mostly goes to the camera companies and that the citizens of the cities/counties that implement these vote against the systems that they are still on the hook for paying these companies (that are usually out of state in the first place).

There is so little benefit for the cities and counties that use these systems.

If that were true, cities wouldn't be using them.


I'll just leave this here.

http://articles.sun-sentinel.com/2011-08-14/news/fl-red-light-camera s- 20110814_1_red-light-camera-camera-programs-american-traffic-solutions
 
2013-10-12 01:07:55 PM
montanafesto.files.wordpress.com
 
2013-10-12 01:10:56 PM

jjorsett: If a big revenue stream is made possible, the infrastructure build out for a total police state will certainly be tempting.


You forget the price of paying the piper.  That infrastructure has to be maintained, and unless you shoot people who decide to vandalize your police state of cameras for littering and jaywalking, they will get vandalized.

/Speed cameras have $5,000 DSLR's in them.
//That camera could be yours if you approach from behind.
///and it will cost the more to replace the entire speed camera then just the cost of the physical camera.
 
2013-10-12 01:11:47 PM

pirho451: Citation, you say?
[carphotos.cardomain.com image 575x431]


Is that an engine from a Grand National shoe-horned into a Citation II?

/The line between genius and crazy is thin indeed
 
2013-10-12 01:11:54 PM

BunkyBrewman: ...or '74 Dodge Monacos.


It's that shiatbox dodge again!
 
2013-10-12 01:12:05 PM
Where is the statistic in the article about how many Chicago children were run over by a speeder on their way to school?  I'm not sure if wreckless drivers are the Chicago children's biggest safety concern.
 
2013-10-12 01:12:11 PM
Saw a Pontiac Phoenix the other day. The weird part is it was basically mint other than some Wal-Mart spinner hubcaps.
 
2013-10-12 01:14:20 PM
Best way to beat speed camera is to drive faster than it can take the picture.
 
2013-10-12 01:17:07 PM
is there more cameras in areas of higher income than lesser income areas, i'm betting so,more tickets would actually will be paid
 
2013-10-12 01:17:36 PM
I'm surprised that's all they got. I drove through Chicago for the first time last weekend. Not one car went the speed limit on the express way. Then most was under construction with reduced speed limits which didn't even slow drivers to the standard speed limits. I realize that's not what TFA was covering but I can't imagine they all become model drivers because they are in a residential area.
 
2013-10-12 01:18:11 PM

AverageAmericanGuy: What I'm against is how the money collected by the cameras mostly goes to the camera companies and that the citizens of the cities/counties that implement these vote against the systems that they are still on the hook for paying these companies (that are usually out of state in the first place).

There is so little benefit for the cities and counties that use these systems.


THIS! It would be much better if the cities operated the cameras themselves so all the collected money can go towards city services.
 
2013-10-12 01:19:05 PM
Someone say clocking?

s3.amazonaws.com

YEAAAAAA BOYYYYYYYYYYY!
 
2013-10-12 01:20:44 PM

TommyDeuce: pirho451: Citation, you say?
[carphotos.cardomain.com image 575x431]

Is that an engine from a Grand National shoe-horned into a Citation II?

/The line between genius and crazy is thin indeed


It is.

/It is
 
2013-10-12 01:21:26 PM

TommyDeuce: pirho451: Citation, you say?
[carphotos.cardomain.com image 575x431]

Is that an engine from a Grand National shoe-horned into a Citation II?

/The line between genius and crazy is thin indeed


Similar. That one was out of a Park Avenue Ultra.  The same guy did a number of other swaps, including a Caddy 4.9 V8.   http://baron512.net/
 
2013-10-12 01:22:48 PM

TheGogmagog: I'm surprised that's all they got. I drove through Chicago for the first time last weekend. Not one car went the speed limit on the express way. Then most was under construction with reduced speed limits which didn't even slow drivers to the standard speed limits. I realize that's not what TFA was covering but I can't imagine they all become model drivers because they are in a residential area.


So that was you!?  We were wondering who the hell was driving so slow on the expressway the other day.
 
2013-10-12 01:27:14 PM

Have_Brain: Where is the statistic in the article about how many Chicago children were run over by a speeder on their way to school?  I'm not sure if wreckless drivers are the Chicago children's biggest safety concern.


This.

Assuming this is a statistical issue, I would be okay with them if they were in plain sight. and had indicator lights when functioning. Also ticket from 5-15 mph, 1 mph tickets are bs. Same with red light cameras, ticket a half second after red and keep standard yellow timing. Just play fair.
 
2013-10-12 01:29:19 PM

Have_Brain: I'm not sure if wreckless drivers are the Chicago children's biggest safety concern.


Drivers who do not wreck certainly are not a significant safety concern. Just the opposite.
 
2013-10-12 01:33:54 PM

TheGogmagog: I'm surprised that's all they got. I drove through Chicago for the first time last weekend. Not one car went the speed limit on the express way. Then most was under construction with reduced speed limits which didn't even slow drivers to the standard speed limits. I realize that's not what TFA was covering but I can't imagine they all become model drivers because they are in a residential area.


Yeah.  They're even crazier than Michiganders.

Michiganders go 80-85 on a nice flat, swooping, well-designed (more or less.  There's some WTF's, but not at every single exit) section of usually rural freeway that's marked at 70.
Chicago(ans?  ers?) go 75 on a terrible urban freeway marked as 55 (or on one notable section of I-80, 45).

So I'm going 65 trying to balance "not getting killed" with "not getting a ticket because I have out-of-state plates".

/It'd be way safer if they'd just use the 85th percentile rule.
 
ows
2013-10-12 01:39:55 PM

fluffy2097: Fines for violations are $35 for vehicles travelling 6-10 miles per hour over the posted speed limit while in a safety zone, and $100 for vehicles travelling 11 or more miles over the posted speed limit.

[media.tumblr.com image 500x276]


10 over cost me $196
 
2013-10-12 01:45:13 PM

jjorsett: I wonder what the world will look like 20 or 30 years from now. Will every square foot of a city be monitored and automatic tickets issued for jaywalking, spitting on the sidewalk, loitering, littering, blocking the sidewalk, or any of the thousands of other crimes and offenses that are encompassed in a municipal code? If a big revenue stream is made possible, the infrastructure build out for a total police state will certainly be tempting.


"You have been fined one credit, jjorsett, for questioning the Revenue for Safety system."
faceplantreview.files.wordpress.com
 
2013-10-12 01:48:10 PM

Vangor: Have_Brain: I'm not sure if wreckless drivers are the Chicago children's biggest safety concern.

Drivers who do not wreck certainly are not a significant safety concern. Just the opposite.


Nope. Wrecked cars are only a danger to other drivers since they can obstruct the roadway.  It is pretty rare that a school child is run over by a wrecked car.  So it is the not yet wrecked, or wreckless, cars that are the concern.

Or my english not good.
 
2013-10-12 01:59:35 PM
I loved the comment on another site that told of an incident in England with speed cameras in which several men stole the plate off an enforcement vehicle and then sped thru the camera's venue about 50 times. letting the camera snap a pic of their plate and then send the ticket to the enforcement agency...simply hilarious!
 
2013-10-12 01:59:40 PM

TheGogmagog: I'm surprised that's all they got. I drove through Chicago for the first time last weekend. Not one car went the speed limit on the express way. Then most was under construction with reduced speed limits which didn't even slow drivers to the standard speed limits. I realize that's not what TFA was covering but I can't imagine they all become model drivers because they are in a residential area.


I love driving on the Chicago freeways.

If you go less than 90 you risk getting rear ended.
 
2013-10-12 02:00:52 PM

pirho451: Citation, you say?
[carphotos.cardomain.com image 575x431]


My first car was a 1980 orange Chevy Citation. Had no radio so I bought one and mounted it (sideways, of course) and speakers in the back. I loved that car; no computer and was a tank. Sadly, I had to total it. I called it the smashing pumpkin after that.

/would probably still be driving it in the winter if I still had it
//no rear defrost tho...
 
2013-10-12 02:02:13 PM

fluffy2097: jjorsett: If a big revenue stream is made possible, the infrastructure build out for a total police state will certainly be tempting.

You forget the price of paying the piper.  That infrastructure has to be maintained, and unless you shoot people who decide to vandalize your police state of cameras for littering and jaywalking, they will get vandalized.

/Speed cameras have $5,000 DSLR's in them.
//That camera could be yours if you approach from behind.
///and it will cost the more to replace the entire speed camera then just the cost of the physical camera.


$10,000 fine for damaging a camera. And all the other cameras would see you do it. That's the nice thing about carpeting a nation in surveillance, resistance/disobedience becomes impossible to get away with.
 
2013-10-12 02:02:34 PM
Speeding in a school zone? So, 30 m.p.h. in a 20 zone. Yep, you can do that in a Citation. 85 in a 55 zone? Not so likely.
 
2013-10-12 02:26:48 PM
i.imgur.com

Chevy Ci-TAAAAAAAAAAYYYYYYYYYY-shun!!
 
2013-10-12 02:36:23 PM
If people just wouldn't be dicks on the road, we'd all get there on time and no one would die.
No such thing as an accident, just someone being an asshole and getting themselves or someone else killed.
 
2013-10-12 03:09:25 PM

jjorsett: I wonder what the world will look like 20 or 30 years from now. Will every square foot of a city be monitored and automatic tickets issued for jaywalking, spitting on the sidewalk, loitering, littering, blocking the sidewalk, or any of the thousands of other crimes and offenses that are encompassed in a municipal code? If a big revenue stream is made possible, the infrastructure build out for a total police state will certainly be tempting.


One would hope not.  But information availability - which is really the only thing preventing at least the detection of such "transgressions" - is like a ratchet.  Information only becomes more available over time, not less.

If you were in charge of a municipality in a budget crunch (as they always seem to be), do you think it's easier for voters to accept a tax increase on everyone equally, or just those who are, in fact, criminals, no matter how harmless?  Once you can detect citable offenses, they are an easily seen as a source of revenue.

Private companies would be more than happy to foot the bill for the infrastructure as long as they get a cut.

So, you can sort of see where reasoning is taking us, as scary as it is, and as hopeful as we all are that it doesn't.
 
2013-10-12 03:26:01 PM

AverageAmericanGuy: I'll just leave this here.


That article says nothing about the fraction of revenue going where.  There are lobbyists being paid by companies that do business with governments, big freakin shock.  In fact, at your link it says:

The fine for running a red light is $158 in Florida. For cash-strapped cities and towns, catching enough violators could yield millions of dollars a year.

Chicago expects $100M in revenue annually from these cameras.  So, I agree with the person who said cities wouldn't do this if there were no money in it for them.
 
2013-10-12 03:48:40 PM

AverageAmericanGuy: What I'm against is how the money collected by the cameras mostly goes to the camera companies and that the citizens of the cities/counties that implement these vote against the systems that they are still on the hook for paying these companies (that are usually out of state in the first place).

There is so little benefit for the cities and counties that use these systems.


I'd argue the fundamental issues is if these cameras actually alter behavior and thus, reduce traffic accidents.

Doing some googling, it doesn't look like there is a conclusive answer -- there are plenty of examples where accidents both declined and increased.

My gut feeling is that the best way to reduce accidents is making physical alterations to roads to better control traffic flow. Example: there was a bridge near my house that emptied into a residential neighborhood. The bridge was a straightaway that resulted in cars leaving the bridge and entering the neighborhood at speeds above the limit. When the bridge was re-decked a kink was added to the roadway on the bridge which forced cars to bank and lower their speed. That solved the problem. This might be an extreme example, but the point is that while the camera would have been a much cheaper way to deal with this problem, it doesn't necessarily work 100% of the time.

So while cameras are cheap and produce revenue, spending more money on road alterations is probably what's really needed to save lives.

A less extreme examples of this I've seen are redoing intersections and traffic signals, such as not allowing cars to turn while pedestrians have a green light, and only allowing turns when through traffic has a red light.
 
2013-10-12 03:57:51 PM

TheGogmagog: I'm surprised that's all they got. I drove through Chicago for the first time last weekend. Not one car went the speed limit on the express way. Then most was under construction with reduced speed limits which didn't even slow drivers to the standard speed limits. I realize that's not what TFA was covering but I can't imagine they all become model drivers because they are in a residential area.


I travel all over the country for work, and that's pretty much the situation on the highways going through every major city: LA, NYC, Atlanta, Philly, Houston, Dallas, all of Florida, etc. Atlanta might quite possibly be the craziest. I-85 takes a big bank as it goes through downtown; the speed limit is 55, but everybody is going at least 65.

The only place I've found that everyone goes the limit is the Southeast (minus Atlanta and Florida), but at the same time, more than any part of the country drivers down there drive in the left lane.
 
2013-10-12 04:06:27 PM

MFAWG: Saw a Pontiac Phoenix the other day.


We had one of those when I was a kid. What a piece of crap! (literally, it was sh*t brown)
 
2013-10-12 04:14:06 PM

fluffy2097: Fines for violations are $35 for vehicles travelling 6-10 miles per hour over the posted speed limit while in a safety zone, and $100 for vehicles travelling 11 or more miles over the posted speed limit.

[media.tumblr.com image 500x276]


That's how it starts.

Followed by annual increases for the next 6 years.
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2013-10-12 06:32:02 PM
Maybe it's just one guy who gets around a lot.
 
2013-10-12 07:19:47 PM

pirho451: TommyDeuce: pirho451: Citation, you say?
[carphotos.cardomain.com image 575x431]

Is that an engine from a Grand National shoe-horned into a Citation II?

/The line between genius and crazy is thin indeed

Similar. That one was out of a Park Avenue Ultra.  The same guy did a number of other swaps, including a Caddy 4.9 V8.   http://baron512.net/


Cool, reminds me of some friends who dropped a For 302 into an early 80's Datsun 240.  Needed sandbags in the back to have enough weight to get traction when they floored it.

/Thin line indeed
 
2013-10-12 07:35:32 PM

meyerkev: TheGogmagog: I'm surprised that's all they got. I drove through Chicago for the first time last weekend. Not one car went the speed limit on the express way. Then most was under construction with reduced speed limits which didn't even slow drivers to the standard speed limits. I realize that's not what TFA was covering but I can't imagine they all become model drivers because they are in a residential area.

Yeah.  They're even crazier than Michiganders.

Michiganders go 80-85 on a nice flat, swooping, well-designed (more or less.  There's some WTF's, but not at every single exit) section of usually rural freeway that's marked at 70.
Chicago(ans?  ers?) go 75 on a terrible urban freeway marked as 55 (or on one notable section of I-80, 45).

So I'm going 65 trying to balance "not getting killed" with "not getting a ticket because I have out-of-state plates".

/It'd be way safer if they'd just use the 85th percentile rule.




I said the exact same thing. I like to drive fast but those roads were horrible.
 
2013-10-12 07:43:47 PM

bingethinker: Speeding in a school zone? So, 30 m.p.h. in a 20 zone. Yep, you can do that in a Citation. 85 in a 55 zone? Not so likely.


You know how I know you have never been in a Citation?

Not super fast, but plenty fast to get yourself in trouble, and much faster than you think.
 
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