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(Yahoo)   Man receives Bengals / Jets tickets as a gift, immediately bursts into tears. Wouldn't we all? (with dusty video)   ( sports.yahoo.com) divider line
    More: Sappy, Bengals, Jets, World Cup qualifiers, England manager, YShutdownCorner, Aldon Smith, Roy Hodgson, Kansas Speedway  
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675 clicks; posted to Sports » on 10 Oct 2013 at 12:08 PM (4 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



28 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2013-10-10 12:13:20 PM  
Isn't a story like this why we love the NFL?

I prefer actual football, personally.
 
2013-10-10 12:14:09 PM  
WHO-Dizzle!  I'd like to find out where this guy is sitting so I can go say Hi.
 
2013-10-10 12:44:03 PM  
FTFA: The best moment comes at about 4:20 into the video, when he tells his son he's never even held Bengals tickets before.

[stoned laughter] Heh heh heh heh heh he said 4:20 heh heh heh heh heh

/Beavis
 
2013-10-10 12:48:06 PM  
Could have been worse, like Steelers-Giants tickets.
 
2013-10-10 12:50:23 PM  
Did I just hear a father and son call each other 'Bro'?

Still, sweet deal.

Thank you, son.  You're welcome, father.
 
2013-10-10 01:26:03 PM  
As a Bengals fan, I want that son to be my son!
 
2013-10-10 01:33:47 PM  

Brakefornobody: Could have been worse, like Steelers-Giants tickets.


Tell me about it, at least the Jaguars give you free beer
 
2013-10-10 01:34:36 PM  
I love the NFL but I don't get people who get emotional about pro teams.  You literally are rooting for a shirt
 
2013-10-10 01:39:10 PM  
a signed dalton jersey?  Thanks I guess.. You know there are good players on the bengals right? Like AJ Green or any of the medical staff...


I keed I keed.

Cool story.  I hope he has fun.
 
2013-10-10 01:47:20 PM  
I'm sure they burst into tears because the father tells the son he bet the over on the game.
 
2013-10-10 01:49:24 PM  

Hang On Voltaire: I love the NFL but I don't get people who get emotional about pro teams.  You literally are rooting for a shirt


How is that different from any sport, pro or not, anywhere? I don't get emotional about whether Nintendo is successful or my favorite singer wins on some reality show, but I get why others might if that is their passion.

Humans get attached to things and they want those things to demonstrate value over the alternatives to justify that attachment. If you've rooted for a team to win for decades (for whatever reason) and you finally get to go experience that stadium experience and those fans and that team in person with your son, why wouldn't you get emotional? Chances are there are humans on that team you're rooting for beyond "literally rooting for a shirt".

Plus, that's the shirt that  I wear, dammit, and it better represent.

/took my dad to his first Bears game for his birthday last year
//had a blast literally rooting for those shirts together
 
2013-10-10 01:55:34 PM  

Hang On Voltaire: I love the NFL but I don't get people who get emotional about pro teams.  You literally are rooting for a shirt


I love the NFL but I don't get people who get emotional about gambling on sports.  You literally are hoping your knees don't get broken because you picked the wrong color shirts to win.
 
2013-10-10 01:57:02 PM  

Electromax: Hang On Voltaire: I love the NFL but I don't get people who get emotional about pro teams.  You literally are rooting for a shirt

How is that different from any sport, pro or not, anywhere? I don't get emotional about whether Nintendo is successful or my favorite singer wins on some reality show, but I get why others might if that is their passion.

Humans get attached to things and they want those things to demonstrate value over the alternatives to justify that attachment. If you've rooted for a team to win for decades (for whatever reason) and you finally get to go experience that stadium experience and those fans and that team in person with your son, why wouldn't you get emotional? Chances are there are humans on that team you're rooting for beyond "literally rooting for a shirt".

Plus, that's the shirt that  I wear, dammit, and it better represent.

/took my dad to his first Bears game for his birthday last year
//had a blast literally rooting for those shirts together


Because the Packers cheer Brett Farve one day and boo him when he goes to Minnesota and vice versa for Vikings fans.  Like I said, you are cheering for the jersey (Carlin did a bit on this).  In college football you are cheering for athletes that choose to go to the school that you went to.
 
2013-10-10 02:00:23 PM  
Cincinnati just beat the Patriots, and the Jets are not sucking this season. Not the greatest of matchups but not the worst. Geno Smith may be a good QB yet.
 
2013-10-10 02:07:08 PM  

Hang On Voltaire: Electromax: Hang On Voltaire: I love the NFL but I don't get people who get emotional about pro teams.  You literally are rooting for a shirt

How is that different from any sport, pro or not, anywhere? I don't get emotional about whether Nintendo is successful or my favorite singer wins on some reality show, but I get why others might if that is their passion.

Humans get attached to things and they want those things to demonstrate value over the alternatives to justify that attachment. If you've rooted for a team to win for decades (for whatever reason) and you finally get to go experience that stadium experience and those fans and that team in person with your son, why wouldn't you get emotional? Chances are there are humans on that team you're rooting for beyond "literally rooting for a shirt".

Plus, that's the shirt that  I wear, dammit, and it better represent.

/took my dad to his first Bears game for his birthday last year
//had a blast literally rooting for those shirts together

Because the Packers cheer Brett Farve one day and boo him when he goes to Minnesota and vice versa for Vikings fans.  Like I said, you are cheering for the jersey (Carlin did a bit on this).  In college football you are cheering for athletes that choose to go to the school that you went to.


Eh, different strokes but I doubt 100% of packer fans did that. Maybe most did, but not all.

I don't really see a difference between "athletes that choose the school you went to" and "athletes that play for the pro team you support" but I guess cheering for the jersey isn't really that hard to grasp for some people. If you live in that city it (in theory) represents your city/geography and gives you something to root for, akin to the college you went to or in the Olympics your home country.

I don't think your viewpoint is uncommon and I definitely get it, just thought I'd offer my thoughts on why people get emotional about sports because you said you couldn't understand it. People get emotional about weird stuff, but cheering for a jersey isn't necessarily a negative. Cynical folks see it as representing a commercial juggernaut lining the pockets of Goodell et al, but there are others who think back to the coaches and players that inspired them and the memories of who they were with and the emotions they had watching that team in the past.
 
2013-10-10 02:27:02 PM  

Hang On Voltaire: I love the NFL but I don't get people who get emotional about pro teams.  You literally are rooting for a shirt


It would be the experience I would be enjoying I would think.

Especially if maybe I never had the money and time to take myself out of state to an event I have only enjoyed from afar.
 
2013-10-10 02:31:35 PM  
Jim from Saint Paul:

It would be the experience I would be enjoying I would think.

Especially if maybe I never had the money and time to take myself out of state to an event I have only enjoyed from afar.


Yeah, OK, that I could see
 
2013-10-10 02:33:50 PM  

Hang On Voltaire: Electromax: Hang On Voltaire: I love the NFL but I don't get people who get emotional about pro teams.  You literally are rooting for a shirt

How is that different from any sport, pro or not, anywhere? I don't get emotional about whether Nintendo is successful or my favorite singer wins on some reality show, but I get why others might if that is their passion.

Humans get attached to things and they want those things to demonstrate value over the alternatives to justify that attachment. If you've rooted for a team to win for decades (for whatever reason) and you finally get to go experience that stadium experience and those fans and that team in person with your son, why wouldn't you get emotional? Chances are there are humans on that team you're rooting for beyond "literally rooting for a shirt".

Plus, that's the shirt that  I wear, dammit, and it better represent.

/took my dad to his first Bears game for his birthday last year
//had a blast literally rooting for those shirts together

Because the Packers cheer Brett Farve one day and boo him when he goes to Minnesota and vice versa for Vikings fans.  Like I said, you are cheering for the jersey (Carlin did a bit on this).  In college football you are cheering for athletes that choose to go to the school that you went to.


I know, right?  Nobody ever cheers for a college that they didn't attend.
 
2013-10-10 02:37:35 PM  

Brakefornobody: Could have been worse, like Steelers-Giants tickets.


woo hoo! with only 4 losses, the Steelers have a better record!!!!!1!!1
Miller and Bell are back!

/Steelers fan, was not optimistic this year.
 
2013-10-10 02:41:17 PM  

Electromax: Hang On Voltaire: Electromax: Hang On Voltaire: I love the NFL but I don't get people who get emotional about pro teams.  You literally are rooting for a shirt

How is that different from any sport, pro or not, anywhere? I don't get emotional about whether Nintendo is successful or my favorite singer wins on some reality show, but I get why others might if that is their passion.

Humans get attached to things and they want those things to demonstrate value over the alternatives to justify that attachment. If you've rooted for a team to win for decades (for whatever reason) and you finally get to go experience that stadium experience and those fans and that team in person with your son, why wouldn't you get emotional? Chances are there are humans on that team you're rooting for beyond "literally rooting for a shirt".

Plus, that's the shirt that  I wear, dammit, and it better represent.

/took my dad to his first Bears game for his birthday last year
//had a blast literally rooting for those shirts together

Because the Packers cheer Brett Farve one day and boo him when he goes to Minnesota and vice versa for Vikings fans.  Like I said, you are cheering for the jersey (Carlin did a bit on this).  In college football you are cheering for athletes that choose to go to the school that you went to.

Eh, different strokes but I doubt 100% of packer fans did that. Maybe most did, but not all.

I don't really see a difference between "athletes that choose the school you went to" and "athletes that play for the pro team you support" but I guess cheering for the jersey isn't really that hard to grasp for some people. If you live in that city it (in theory) represents your city/geography and gives you something to root for, akin to the college you went to or in the Olympics your home country.

I don't think your viewpoint is uncommon and I definitely get it, just thought I'd offer my thoughts on why people get emotional about sports because you said you couldn't understand it. ...


die-hard green and gold here

only truly bad fans booed brett after he left. some of them were friends and family and they were called out for that bad behavior and almost all would admit it was classless at this point

i grew up with #4 under center. he started his first game for the packers when I was 7 and his last game for the packers when i was 24. it was sad the way things ended and made a lot of people bitter and upset. i couldn't help but feel quite sad myself but i never understood the hate.

haters gotta hate
fans gotta fan

you sound like a hater and that makes me feel genuinely sorry for you

i.imgur.comView Full Size
 
2013-10-10 02:45:13 PM  

The Singing Bush: Hang On Voltaire: Electromax: Hang On Voltaire: I love the NFL but I don't get people who get emotional about pro teams.  You literally are rooting for a shirt

How is that different from any sport, pro or not, anywhere? I don't get emotional about whether Nintendo is successful or my favorite singer wins on some reality show, but I get why others might if that is their passion.

Humans get attached to things and they want those things to demonstrate value over the alternatives to justify that attachment. If you've rooted for a team to win for decades (for whatever reason) and you finally get to go experience that stadium experience and those fans and that team in person with your son, why wouldn't you get emotional? Chances are there are humans on that team you're rooting for beyond "literally rooting for a shirt".

Plus, that's the shirt that  I wear, dammit, and it better represent.

/took my dad to his first Bears game for his birthday last year
//had a blast literally rooting for those shirts together

Because the Packers cheer Brett Farve one day and boo him when he goes to Minnesota and vice versa for Vikings fans.  Like I said, you are cheering for the jersey (Carlin did a bit on this).  In college football you are cheering for athletes that choose to go to the school that you went to.

I know, right?  Nobody ever cheers for a college that they didn't attend.


i went to an awesome school that couldn't give two shiats about sports. as a sports fan, i continue to root for the teams i rooted for growing up

as i get older, it has admittedly gotten harder to feel the same passion for sports because the athletes are so much younger than I am now.

it's starting to effect my enjoyment of pro-sports as well as most of them are now younger than I am too. it feels too weird wearing a kids jersey who is younger than me so i don't

i hope i can still love sports when none of the athletes participating are older than I am but time will tell

/getting old is weird
//wouldn't go back for all the tea in mongolia
 
2013-10-10 03:01:29 PM  
blog.cleveland.comView Full Size
 
i2.cdn.turner.comView Full Size

How appropriate it is that this is over a game featuring two men who've greatly disappointed their fathers.
 
2013-10-10 03:14:31 PM  

EyeballKid: [blog.cleveland.com image 240x366] [i2.cdn.turner.com image 298x345]
How appropriate it is that this is over a game featuring two men who've greatly disappointed their fathers.


?? I know who they are. i am not getting the joke.
 
2013-10-10 04:08:39 PM  

Jim from Saint Paul: EyeballKid: [blog.cleveland.com image 240x366] [i2.cdn.turner.com image 298x345]
How appropriate it is that this is over a game featuring two men who've greatly disappointed their fathers.

?? I know who they are. i am not getting the joke.


You see, in the story featured, a son gives his father a pleasant surprise by getting him tickets to a game between the Cincinnati Bengals, owned by Mike Brown, who has a surprisingly bad mind for running for football; surprising, you see, because his father, Paul Brown, was quite good at this sort of thing; and the New York Jets, who are coached by Rex Ryan, who's the son of Buddy Ryan, a former NFL coach and defensive coordinator whose defenses looked good even without Darelle Revis on the team and Buffalo and Miami twice in the regular season.

So, you see, the boy surprised his father by exceeding his expectations of his son, and they will go see two men who surprisingly didn't meet the lofty goals of their respective fathers.


Somebody cue up "Cat's in the Cradle."
 
2013-10-10 04:51:57 PM  
 
2013-10-10 05:17:58 PM  

EyeballKid: You see, in the story featured, a son gives his father a pleasant surprise by getting him tickets to a game between the Cincinnati Bengals, owned by Mike Brown, who has a surprisingly bad mind for running for football; surprising, you see, because his father, Paul Brown, was quite good at this sort of thing; and the New York Jets, who are coached by Rex Ryan, who's the son of Buddy Ryan, a former NFL coach and defensive coordinator whose defenses looked good even without Darelle Revis on the team and Buffalo and Miami twice in the regular season.


As a head coach Buddy is 55-55 but is 0-3 in the playoffs, the two memories I have of him are being carried off the field by the Bears defense after their superb owl win and throwing a punch at kevin gilbride? as a defensive co-ord with the oilers.

Rex (36-32) has multiple AFC championship appearances, 4 and 2 in the playoffs, but again he is working for the jets expecting more than modest playoff success seems to be horribly miscalibrated expectations.

And before Mike Brown assumed ownership the bengals werent exactly world beaters (Outside of a Superbowl appearance I dont remember much out of them). Although from what I hear the Bengals and Bucs are both horribly mismanaged to the point jerr-uh seems like a genius.
 
2013-10-10 06:04:03 PM  

farbekrieg: As a head coach Buddy is 55-55 but is 0-3 in the playoffs, the two memories I have of him are being carried off the field by the Bears defense after their superb owl win and throwing a punch at kevin gilbride? as a defensive co-ord with the oilers.

Rex (36-32) has multiple AFC championship appearances, 4 and 2 in the playoffs, but again he is working for the jets expecting more than modest playoff success seems to be horribly miscalibrated expectations.


Haven't you heard? Fark Conventional Wisdom holds that the Jets have been a disaster for the last five years; currently they're 0-5 and ranked #33 in the power rankings. They haven't done anything notable except the buttfumble and cutting Danny Woodhead. The term "dumpster fire" is frequently used. Also, Rex likes feet.
 
2013-10-11 12:34:38 AM  

Hang On Voltaire: I love the NFL but I don't get people who get emotional about pro teams.  You literally are rooting for a shirt


Feels your bewilderment about emotional attachments

3.bp.blogspot.comView Full Size
 
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