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(Daily Mail)   'Fungus on my gastric band made my stomach explode' - Another compelling reason to consider using self control instead of surgery to lose weight   (dailymail.co.uk) divider line 130
    More: Scary, Gastric Bands Go Wrong, Samantha Haworth, Vitamin B12, medically induced coma, surgery  
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8603 clicks; posted to Main » on 11 Oct 2013 at 2:44 PM (40 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-10-11 08:02:27 PM

Contents Under Pressure: I had a relative die from obesity. Her ex and her son had their respective come to Jesus moments and stopped drinking beer and eating crap food. They both lost weight. A number of us have discussed it and several of us started watching our weight (meaning if it creeps up by 5-20 pounds, something gets done about it).  Her brother was obese for years and dropped beer/scotch and snacks after throwing out his back due to his big gut.

However, when obese people I know socially complain about their weight, I'm not allowed to talk, because with a BMI of 22, I apparently don't know anything about weight control.

I suspect I will be burying a good  number of my peers, even the ones younger than me.


Well. all that digging should keep you in shape, right?
 
2013-10-11 08:05:03 PM
I'm struggling with trying to eat healthier. I managed to drop a lot of weight years back but it was done mostly on a *starvation diet and I've gained a bunch back since then. *I did manage to cut out all soda and fast food for those couple years but I fell off the wagon. Trying to do it the right way this time around by weaning myself off crap food and eating healthier.

Trying not to snack late at night and watch my portion sizes. Also, pushing the plate away when I'm full even if there's still food left. Another big thing has been sorting out my cravings or eating for comfort as opposed to actual hunger. I found I was nibbling on stuff all the time for one reason or another. Now I try to avoid snacks and just wait until mealtimes. I can't say I've been terribly successful but I drink a lot more water these days and I've started introducing healthier foods to my diet. It's a start I guess.

Gastric bypass won't ever be an option. Do not want. I don't want the diabeetus or a heart attack either so.....
 
2013-10-11 08:13:54 PM

Piizzadude: ShawnDoc: First, I admit I don't have a large sample size to draw from, and this is just anecdote.  But every person I know who has gotten some form of gastric bypass/belly band, got ridiculously skinny at first, but ended up overweight again after 5 years or so.

Thats on them. You can "eat through" the surgery. I am going on 10 years now and still have all the weight off.

Sometimes exercise and will power are not an option. It happens and get off your high horses.


I had my surgery in July 2008; I have kept my weight off since going onto maintenance-the stage you enter once the weight loss phase is done. This is where you learn to maintain a healthy weight.

The surgery is a tool to use, not a cure. If the person continues to eat incorrectly and not exercise, then it will not work.  I, too, have seen people gain the weight back and more. However, that is a failure in the individual's ability to make the required life changes, not the surgery.
 
2013-10-11 08:50:31 PM
Not getting the surgery done by a quack helps too.

/Grew up skinny in a big fat family
//I'd be my ideal weight if I were four inches taller.
///I was fine until humans in general made me drink more
 
2013-10-11 08:51:30 PM
For everyone who has gotten the band or sleeve, is there a risk of losing too much weight? If you're 100 pounds overweight, what stops you from losing the 100 then 50 more until you're underweight? I would be afraid of getting too thin.
 
2013-10-11 09:02:38 PM

HillshirefarmsGOMEAT: For everyone who has gotten the band or sleeve, is there a risk of losing too much weight? If you're 100 pounds overweight, what stops you from losing the 100 then 50 more until you're underweight? I would be afraid of getting too thin.


It's a common question, actually. Your body weight drifts down until it finds a new set-point and then it just....stops. I really wanted to lose 100 pounds, I'm still 30 pounds overweight, but I'll take the 65 I've lost and kept off. I'm in a facebook group of a bunch of folks who had surgery the same week I did, and I'm in the lowest quartile for weight loss....but I'm also the oldest person. Average weight loss appeared to be predicated a bit on age too. 20 to 30 somethings lost a ton, 40 somethings slightly less, 50 somethings like me maybe 20% less.
 
2013-10-11 09:33:59 PM
So, wait, it's better to lose weight by eating less, than having surgery to force yourself from eating less? Go figure.

So, if you can lose weight with a gastric band, should you not also be able to lose weight without? Or is that just a crazy notion?

/I realize it's not always that simple
//I also realize much of the time it is
 
2013-10-11 09:37:18 PM

MechaPyx: I'm struggling with trying to eat healthier. I managed to drop a lot of weight years back but it was done mostly on a *starvation diet and I've gained a bunch back since then. *I did manage to cut out all soda and fast food for those couple years but I fell off the wagon. Trying to do it the right way this time around by weaning myself off crap food and eating healthier.

Trying not to snack late at night and watch my portion sizes. Also, pushing the plate away when I'm full even if there's still food left. Another big thing has been sorting out my cravings or eating for comfort as opposed to actual hunger. I found I was nibbling on stuff all the time for one reason or another. Now I try to avoid snacks and just wait until mealtimes. I can't say I've been terribly successful but I drink a lot more water these days and I've started introducing healthier foods to my diet. It's a start I guess.

Gastric bypass won't ever be an option. Do not want. I don't want the diabeetus or a heart attack either so.....


Good for you! The biggest thing I've seen/found is carbs and processed sugars. Replace your snacks with celery, jicama, carrots, apple slices, lots of good things to nibble that aren't bad for you. Water's wonderful, or tea if you want something with some flavor. I personally don't try to follow a "diet", those hard and fast rules just set you up for failure. Just keep a good mix of vegetables and meats on hand (just don't count potatoes as a veggie), reduce the number of (especially processed) carbs you eat and replace that eating with solid filling veggies like salad, broccoli, etc. It'll feel weird for a few weeks, but it's the best way to lose and keep a manageable weight, and if you learn to like a wide variety of veggies you don't even have to worry much about vitamins or anything any more. It's all in your food, the way it's supposed to be ;)

A lot of it just retraining your tongue on what tastes good. Veggies and such taste amazing after you've weaned yourself mostly off the sugars and high-carb foods. Good luck!
 
2013-10-11 10:58:55 PM
My problem is that I severely dislike pretty much all foods that have low enough nutritional value to be "healthy" foods.  Yes, that's what healthy foods are - foods that are filling but have low nutritional value.
 
2013-10-11 11:06:57 PM

Myria: My problem is that I severely dislike pretty much all foods that have low enough nutritional value to be "healthy" foods.  Yes, that's what healthy foods are - foods that are filling but have low nutritional value.


Who fed you this line of shiat?
 
2013-10-11 11:23:09 PM

Yogimus: Piizzadude: Sometimes exercise and will power are not an option. It happens and get off your high horses.

... the hell? How is willpower not an option?


Easy. It never factors in. You can control yourself, exercise and do all the right things and never drop an ounce. Being fat sometimes has nothing to do with diet, exercise or will power.

I am not talking about the idiot little snowflake people that think the world is against them, but it does happen.
 
2013-10-11 11:24:45 PM

Shakespeare's Sister: Piizzadude: ShawnDoc: First, I admit I don't have a large sample size to draw from, and this is just anecdote.  But every person I know who has gotten some form of gastric bypass/belly band, got ridiculously skinny at first, but ended up overweight again after 5 years or so.

Thats on them. You can "eat through" the surgery. I am going on 10 years now and still have all the weight off.

Sometimes exercise and will power are not an option. It happens and get off your high horses.

I had my surgery in July 2008; I have kept my weight off since going onto maintenance-the stage you enter once the weight loss phase is done. This is where you learn to maintain a healthy weight.

The surgery is a tool to use, not a cure. If the person continues to eat incorrectly and not exercise, then it will not work.  I, too, have seen people gain the weight back and more. However, that is a failure in the individual's ability to make the required life changes, not the surgery.


Marry me? this is exactly right.
 
2013-10-11 11:25:44 PM

headstone: Myria: My problem is that I severely dislike pretty much all foods that have low enough nutritional value to be "healthy" foods.  Yes, that's what healthy foods are - foods that are filling but have low nutritional value.

Who fed you this line of shiat?


It seems self-evident.  Unhealthy foods are unhealthy because they are so densely filled with nutrition - calories, fat, protein, vitamins, etc. - that you easily end up eating too much of them.
 
2013-10-11 11:40:20 PM

Myria: headstone: Myria: My problem is that I severely dislike pretty much all foods that have low enough nutritional value to be "healthy" foods.  Yes, that's what healthy foods are - foods that are filling but have low nutritional value.

Who fed you this line of shiat?

It seems self-evident.  Unhealthy foods are unhealthy because they are so densely filled with nutrition - calories, fat, protein, vitamins, etc. - that you easily end up eating too much of them.


ummm...wat? Unhealthy food are just that because they are too healthy?
 
2013-10-12 02:12:07 AM
All these people with today's diseases of character -- things like "depression" and "morbid obesity" -- in my day we knew that anything other than visible trauma was caused by a personal failing and we expected people to deal with their problems without assistance or complaint [and get back to work]. I don't care what "doctors" and "science" say -- I know that obesity only affects bad people with no respect and no self control. I blame their parents; they probably didn't get hit enough when they were children. In my day if you saw a fatty you beat them until they lost a few pounds [of blood] and their parents thanked you for it.

--

There are some things people can try for self-treatment, and some people can accomplish significant weight loss without assistance. But telling fat people to "just eat less" is like telling depressed people to "just snap out of it" or telling people with PTSD to "just relax" -- totally useless advice from someone who doesn't understand the problem.
 
2013-10-12 02:39:46 AM

Myria: headstone: Myria: My problem is that I severely dislike pretty much all foods that have low enough nutritional value to be "healthy" foods.  Yes, that's what healthy foods are - foods that are filling but have low nutritional value.

Who fed you this line of shiat?

It seems self-evident.  Unhealthy foods are unhealthy because they are so densely filled with nutrition - calories, fat, protein, vitamins, etc. - that you easily end up eating too much of them.


Calories are not equivalent to nutrition. You can eat plenty of calories and still starve... look up rabbit starvation:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rabbit_starvation Most high-calorie foods are lacking in essential vitamins unless they're explicitly fortified, and that's still not a good balance of vitamins in general.

It's a complete line of shiat, and if you use that as a basis for your diet you will starve or be malnourished. Other foods get you BETTER nutrition with fewer calories, and give you plenty of energy to work with. Our bodies evolved eating mostly plants and proteins, no major sources of highly concentrated sugars or carbohydrates, with more calories coming from fruits and vegetables than protein and fat (but not pure vegetarian). Speaking of self-evident, the closer you eat to that, the healthier and not-starved you'll be.
 
2013-10-12 03:23:32 AM
Actual recipient of a gastric bypass here. I ate "normally" through my entire childhood. I would, unfortunately, get McDonald's once a week, that's about it.  I loved salad (and still do!). I had friends in school who would eat pizza, candy, chips, and cake for practically every meal and they never gained a pound, while I brought a single sandwich, a piece of fruit, and a diet soda for lunch. Still gained weight. I did my absolute best in PE, in spite of the teacher who weighed more than I did insisting that I was being lazy. But y'know what? I still managed to get to 450 pounds by the age of 19. The gastric bypass saved my life, and now, at 24, I'm down nearly 200 pounds and feeling amazing. This surgery saved my life. And beforehand, I had months of counseling to make sure I wasn't overweight because of disordered eating. They put me on a liquid diet for three weeks before the surgery. They made absolutely sure that I could handle it. I could only have liquids and pureed food for more than a month after, and I still have trouble with steaks and other "tough" meats. I cannot eat sugary or fried foods because they make me horribly sick. I can only eat maybe a cup's worth of food at a time. These kinds of surgeries are not cure-alls. They are not the easy way out. It's still hard for me, even after four years. I had to change my entire lifestyle, but it's completely worth it because I'm not going to be dead by 40 now.
/csb etc
 
2013-10-12 03:29:22 AM

owlholder: Actual recipient of a gastric bypass here. I ate "normally" through my entire childhood. I would, unfortunately, get McDonald's once a week, that's about it.  I loved salad (and still do!). I had friends in school who would eat pizza, candy, chips, and cake for practically every meal and they never gained a pound, while I brought a single sandwich, a piece of fruit, and a diet soda for lunch. Still gained weight. I did my absolute best in PE, in spite of the teacher who weighed more than I did insisting that I was being lazy. But y'know what? I still managed to get to 450 pounds by the age of 19. The gastric bypass saved my life, and now, at 24, I'm down nearly 200 pounds and feeling amazing. This surgery saved my life. And beforehand, I had months of counseling to make sure I wasn't overweight because of disordered eating. They put me on a liquid diet for three weeks before the surgery. They made absolutely sure that I could handle it. I could only have liquids and pureed food for more than a month after, and I still have trouble with steaks and other "tough" meats. I cannot eat sugary or fried foods because they make me horribly sick. I can only eat maybe a cup's worth of food at a time. These kinds of surgeries are not cure-alls. They are not the easy way out. It's still hard for me, even after four years. I had to change my entire lifestyle, but it's completely worth it because I'm not going to be dead by 40 now.
/csb etc


Our stories are close
 
2013-10-12 06:42:50 AM

Egoy3k: Cagey B: While I'm not sure how seriously to take a Daily Fail article on the matter, it is generally true that not eating quite so much is a better option than someone cutting you open and tinkering with your guts.

Telling an obese person to stop eating is like telling someone who is depressed to cheer up.

They may be 100% to blame for their condition but now that they are in it they in almost all cases need help to get out of it. Would you rather your hospital bills or taxes help fund critical emergency care for them or would you rather that they get less expensive intervention by a medical professional?  This intervention very well might include a gastric band.


False equivalency is false. Plenty of obese people make a lifestyle change and get fit every year, myself included. Quit asking us to buy-off on the bullshiat you've used to rationalize your own choices.
 
2013-10-12 07:00:41 AM

Myria: headstone: Myria: My problem is that I severely dislike pretty much all foods that have low enough nutritional value to be "healthy" foods.  Yes, that's what healthy foods are - foods that are filling but have low nutritional value.

Who fed you this line of shiat?

It seems self-evident.  Unhealthy foods are unhealthy because they are so densely filled with nutrition - calories, fat, protein, vitamins, etc. - that you easily end up eating too much of them.


Calorie density and vitamin richness are quite often completely unrelated. Your "self evident" truth is not based in reality.
 
2013-10-12 08:12:30 AM

Pitabred: MechaPyx: I'm struggling with trying to eat healthier. I managed to drop a lot of weight years back but it was done mostly on a *starvation diet and I've gained a bunch back since then. *I did manage to cut out all soda and fast food for those couple years but I fell off the wagon. Trying to do it the right way this time around by weaning myself off crap food and eating healthier.

Trying not to snack late at night and watch my portion sizes. Also, pushing the plate away when I'm full even if there's still food left. Another big thing has been sorting out my cravings or eating for comfort as opposed to actual hunger. I found I was nibbling on stuff all the time for one reason or another. Now I try to avoid snacks and just wait until mealtimes. I can't say I've been terribly successful but I drink a lot more water these days and I've started introducing healthier foods to my diet. It's a start I guess.

Gastric bypass won't ever be an option. Do not want. I don't want the diabeetus or a heart attack either so.....

Good for you! The biggest thing I've seen/found is carbs and processed sugars. Replace your snacks with celery, jicama, carrots, apple slices, lots of good things to nibble that aren't bad for you. Water's wonderful, or tea if you want something with some flavor. I personally don't try to follow a "diet", those hard and fast rules just set you up for failure. Just keep a good mix of vegetables and meats on hand (just don't count potatoes as a veggie), reduce the number of (especially processed) carbs you eat and replace that eating with solid filling veggies like salad, broccoli, etc. It'll feel weird for a few weeks, but it's the best way to lose and keep a manageable weight, and if you learn to like a wide variety of veggies you don't even have to worry much about vitamins or anything any more. It's all in your food, the way it's supposed to be ;)

A lot of it just retraining your tongue on what tastes good. Veggies and such taste amazing after you've we ...


I like a wide range of foods so finding something to eat isn't a problem. If anything I like food a little too much although I'm getting picky as I get older. My tastes have changed. I can't scarf down fast food like I used to. I still like the stuff but I look for better quality joints these days. I seem to have lost my appetite for microwaved stuff too. I still like sweets but in much smaller doses. Love me some bread and pasta though. Thing is even in smaller, restricted doses all those empty calories add up. Sometimes I just don't feel like cooking though so I end up turning to fast food or processed stuff. It's convenient but I recognize it as a crutch I lean on.

I'm not much on rules so I don't follow a particular diet regimen either. Mostly it's just trying to identify my eating habits and make changes where necessary(craving control, portion sizes, etc) and strike a good balance. Currently my diet is too carb/sugar/processed food heavy so I'm slowly moving my focus towards more fruits and veggies and less of the other. I won't try to eliminate that stuff completely but I do need to eat less of it.
 
2013-10-12 08:13:46 AM
Was 305lbs this time last year, down to 232lbs this morning, aiming for 185-ish at 6' 1".

Eating less and exercising works.  It was getting commited to the daily change in lifestyle that was hard.  Trying to take an extra 60-90 minutes out of a busy day to exercise five or six days a week is hard.
 
2013-10-12 10:08:08 AM

nytmare: wee: But fat people can't help it.  It's genetics, hormones, low metabolism, and all sorts of things.  Eating better and moving around more often just aren't viable options for people who are overweight.  Being fat is in no way their fault, and surgery is the only option sometimes.

Eating better and moving around more is a total and complete cure-all for excess weight. Bone structure, genetics, packaged foods, HFCS, marketing, none of those things have anything to do with it. All you have to do is walk a

Seacop: Sudo_Make_Me_A_Sandwich: CaptainCliche: Oh good, a fatty hate thread! I can't wait for everyone to tell me that I should just eat less and exercise more! I totally never tried that!

Did you consistently eat 3-500 calories below your BMR (measured by a medical professional) for several weeks and fail to lose fat?


I watched my wife (after two kids) go to a nutritionist and join a health club with free access to an on staff trainer. During that time she portioned out everything, went to the gym every morning, walked every afternoon. She desperately wanted to lose weight. Lost nothing over a 6 week period, and no decrease in BF either.  She had lap band, saw the lap band nutritionist, kept going to the gym and incorporated Zumba.

Two years later she's lost 60lbs and is loving life so much better. She's evened out what shes eating, (watches but no longer measures) and just does Zumba 5 days a week. She's down to losing two - four  pounds every month, wants to lose 30 more lbs, but doesn't want it all at once.

Some people need help.

more and eat a little less and soon you'll be skinny and attractive. It's so easy, anyone can do it. In fact, this is why every single person in the first world is so healthy and right sized.


Thing is, when she was exercising, but not losing weight, she was still eating far too much. I mean, really a lap band does nothing that simply eating less would do. All it does is make them "full" sooner. The behavior induced by the band is available to the individual by simply gaining the willpower to stop eating even though they are hungry.

Now for many that's not as easy to do as it is for another to say it, but those saying that treating the eating disorder (re: the percieved hunger) and any associated food addiction is the way to go before going the surgical route are correct imo.

/glad your wife is healthier
 
2013-10-12 10:32:15 AM
True story: A friend of mine worked at one of these clinics that does gastric bands. One year one of the other nurses decided it would be a good morale booster to go look up some of the past patients & see how many were successful keeping the weight off.

So she started calling up past clients to gather success stories. She couldnt find one.

She eventually gave up... and also left the company to go do something that actually helps people.
 
2013-10-12 10:37:07 AM

KatjaMouse: safeinsane: I started losing weight once my son was born in 2004 and met my goal (100 pounds) in 2008. Gained some back but as long as I can run and cycle, I'm happy with it.

/hated being a fatty

Yeesh how short are you?


Not sure I follow this...but I'm 5' 10"...
 
2013-10-12 10:58:18 AM

Ant: sign_of_Zeta: I will say the fat shaming that occurs (even by many health professionals) usually just depresses fat people and makes them want to eat more

This.

Being fat is a mental issue. All fat people know that expending more calories than you take in will make you lose weight. Telling them shiat like that is like telling a depressed person to just snap out of it and think happy thoughts.


So true - the bands, bypasses and sleeves are for those who know what they need to do, but are admitting that they cannot because they don't have the willpower. I think the fark vitriol is because of those who rather admit they cannot, get surgery simply because they will not modify their behavior without some kind of physical compulsion.
 
2013-10-12 11:01:12 AM

Piizzadude: Yogimus: Piizzadude: Sometimes exercise and will power are not an option. It happens and get off your high horses.

... the hell? How is willpower not an option?

Easy. It never factors in. You can control yourself, exercise and do all the right things and never drop an ounce. Being fat sometimes has nothing to do with diet, exercise or will power.

I am not talking about the idiot little snowflake people that think the world is against them, but it does happen.


Please tell me what kind of amazing metabolism violates thermodynamics please so I can patent their biochemistry and start making power plants...
 
2013-10-12 11:52:04 AM

safeinsane: KatjaMouse: safeinsane: I started losing weight once my son was born in 2004 and met my goal (100 pounds) in 2008. Gained some back but as long as I can run and cycle, I'm happy with it.

/hated being a fatty

Yeesh how short are you?

Not sure I follow this...but I'm 5' 10"...


Your goal is to be 100lbs at 5'10"? I'm 5'6" and my "ideal weight" according to medical professionals and nutritionists is 135. 5'10" and 100 lbs would look like Skeletor.

Unless of course your "goal" was to lose 100 lbs.
 
2013-10-12 12:23:18 PM

Piizzadude: Shakespeare's Sister: Piizzadude: ShawnDoc: First, I admit I don't have a large sample size to draw from, and this is just anecdote.  But every person I know who has gotten some form of gastric bypass/belly band, got ridiculously skinny at first, but ended up overweight again after 5 years or so.

Thats on them. You can "eat through" the surgery. I am going on 10 years now and still have all the weight off.

Sometimes exercise and will power are not an option. It happens and get off your high horses.

I had my surgery in July 2008; I have kept my weight off since going onto maintenance-the stage you enter once the weight loss phase is done. This is where you learn to maintain a healthy weight.

The surgery is a tool to use, not a cure. If the person continues to eat incorrectly and not exercise, then it will not work.  I, too, have seen people gain the weight back and more. However, that is a failure in the individual's ability to make the required life changes, not the surgery.

Marry me? this is exactly right.


I would be pleased to, but my husband may not like the idea. Thank you for the kind request and the smile it brought to my face.
 
2013-10-12 12:59:34 PM
Start with the simple things, it helps to do the bigger things later on. At my peak I was 275... I graduated high school at 145. I came out of basic training at 225. I'm now back to that weight. The thing that helped me the most was switching from soda to homebrewed iced tea. Yeah, I still put sugar in it, but it's not HFCS, and I've been reducing the amount of sugar I've been putting in it. I've been eating less portion-wise, but not changing my diet. I enjoy my food, but don't overindulge in it anymore. I still have my snacks every now and then, but again, I don't overindulge... If I can do that, anyone can.
 
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