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(Fox News)   Scientists make potential breakthrough in treating Alzheimer's Disease, will gladly share it with the world when they can remember where they put it   (foxnews.com) divider line 12
    More: Interesting, brain cells, Alzheimer's Disease, Science Translational Medicine, sewage treatment, neurodegenerative diseases, prion proteins, mice, neurology  
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943 clicks; posted to Geek » on 10 Oct 2013 at 10:24 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-10-10 10:33:35 AM  
I SAID, SCIENTISTS MAKE POTENTIAL BREAKTHROUGH ...
 
2013-10-10 10:42:39 AM  
"using a drug-like compound"

Or, in layman's terms, a drug.
=Smidge=
 
2013-10-10 10:47:01 AM  
I hope this pans out.  Alzheimer's is a cruel disease and it needs to leave this universe forever.
 
2013-10-10 10:52:24 AM  
Not to be too pedantic but Alzheimers has nothing to do with what most people call "senior moments" or doing things like forgetting where you put things.  The way it was described to me by my fathers doctor is that a senior moment is when you forget where you put your keys.  Alzheimers is when you forget what a keys are supposed to do.
 
2013-10-10 11:01:07 AM  
Kind of a nifty breakthrough - the drug they identified works downstream of prion aggregation to keep afflicted cells' translation machinery functioning. Which means this isn't really a cure for PrP but a treatment and one that only works in mice (so far). Unfortunately the literature it littered with drugs that work in animal models but do jackshiat for humans.
 
2013-10-10 11:05:31 AM  
Unfortunately, getting a drug to work in mice is only the first step. The next three steps are 1) Making sure the side effects in humans aren't too terrible, 2) Grab a handful of alzheimic volunteers and see if this helps them, and 3) Scale up Phase 2 to a whole bunch of alzheimic volunteers and see if this helps them.

The drug can fail at any of these stages (and they often do), even the third one, which is a shame, because at that point they've spent as much money developing it as they would have on a successful drug but they don't get any money back from it.

Very few drugs that make it past mouse trials become successful. We all hope they do, but the reality is that Big Pharma is only a few steps above gambling (which is a shame, because alzheimer's cures would be a really farking great thing to have).
 
2013-10-10 11:45:36 AM  
Pretty sure I saw this article earlier. Is this the one that just says (more or less) "Scientists gave some alzheimer-like mice some unnamed substance and it seemed to help." and nothing more?

Anybody got a link to an INFORMATIVE article on this particular research?

/Yeah, I could click the link and see if it's the same one, but if it is, it doesn't deserve another "click"...
 
2013-10-10 02:11:03 PM  
Treats Alzheimer's and causes weight loss? Bonus!
 
2013-10-10 02:19:43 PM  
Hmm, grandma has Alzheimer's so I'm interested in a clinical trial.

/dunno if she'll live long enough to get there though. She's late stage-6 at this point.

KCCO: Not to be too pedantic but Alzheimers has nothing to do with what most people call "senior moments" or doing things like forgetting where you put things.  The way it was described to me by my fathers doctor is that a senior moment is when you forget where you put your keys.  Alzheimers is when you forget what a keys are supposed to do.


Yup. Or, pouring an entire bowl of cereal, including the milk, but not being able to feed yourself because you can't remember if you're supposed to use the fork or the spoon, or how to hold the spoon.

/in our house, we call senior moments "old bonger's disease." Completely different from what my grandmother does.
 
2013-10-10 02:30:13 PM  
www.smbc-comics.com
www.smbc-comics.com
 
2013-10-10 02:44:32 PM  

Epicanis: Pretty sure I saw this article earlier. Is this the one that just says (more or less) "Scientists gave some alzheimer-like mice some unnamed substance and it seemed to help." and nothing more?

Anybody got a link to an INFORMATIVE article on this particular research?

/Yeah, I could click the link and see if it's the same one, but if it is, it doesn't deserve another "click"...


It's even more bullshiatty than that. They gave mice Creuzfeld-Jakob disease ("mad cow"). CJD is not Alzheimer's. It only shares a superficial mechanical similarity in that both CJD and AD include loss of brain tissue. So, they induce CJD in mice and then force-fed it a protein kinase inhibitor that specifically targets a tissue damage pathway that CJD has. Guess what--this pathway is not part of Alzheimer's. Here's the thing, though. Very few people get CJD, and it's fairly easy to prevent, since most cases come from eating animal products that can be removed from the foodstream. Thus, you don't get much money for figuring out how to give mice CJD and then slowing down its progress. Therefore, you hand-wave about how it might or might not somehow resemble or not resemble Alzheimer's disease and then let the worthless morons who were too stupid to actually understand science, so they became "science reporters" do the rest.
 
2013-10-10 05:12:06 PM  

Silly_Sot: Epicanis: Pretty sure I saw this article earlier. Is this the one that just says (more or less) "Scientists gave some alzheimer-like mice some unnamed substance and it seemed to help." and nothing more?

Anybody got a link to an INFORMATIVE article on this particular research?

/Yeah, I could click the link and see if it's the same one, but if it is, it doesn't deserve another "click"...

It's even more bullshiatty than that. They gave mice Creuzfeld-Jakob disease ("mad cow"). CJD is not Alzheimer's. It only shares a superficial mechanical similarity in that both CJD and AD include loss of brain tissue. So, they induce CJD in mice and then force-fed it a protein kinase inhibitor that specifically targets a tissue damage pathway that CJD has. Guess what--this pathway is not part of Alzheimer's. Here's the thing, though. Very few people get CJD, and it's fairly easy to prevent, since most cases come from eating animal products that can be removed from the foodstream. Thus, you don't get much money for figuring out how to give mice CJD and then slowing down its progress. Therefore, you hand-wave about how it might or might not somehow resemble or not resemble Alzheimer's disease and then let the worthless morons who were too stupid to actually understand science, so they became "science reporters" do the rest.


So, basically what they're saying is "Check it out, this protein kinase inhibitor inhibits protein kinase, at least in mice with 'Mad-Cow-like' disease we gave them. 'Mad-cow-like' disease kind of looks like Alzheimer's though, so praise us and give us another grant." Got it.

/Kind of like how so many papers want to make any connection they can to "also we might be able to use this research for cancer treatment in some obscure manner"
//Mmmmm...infectious amyloids
 
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