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(12 News Now)   Guess the state where it's legal to sell crack (as long as you're a cop)?   (12newsnow.com) divider line 50
    More: Florida, News KBMT, minimum sentence, profit motive, South Florida metropolitan area, sting operations, florida  
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5189 clicks; posted to Main » on 12 Oct 2013 at 10:23 AM (49 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-10-12 08:24:47 AM
If the stings are successful, informants can receive large payouts and police can seize cash, cars and other non-monetary assets.

WTF?
 
2013-10-12 08:25:50 AM

Lsherm: If the stings are successful, informants can receive large payouts and police can seize cash, cars and other non-monetary assets.

WTF?


Nevermind, had a brain fart.  No coffee yet.
 
2013-10-12 09:03:40 AM
Sounds like this sort of thing happens all the time and the cops got caught on their bullshiat this time.
 
Pud [TotalFark]
2013-10-12 10:11:43 AM
Entrapment enshmatsment .....Eventually, the female informant placed a kilo of cocaine in Borjas' bag to establish possession.

Who among us hasn't had a spare kilo of cocaine and thought, wouldn't it be funny just to plant it on that person and watch the fun? You know, for the LOLs
 
2013-10-12 10:28:31 AM
I only skimmed, but nowhere did in the article did I see that police actually handed somebody an eightball and receive payment for said product. Just stings and asset seizures, which--call me crazy--might also take place in jurisdictions across the entire country.
 
2013-10-12 10:29:04 AM
How exactly is this benefiting the residents of Sunrise, Florida?
 
2013-10-12 10:29:28 AM

Pud: Entrapment enshmatsment .....Eventually, the female informant placed a kilo of cocaine in Borjas' bag to establish possession.

Who among us hasn't had a spare kilo of cocaine and thought, wouldn't it be funny just to plant it on that person and watch the fun? You know, for the LOLs


A SPARE kilo? I WISH!  It seems like I'm always chronically short.  I use it for cooking every day, and I've found it also works great as a buffing compound for tough stains both inside and outside the house.
 
2013-10-12 10:31:32 AM

The One True TheDavid: How exactly is this benefiting the residents of Sunrise, Florida?


Their police services are funded by individuals flying in from out of state with large bags of cash.
 
2013-10-12 10:31:42 AM
 
2013-10-12 10:32:01 AM
New FL motto:"Crime Entrapment pays. Lunacy stays."
 
2013-10-12 10:32:09 AM
Mexico
 
2013-10-12 10:34:30 AM
t.qkme.me
 
2013-10-12 10:36:15 AM
Don't you fools see that drugs are bad?
 
2013-10-12 10:36:47 AM
To me, this looks just like the typical sting situation.  The only thing that's odd is that it's the buyers they're looking to bust instead of the sellers.  Doesn't seem to be that unusual.

If you're talking about law-enforcement-as-profit-center, here in Michigan we had an interesting case.  In Michigan, they can seize your car if you're convicted of solicitation of prostitution.  However, if you're not convicted, they have to return your car.  However, they're allowed to charge a fee for holding the vehicle.

There was a city here which went onto Craigs List, Backpage, and posted a bunch of hooker ads.  When the Johns showed up at the hotel, they were arrested and their car was seized.  The guys arrested all either eventually had charges reduced to something inane (some civil infraction and got off with a fine) or dropped altogether.  However, they had to pay a couple thousand dollars to get their cars back, even though they weren't convicted of the prostitution charge.  The local police chief was bragging about it on the news as a combination of revenue generation and ending the great plague of high end, Internet-based prostitution.
 
2013-10-12 10:40:37 AM
Just as every cop is a criminal
And all the sinners saints
 
2013-10-12 10:40:50 AM
"detectives play the role of cocaine dealers and try to lure in potential buyers who drive or fly in from all over the country with wads of cash. If the stings are successful, informants can receive large payouts and police can seize cash, cars and other non-monetary assets. The busts have pumped millions of dollars into local coffers."


4.bp.blogspot.com
 
2013-10-12 10:43:03 AM
That's called a reverse-buy sting. Very common narc tactic, used to shift drug dealing out of a neighborhood where they've gotten a lot of complaints. I sat in a cop van once (I was a newspaper reporter at the time) and watched them do it at this apartment complex that was basically a drive-through for crack. First they busted or chased out the dealers who were there (depending on whether they caught them holding). Then an undercover cop stood outside as if he were a dealer. When people drove up, he sold them actual crack that they had seized in other cases. Then, as they tried to drive off, several cop cars boxed them in and busted them for possession. Cops kept all the cars under asset forfeiture.

The result was that the crack dealers moved to a different location for awhile. Winning!

/The moral of the story is to know your crack dealer.
 
2013-10-12 10:45:04 AM
FTA:  Gus Borjas, a nurse by profession and a father of four from Homestead, Fla., got caught up in one of the Sunrise Police's cocaine stings. Lured by a paid informant he had known for years who promised to repay an old debt, Borjas agreed to bring a satchel filled with $23,000 in cash to a parking lot and, when he got there, he walked straight into a trap, Borjas said.

Because I know tons of nurses with 4 kids that have $23,000 in cash.  And why the fark would you need to bring that much cash to have someone else pay you money.  I can't think of any situation where a briefcase full of cash in a parking lot is for something not shady.  The cops may do lots wrong, but I have a feeling they busted the right person in this case.
 
2013-10-12 10:45:11 AM

mbillips: That's called a reverse-buy sting. Very common narc tactic, used to shift drug dealing out of a neighborhood where they've gotten a lot of complaints. I sat in a cop van once (I was a newspaper reporter at the time) and watched them do it at this apartment complex that was basically a drive-through for crack. First they busted or chased out the dealers who were there (depending on whether they caught them holding). Then an undercover cop stood outside as if he were a dealer. When people drove up, he sold them actual crack that they had seized in other cases. Then, as they tried to drive off, several cop cars boxed them in and busted them for possession. Cops kept all the cars under asset forfeiture.

The result was that the crack dealers moved to a different location for awhile. Winning!

/The moral of the story is to know your crack dealer.


I saw that episode of Cops, too.
 
2013-10-12 10:51:53 AM
Lured by a paid informant he had known for years who promised to repay an old debt, Borjas agreed to bring a satchel filled with $23,000 in cash to a parking lot and, when he got there, he walked straight into a trap, Borjas said.

if my own father said to me, "son, i need you to take this duffel bag full of cash to this deserted parking lot and hand it over to these guys you've never met," i would run away as fast as i could.  and i like my dad.  nobody in their right mind would walk into that situation and expect to walk out alive or not arrested.  i don't care how long they've been your friend, you are walking into a goddamn trap.
 
2013-10-12 10:53:53 AM
"Guess the state where it's legal to sell crack (as long as you're a cop)? "

The State of Unbalanced Power?
 
2013-10-12 10:54:04 AM

Kalashinator: I only skimmed, but nowhere did in the article did I see that police actually handed somebody an eightball and receive payment for said product. Just stings and asset seizures, which--call me crazy--might also take place in jurisdictions across the entire country.


The gist I got is once this Borja fella got to the meeting place, a second paid informant aggressively coaxed him into the meeting area, took his backpack, removed the money, and placed the drugs into the bag.  She then handed the bag back to him and he was popped for possession.

Granted, who carries 23,000 in cash with them in order to get more money owed to him?  That does indeed sound a bit fishy especially when the suspect is a nurse with 4 kids.
 
2013-10-12 10:58:45 AM

devildog123: FTA:  Gus Borjas, a nurse by profession and a father of four from Homestead, Fla., got caught up in one of the Sunrise Police's cocaine stings. Lured by a paid informant he had known for years who promised to repay an old debt, Borjas agreed to bring a satchel filled with $23,000 in cash to a parking lot and, when he got there, he walked straight into a trap, Borjas said.

Because I know tons of nurses with 4 kids that have $23,000 in cash.  And why the fark would you need to bring that much cash to have someone else pay you money.  I can't think of any situation where a briefcase full of cash in a parking lot is for something not shady.  The cops may do lots wrong, but I have a feeling they busted the right person in this case.


Yes, they got the right person, I think.

At any rate, I think the bigger issue for the local community is that cops are literally creating a drug market, and luring criminals INTO their community. I'd be upset if it was my local police doing this.

Of course, the idiot mayor has no issue with it - it is filling their coffers with cash, eliminating the city budget as a problem. Lowering property values, increasing petty crime, and probably increasing burglary rates in town, along with the potential of a deal turning into a firefight can be ignored when you are suffering from severe short-sightedness.
 
2013-10-12 11:03:08 AM
Ryan said that since reporters have revealed informants' identities and undercover locations, the reserve stings have stopped been put on the back burner until the American public's ADD kicks in. Once the next season of  Duck Dynasty comes on, he said the Sunrise Police Department will go back to what it always did -- fighting crime in Sunrise making a shiatton of money leeching off of criminal entrepeneurs.


FTFA

Seriously, America, concentrate long enough for at least one round of convictions like you do one round of kickoffs on American Idol.
 
2013-10-12 11:04:35 AM
"The police are not actually finding these drug dealers on their own but they rely on paid and unpaid informants to tell them about people that might be looking for cocaine, and it became obvious to us that the reason they are doing this is because of the money,"

It's almost as if letting cops take your money without a warrant and then keep it for themselves isn't such a great idea after all.
 
2013-10-12 11:05:28 AM
Aaaaand this is why authorities will never declare an end to Teh Waor on Druhgs.
 
2013-10-12 11:19:00 AM
That article never mentioned crack.
 
2013-10-12 11:44:17 AM
ToddLB
That article never mentioned crack.


Good point, but a large purchase of cocaine and crack are pretty much the same.

Spend 10 or 20 K on coke, boil it with baking soda, no dangerous or hard to find chemical like the production of meth. Just be careful not to spend the rest of your lifetime in prison when an ex-friend or neighbor turns on you because of jealously or profit.

But if someone can get away with this, they are set for a while.
 
2013-10-12 11:53:50 AM
"As soon as I got arrested, as soon as they-- Just, everything clicked in my head," he said. "'Why this? Why that?' They set me up."
s7.postimg.org
 
2013-10-12 12:15:41 PM
If you think a police officer is anything other than a gang member with diplomatic immunity, you haven't been paying attention.
 
2013-10-12 12:49:39 PM
jonathanokanlawon.com
 
2013-10-12 01:05:07 PM

The One True TheDavid: How exactly is this benefiting the residents of Sunrise, Florida?


The cops will simply hire more officers,
Because according to cop math that comes along at budget time, they can never have enough officers.
 
2013-10-12 01:22:20 PM
And some people still wonder why they get called "pigs"...
 
2013-10-12 01:47:15 PM

Silly_Sot: And some people still wonder why they get called "pigs"...


Because they arrest people that break the law? Isn't that what they're supposed to do?
 
2013-10-12 02:10:21 PM

CruiserTwelve: Silly_Sot: And some people still wonder why they get called "pigs"...

Because they arrest people that break the law? Isn't that what they're supposed to do?


No, because they set people up:

"In order for them to keep the money they have to make ... it look like I'm buying the drugs, obviously, you know," Borjas said.

Eventually, the female informant placed a kilo of cocaine in Borjas' bag to establish possession.

Suddenly, Borjas was now a drug offender and facing a possible mandatory 15-year minimum sentence for narcotics trafficking.
 
2013-10-12 02:24:07 PM

fredklein: CruiserTwelve: Silly_Sot: And some people still wonder why they get called "pigs"...

Because they arrest people that break the law? Isn't that what they're supposed to do?

No, because they set people up:

"In order for them to keep the money they have to make ... it look like I'm buying the drugs, obviously, you know," Borjas said.

Eventually, the female informant placed a kilo of cocaine in Borjas' bag to establish possession.

Suddenly, Borjas was now a drug offender and facing a possible mandatory 15-year minimum sentence for narcotics trafficking.


Yeah, Borjas is the nurse with 4 kids who brought $23,000 in cash to a parking lot, so someone could pay him back.  I'm sure things went EXACTLY the way he claimed they did.
 
2013-10-12 02:28:06 PM
CruiserTwelve
Silly_Sot: And some people still wonder why they get called "pigs"...
Because they arrest people that break the law? Isn't that what they're supposed to do?


Somewhere police stopped keeping bad people away from good people, and turned on 'civilians'. See the 81st, Adrian Schoolcraft. Instead of focusing on actual crimes, they started on non-quotas, juking compustat and using variations of the broken windows theory to get to zero tolerance. Management started focusing on revenue, looking for drunk college student and squeaking every last cent from DWI's. Rapes get reclassified as other crimes, while they look for bottom of the barrel criminals using questionable tools like baitcar to generate stats.

Your reponse is why people think you are too supportive of police, to say it politely.
 
2013-10-12 02:32:25 PM

devildog123: fredklein: CruiserTwelve: Silly_Sot: And some people still wonder why they get called "pigs"...

Because they arrest people that break the law? Isn't that what they're supposed to do?

No, because they set people up:

"In order for them to keep the money they have to make ... it look like I'm buying the drugs, obviously, you know," Borjas said.

Eventually, the female informant placed a kilo of cocaine in Borjas' bag to establish possession.

Suddenly, Borjas was now a drug offender and facing a possible mandatory 15-year minimum sentence for narcotics trafficking.

Yeah, Borjas is the nurse with 4 kids who brought $23,000 in cash to a parking lot, so someone could pay him back.  I'm sure things went EXACTLY the way he claimed they did.


Oh, I'm sorry. i neglected to quote the preceding paragraph:

Undercover video from the case shows a second paid informant aggressively drawing him into the action.


It's not just his word- it's the COPS OWN VIDEO.
 
2013-10-12 03:05:37 PM
I find it hard to believe that the guy who flew into town carrying $23,000 in cash to meet a drug dealer in a parking lot is an innocent party here.

The cops may well be crossing the line, and I'm certainly no fan of civil forfeiture laws being used as an excuse for cops to just take anything they want without so much as a trial.

But the guy in this article is no angel, and doesn't make for a very good poster boy.
 
2013-10-12 03:37:49 PM

fredklein: devildog123: fredklein: CruiserTwelve: Silly_Sot: And some people still wonder why they get called "pigs"...

Because they arrest people that break the law? Isn't that what they're supposed to do?

No, because they set people up:

"In order for them to keep the money they have to make ... it look like I'm buying the drugs, obviously, you know," Borjas said.

Eventually, the female informant placed a kilo of cocaine in Borjas' bag to establish possession.

Suddenly, Borjas was now a drug offender and facing a possible mandatory 15-year minimum sentence for narcotics trafficking.

Yeah, Borjas is the nurse with 4 kids who brought $23,000 in cash to a parking lot, so someone could pay him back.  I'm sure things went EXACTLY the way he claimed they did.

Oh, I'm sorry. i neglected to quote the preceding paragraph:

Undercover video from the case shows a second paid informant aggressively drawing him into the action.

It's not just his word- it's the COPS OWN VIDEO.


Th-th-th-that's all folks!
 
2013-10-12 03:38:27 PM
This is pathetic.  If they allow this to go on for more than a 1-3 month period, it will obviously cause greed influenced corruption within the department..  If their informants are making 800k within a 5 year period, I will only assume that the police are making far more than this.  If they aren't filling their pockets with blow, and cutting the product all to shiat, I would be VERY surprised.  It's probably the reason the blow around here is garbage.
I remember in the early 2000's when a customer could get some good quality fish scale for $1100/oz in PA if you knew the right people.  I was in NY a couple weeks ago and all I saw was garbage.  I guess this is why I have only done 1 line in the past 5 or so years.
 
2013-10-12 05:02:56 PM
Actually, since this "anti-drug program" is fully funding itself I don't see a huge problem with it.

Other than the uh... ENTRAPMENT!!!!
 
2013-10-12 06:09:39 PM
I am making a prediction....
Cruiser Twelve will come back hours later when everyone is gone and the thread is dead and then respond.
 
2013-10-12 10:20:34 PM

Enemabag Jones: Your reponse is why people think you are too supportive of police, to say it politely.


I'm as willing as anyone to condemn bad police behavior, but just what do you think that guy was doing carrying $23K in cash to a parking lot to meet with people he didn't even know?

By the way, the article says "Ultimately, Borjas got his $23,000 back and the prosecutor gave him a plea deal on a solicitation to purchase cocaine charge, because the female informant may have gone too far."
 
2013-10-13 10:16:01 AM

Enemabag Jones: I am making a prediction....
Cruiser Twelve will come back hours later when everyone is gone and the thread is dead and then respond.


You are the master.
 
2013-10-13 12:51:49 PM

CruiserTwelve: Enemabag Jones: Your reponse is why people think you are too supportive of police, to say it politely.

I'm as willing as anyone to condemn bad police behavior, but just what do you think that guy was doing carrying $23K in cash to a parking lot to meet with people he didn't even know?


I think that by doing that, he wasn't breaking any laws. And as long as he isn't breaking any laws, there is no reason for you, me, or the cops to think/look/investigate any further.

By the way, the article says "Ultimately, Borjas got his $23,000 back

After spending that much or more on lawyers, no doubt.

and the prosecutor gave him a plea deal on a solicitation to purchase cocaine charge, because the female informant may have gone too far."

"May"??? She outright planted the drugs on him!
 
2013-10-13 02:49:29 PM

fredklein: I think that by doing that, he wasn't breaking any laws. And as long as he isn't breaking any laws, there is no reason for you, me, or the cops to think/look/investigate any further.


This was obviously a targeted sting operation. They didn't just pick some random guy and ask him to take $23K to a parking lot. I'm sure the guy knew exactly why he was taking the money and what he was going to buy with it, and it was on tape.
 
2013-10-13 02:51:34 PM

Enemabag Jones: I am making a prediction....
Cruiser Twelve will come back hours later when everyone is gone and the thread is dead and then respond.


Sorry. I work a full time job and don't have time to monitor FARK and immediately respond to others responses to my posts. I respond when I can.
 
2013-10-13 03:03:28 PM

CruiserTwelve: fredklein: I think that by doing that, he wasn't breaking any laws. And as long as he isn't breaking any laws, there is no reason for you, me, or the cops to think/look/investigate any further.

This was obviously a targeted sting operation. They didn't just pick some random guy and ask him to take $23K to a parking lot. I'm sure the guy knew exactly why he was taking the money and what he was going to buy with it, and it was on tape.


Well, okay then. As long as you're sure.

Remind me why we have laws again, when all we need is the word of a cop that he's "sure"??
 
2013-10-13 04:26:12 PM
CruiserTwelve,
Everyone hates dirty cops, you do too and I will give you this. My issue with you is that you must know that policework has degraded. It has become lazy, based on revenue collection, and too often lawful evil. I am not sure if you even care. You can't see the difference between what is ethical and what lawful.

I am happy that you are here speading what you believe to be the good news, but if you want love you probably need to hit a firewalled cop forum.

CruiserTwelve,
This was obviously a targeted sting operation. They didn't just pick some random guy and ask him to take $23K to a parking lot. I'm sure the guy knew exactly why he was taking the money and what he was going to buy with it, and it was on tape.


Per the article:
Eventually, the female informant placed a kilo of cocaine in Borjas' bag to establish possession.

Between you and I, the article really does not help, but if the informant is willing to put cocaine in the mark's bag to get the desired results, the sting is really questionable. It is possible that the informant attempted to get the mark into the deal with open eyes, but we really don't know either way.

To use bait car tactics as an example, instead of leaving the car running unlocked in a bad neighborhood, they should leave a original and clean, locked 1994 integra out in front of a hopping nightclub. The detectives are getting lazy and depending on informants too much.

CruiserTwelve
Sorry. I work a full time job and don't have time to monitor FARK and immediately respond to others responses to my posts. I respond when I can.


So it is an accident that you lately always make comment and get out, disappear for hours and always come back when the thread is dead. Just working hours, got it.
 
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