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(Washington Post)   Cyclone Phailin set to impact India with 160 mph winds, if it doesn't resign halfway through to take a job on Fox News   (washingtonpost.com) divider line 28
    More: Scary, Phailin, Jeff Masters, Bay of Bengal, sea surface temperature, .ms  
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3015 clicks; posted to Main » on 11 Oct 2013 at 2:54 PM (46 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

2013-10-11 04:27:32 PM
3 votes:
0z79 "The goal was to drop it from aircraft and disrupt incoming severe weather."

Dyn-o-gel? The short version is, even if it worked exactly as advertised, even if it was as safe as advertised, you couldn't put enough of it in front of a large storm to make a difference.
And trying to play wack-a-mole with smaller systems fails for the same reason: assuming you had enough goop to take down enough smaller systems to reduce the atmospheric energy of an area such that it couldn't develop a monster storm, requires a similar amount as it would take to stop the monster storm when/if it actually appeared. (The energy in the atmosphere doesn't just go away because you stopped a given storm from building)

It's the same basic problem with "nuke the storm" suggestions. People just don't appreciate the quantities of energy involved in these storms. You might as well say that you're going to throw pebbles at a semi trailer to bring it to a stop. It could work, in theory. Given enough energy to accumulate and then accelerate enough pebbles. But if you had enough political support to marshal sufficient resources, you'd have been better served by building better infrastructure in the first place, so that speeding semis didn't present such a problem.
2013-10-11 03:18:46 PM
3 votes:
Legitimate HOTY contender. Well done, subby!
2013-10-11 02:56:26 PM
3 votes:
That's an excellent headline for a terrible situation.
2013-10-11 01:10:40 PM
3 votes:
Very nice, subby.
2013-10-11 09:53:39 PM
2 votes:
So you can get a sense of the scale of the storm:

www.goes.noaa.gov
2013-10-11 05:47:02 PM
2 votes:
Yep.

Kolkata: The city is on tenterhooks as Cyclone Phailin, forming over the Bay of Bengal, threatens to dampen the rest of the five-day Durga Puja festival.
According to the meteorological department, the cyclone is expected to make landfall on the West Bengal-Odish coast around Saturday evening bringing in torrential rainfall with winds expected to reach speeds of 205km per hour.

GulfNews
2013-10-11 04:05:30 PM
2 votes:

0z79: I remember a documentary on storm systems that I watched, years ago, which mentioned a substance which loved water; a fairly small bag would turn a 55-gallon drum of water into a sort of chemical gelatin within seconds. The goal was to drop it from aircraft and disrupt incoming severe weather.

It had footage of several tons of the stuff being spread over a tropical storm which was threatening to become a hurricane; this powder <i>ate</i> an entire cloudbank, and even after most of it was absorbed by the upper layers, you could see the entire system thinning all the way down.

The near-hurricane had dispersed into an average-for-the-area typhoon by the time it made landfall, though there was a great deal of a strange, gelatinous substance coming down with all that rain. While it dissolved and became inert fairly quickly, it was said that pets which came into contact with it had minor neurological problems, such as tremors and unsteady gait for a few hours.

This was before the Internet was nearly as useful as it is now, so I couldn't find information on it at the time and now, I don't know where to start looking; I keep coming up short. :/

It does beg a very interesting question, though; IF this stuff works as advertised and IF it can break a hurricane down to a regular storm, which do you choose; the damage from a category 5 hurricane, or a mostly untried substance of unknown toxicity raining down, forcing people to remain indoors while they wait for it to evaporate?


Your story reminds me of this stuff, Dyn-O-Storm. But the story is from 2002. Silver Iodide has been used for cloud seeding for decades, but it only causes rain. The effects you describe more remind me of the polymer in the story.

http://discovermagazine.com/2002/sep/featrain#.UlhZChAb-50

"Skimming the surface of the formation, the pilot dumped the powder, which drifted into the mist below. Minutes later observers in radar stations saw the cloud evaporate and disappear. Far below, a misty gel rained down into the waves and dissolved. "
2013-10-11 03:38:44 PM
2 votes:
From the BBC coverage.

"Extensive damage" was expected to mud houses on the coast.

I assume 'extensive damage' means ' reduced to trace elements and distributed evenly into the atmosphere'.
2013-10-11 03:27:45 PM
2 votes:
I was in India when Katrina hit the US. The way their media portrayed it made me furious. They compared it to some minor flooding (and the subsequent evacuation) that Mumbai had about that time. I remember getting really angry with people and telling them to be thankful that a Katrina-like hurricane hadn't hit them.

It's going to be awful if it this makes land fall.

(And I'll refrain from making any I-Told-You-So phone calls.)
2013-10-12 01:36:23 AM
1 votes:

trappedspirit: Reverend J: So you can get a sense of the scale of the storm:

[www.goes.noaa.gov image 720x720]

I don't see the USA on that map so I can't get a read of the magnitude


I've heard this storm is equivalent to Katrina in size, but much, much, much faster.

www.globalwarmingart.com
2013-10-11 10:51:23 PM
1 votes:

Reverend J: So you can get a sense of the scale of the storm:

[www.goes.noaa.gov image 720x720]


Thats current? Oh dear, the 12th?  Ok this might not be funny in a day or two.  Winds dying down? No?

May be about to break some records with this one.
2013-10-11 06:42:22 PM
1 votes:

abhorrent1: whatshisname: abhorrent1: Fark that place. Hope it washes it clean.

I'm going to guess you probably couldn't locate India on a world map, right?

You'd be guessing wrong but thanks for playing. Now bring me my late.


How do you bring someone a concept?
2013-10-11 06:12:02 PM
1 votes:

abhorrent1: Fark that place. Hope it washes it clean.


cache2.allpostersimages.com
2013-10-11 05:01:44 PM
1 votes:
That thing looks huge. Good news is that it isn't heading for Bangladesh or Calcutta. Bad news is, where it hits, there will still be lots of people. There is no way that it would possible to get people evacuated.

There is going to be a monster death toll.

/Glad my friends in Chennai are going to be safe.
2013-10-11 04:41:36 PM
1 votes:

fusillade762: crab66: All jokes aside. This will probably be really bad.

One of the most densely populated coastlines in the world that is very vulnerable to storm surge and has relatively poor infrastructure.

But when the area gets wiped out you can relocate all the people and build some shiny resort hotels!


3.bp.blogspot.com
Just a little readjustment.
2013-10-11 04:28:21 PM
1 votes:

durbnpoisn: 0z79: I remember a documentary on storm systems that I watched, years ago, which mentioned a substance which loved water; a fairly small bag would turn a 55-gallon drum of water into a sort of chemical gelatin within seconds. The goal was to drop it from aircraft and disrupt incoming severe weather.

It had footage of several tons of the stuff being spread over a tropical storm which was threatening to become a hurricane; this powder <i>ate</i> an entire cloudbank, and even after most of it was absorbed by the upper layers, you could see the entire system thinning all the way down.

The near-hurricane had dispersed into an average-for-the-area typhoon by the time it made landfall, though there was a great deal of a strange, gelatinous substance coming down with all that rain. While it dissolved and became inert fairly quickly, it was said that pets which came into contact with it had minor neurological problems, such as tremors and unsteady gait for a few hours.

This was before the Internet was nearly as useful as it is now, so I couldn't find information on it at the time and now, I don't know where to start looking; I keep coming up short. :/

It does beg a very interesting question, though; IF this stuff works as advertised and IF it can break a hurricane down to a regular storm, which do you choose; the damage from a category 5 hurricane, or a mostly untried substance of unknown toxicity raining down, forcing people to remain indoors while they wait for it to evaporate?


Never heard of that before.  It kinda reminds me of the old idea of tugging a huge ice berg into the path of the storm.

Here's the thing...  What you're proposing there sounds quite impossible.  There are many factors over an incredibly broad area from the surface to way up in the atmosphere that affect how a storm forms and acts.  Water is only one component.  Try to absorb that water with some sort of chemical sponge would actually ADD to the swirling mass.  Considering that the ...


That makes sense; shoot.

It's still a pretty interesting hypothetical question, though: If it were possible to disperse a severe storm yet still left tons and tons of sludge to clean up, would it be worth it?

Oh, and thanks to the people who responded with "Dyno-Gel" and "Dyno-Storm" links!

/navel gazing
2013-10-11 04:11:21 PM
1 votes:

0z79: I remember a documentary on storm systems that I watched, years ago, which mentioned a substance which loved water; a fairly small bag would turn a 55-gallon drum of water into a sort of chemical gelatin within seconds. The goal was to drop it from aircraft and disrupt incoming severe weather.

It had footage of several tons of the stuff being spread over a tropical storm which was threatening to become a hurricane; this powder <i>ate</i> an entire cloudbank, and even after most of it was absorbed by the upper layers, you could see the entire system thinning all the way down.

The near-hurricane had dispersed into an average-for-the-area typhoon by the time it made landfall, though there was a great deal of a strange, gelatinous substance coming down with all that rain. While it dissolved and became inert fairly quickly, it was said that pets which came into contact with it had minor neurological problems, such as tremors and unsteady gait for a few hours.

This was before the Internet was nearly as useful as it is now, so I couldn't find information on it at the time and now, I don't know where to start looking; I keep coming up short. :/

It does beg a very interesting question, though; IF this stuff works as advertised and IF it can break a hurricane down to a regular storm, which do you choose; the damage from a category 5 hurricane, or a mostly untried substance of unknown toxicity raining down, forcing people to remain indoors while they wait for it to evaporate?



Never heard of that before.  It kinda reminds me of the old idea of tugging a huge ice berg into the path of the storm.

Here's the thing...  What you're proposing there sounds quite impossible.  There are many factors over an incredibly broad area from the surface to way up in the atmosphere that affect how a storm forms and acts.  Water is only one component.  Try to absorb that water with some sort of chemical sponge would actually ADD to the swirling mass.  Considering that the storm is constantly gathering more water from the ocean as it goes, I can't see how it would make much difference.  And, wow, what a mess that would make.
2013-10-11 04:09:01 PM
1 votes:

crab66: All jokes aside. This will probably be really bad.

One of the most densely populated coastlines in the world that is very vulnerable to storm surge and has relatively poor infrastructure.


Understatement fo the year. Even normal storms can cause devastating floods in Bangladesh because of how low lying it is....At Cat 5 storm going stright up the Bay of Bengal? six digit death tolls would not be out of the question...God almighty, this could get really bad...
2013-10-11 04:03:09 PM
1 votes:

0z79: I remember a documentary on storm systems that I watched, years ago, which mentioned a substance which loved water; a fairly small bag would turn a 55-gallon drum of water into a sort of chemical gelatin within seconds. The goal was to drop it from aircraft and disrupt incoming severe weather.

It had footage of several tons of the stuff being spread over a tropical storm which was threatening to become a hurricane; this powder <i>ate</i> an entire cloudbank, and even after most of it was absorbed by the upper layers, you could see the entire system thinning all the way down.

The near-hurricane had dispersed into an average-for-the-area typhoon by the time it made landfall, though there was a great deal of a strange, gelatinous substance coming down with all that rain. While it dissolved and became inert fairly quickly, it was said that pets which came into contact with it had minor neurological problems, such as tremors and unsteady gait for a few hours.

This was before the Internet was nearly as useful as it is now, so I couldn't find information on it at the time and now, I don't know where to start looking; I keep coming up short. :/

It does beg a very interesting question, though; IF this stuff works as advertised and IF it can break a hurricane down to a regular storm, which do you choose; the damage from a category 5 hurricane, or a mostly untried substance of unknown toxicity raining down, forcing people to remain indoors while they wait for it to evaporate?


i think it is Dyn-o-Gel. A name that would also work in the dinosaur erotica thread.

http://www.anomalies-unlimited.com/Chemtrails/Dyn-O-Gel.html
2013-10-11 03:50:09 PM
1 votes:
"A worst case scenario would have Phailin tracking slightly eastward of its current forecasted track, toward Kolkata and the Ganges Delta of Bangladesh, which is home to tens of millions of people living just a few meters above sea level,"  .

Oops
2013-10-11 03:45:12 PM
1 votes:
Well. Guess Mother Earth is about to douche India and rinse it off a bit.
Wonder how much trash will be floating off shore for a while.
Hope at least some people can get out of the way.
2013-10-11 03:29:56 PM
1 votes:

Old_Chief_Scott: mbillips: I hope the infrastructure in that area has changed along with India's economy since 1999. Hard to evacuate when you're on foot or riding an oxcart.

I think they take the train now.

All of them.

At the same time.


therewillbeasia.files.wordpress.com

"Thank you, Phailin, for doing the needful."
2013-10-11 03:26:48 PM
1 votes:
wow, Katrina sized storm with 160 mph sustained winds.  I hope the Indians are fleeing the coast if they can.  This could get really ugly.
2013-10-11 03:26:39 PM
1 votes:
At last count, significant wave heights were estimated at 56 feet. Michael Bay must be having a coronary.
2013-10-11 03:17:58 PM
1 votes:
All jokes aside. This will probably be really bad.

One of the most densely populated coastlines in the world that is very vulnerable to storm surge and has relatively poor infrastructure.
2013-10-11 03:11:13 PM
1 votes:

illannoyin: Looks like cyclone Phailin has India in it's cross hairs.

I still think they could have gotten a woman who more closely resembled her to star in 'Nailin' Palin'.

Hopefully the cyclone won't mess up the country too much.

[robertlindsay.files.wordpress.com image 850x566]


uh... that's exactly the problem, dude... lack of good structures x human lives x this cyclone. this is going to be a mess for the global, interconnected- economy. this is not going to be good.
2013-10-11 03:05:48 PM
1 votes:

mbillips: I hope the infrastructure in that area has changed along with India's economy since 1999. Hard to evacuate when you're on foot or riding an oxcart.


I think they take the train now.

All of them.

At the same time.
2013-10-11 03:00:42 PM
1 votes:
Holy Cow!!!
 
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