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(BBC)   Depression starts in the womb claim scientists, those who pay child support   (bbc.co.uk) divider line 24
    More: Sad, Institute of Psychiatry, Bristol University, JAMA Psychiatry  
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1659 clicks; posted to Main » on 10 Oct 2013 at 10:49 AM (49 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-10-10 10:52:03 AM
Read it again, subby.
 
2013-10-10 10:52:05 AM
The article talks about how treating the mother's depression while pregnant will lower the (possibly slightly increased) risk of depression in the child, but how does that compare to the risks to the fetus of antidepressants while pregnant?
 
2013-10-10 10:54:15 AM

Nina_Hartley's_Ass: Read it again, subby.


Never let facts get in the way of a humorous headline to tempt the admins.
 
2013-10-10 10:54:56 AM
vapetv.com
 
2013-10-10 10:55:42 AM
It's genetic.  Want proof?  Spend a day with me and then, while you're wondering how I never ended up in the nuthouse, go spend some time with my family.

Yeah.  It's genetic.
 
2013-10-10 10:59:12 AM
No. Depression starts when you realize you have to work for a living and will need to dedicate the majority of your time to work until you are dead.
 
2013-10-10 11:16:35 AM
Fetal depression is when you realize that all those people with signs don't give a shiat about a baby AFTER it's born.
 
2013-10-10 11:17:44 AM
I have been paying lots of money for Child Support for 8 years and my daughter turns 18 in 148 days - but who's counting....ME!!
 
2013-10-10 11:20:37 AM

WarszawaScream: It's genetic.  Want proof?  Spend a day with me and then, while you're wondering how I never ended up in the nuthouse, go spend some time with my family.

Yeah.  It's genetic.


Problematically, not everything that's congenital is genetic(and many that are aren't 100% genetic).  A lot of permanent characteristics are affected by the hormones the mother's womb produces.  Since brains are very sensitive to hormonal conditions, I see no reason why you should jump to that conclusion.
 
2013-10-10 11:20:49 AM

brnt00: No. Depression starts when you realize you have to work for a living and will need to dedicate the majority of your time to work until you are dead.


Aren't you just a coddled little snowflake.
 
2013-10-10 11:31:32 AM

Lord Dimwit: The article talks about how treating the mother's depression while pregnant will lower the (possibly slightly increased) risk of depression in the child, but how does that compare to the risks to the fetus of antidepressants while pregnant?


I was told several times never to get pregnant while on antidepressants because there were no long-term studies done on possible birth defects. Now, I see commercials from law firms all the time, "if you or someone you love was on antidepressants & had a child with birth defects..." I opted to play it safe & never get pregnant.

Sad part is, taking antidepressants also disqualified me from adopting. :~(

/damned if you do, damned if you don't
 
2013-10-10 11:40:55 AM
I don't have enough information on the topic to form a valid opinion -- though within the last 40 years, it appears that nearly everything affects the fetus in the womb.

Depression can be situational or genetic. The majority of antidepressants, like most other medications, have side effects, which, IMO, might not be wise to expose a developing fetus to.

Today's lifestyle is much more complex and confusing than your great-grandparents, with a much greater exposure to pollutants in the environment, including radiation from all of those nuclear bomb tests in the 50's and 60's. The mass expansion of the automobile alone has spread a host of pollutants across the globe that were not there in the 1800's. Including much higher levels of lead.

Then, since the early 1900's, the levels of Mercury found in food, especially fish, have soared and all of these contaminates can be absorbed into the body, affecting a developing fetus.

If you live in a large city, your exposure to contaminates becomes hundreds of times more than if you live in a small one along with the day to day stress.

So, essentially, IMO, there are far too many factors which could affect a developing fetus to consider than just the state of the mother's mental health.

I can't consider the study as complete, since it doesn't seem to take in other contributing factors.
 
2013-10-10 11:45:55 AM
Vidwiz:
I have been paying lots of money for Child Support for 8 years and my daughter turns 18 in 148 days - but who's counting....ME!!

Sweet titty!  Once she turns 18 you'll never have to lift a finger to help her make her way in the world again!

ikanreed:
Problematically, not everything that's congenital is genetic(and many that are aren't 100% genetic).

Trying to explain "genetic" to the average layman is like trying to explain geometry to a chimpanzee.  I feel bad for average parents of children with epigenetic disorders, they might as well be told "a wizard did it".

/molecular biologist, still struggle to understand epigenetics
 
2013-10-10 11:50:47 AM

Mr. Eugenides: brnt00: No. Depression starts when you realize you have to work for a living and will need to dedicate the majority of your time to work until you are dead.

Aren't you just a coddled little snowflake.


More akin to being a realist; realizing that the most enjoyable, low stress, days of my life are behind me and there is little left to take comfort in or look forward to in comparison.  But hey, whatever makes you feel good.  Here's your participation trophy for helping out with the thread.
 
2013-10-10 11:54:09 AM

brnt00: No. Depression starts when you realize you have to work for a living and will need to dedicate the majority of your time to work until you are dead.


Sounds like you need a better job.  I suggest a career which involves only telling other people what to do.  Then "work" only consists of checking to see how much money other people have made for you today, and biatching if it isnt enough.

/Try harder to be born rich next time, geez
 
2013-10-10 12:15:01 PM

brnt00: Mr. Eugenides: brnt00: No. Depression starts when you realize you have to work for a living and will need to dedicate the majority of your time to work until you are dead.

Aren't you just a coddled little snowflake.

More akin to being a realist; realizing that the most enjoyable, low stress, days of my life are behind me and there is little left to take comfort in or look forward to in comparison.  But hey, whatever makes you feel good.  Here's your participation trophy for helping out with the thread.


I'm guessing you have quite a lot of them.
 
2013-10-10 12:47:54 PM
I would just take the anti-depressants after the first trimester...when the baby might have a chance of cleft palate.  Studies show better birth outcomes for women on their meds.
 
2013-10-10 01:14:21 PM

brnt00: No. Depression starts when you realize you have to work for a living and will need to dedicate the majority of your time to work until you are dead.


No. Depression starts in all sorts of places. Mine started in elementary school. And was definitely influenced by my mother's depression. She refused to treat it, we all paid the price. That's the way life goes sometimes. And honestly, I'm looking forward to getting back out of school (grad student) and working again. I miss the diminished stress.

Depression is also part of why I won't have kids, because I know that there is a decent potential that I'll pass it along, and I know that it isn't great to be on my meds during pregnancy, and I know it isn't great to be off my meds during pregnancy. And because I remember what it was like growing up with a depressed parent. Of course, there's also a bunch of other reasons that I made that decision and am sticking to it, independent of my mother's begging for grandkids, but the depression was a major consideration.
 
2013-10-10 03:02:37 PM

Vidwiz: I have been paying lots of money for Child Support for 8 years and my daughter turns 18 in 148 days - but who's counting....ME!!


Just a note:

At least in Michigan, child support is until the kid turns 18 OR until the kid graduates high school, whichever is later.

No Such Agency: Sweet titty!  Once she turns 18 you'll never have to lift a finger to help her make her way in the world again!


Having been the kid on the back side of that divorce, a lot of times, the one parent hates the other parent and hates giving them money that doesn't go to the kid.

For example, my father (income: $46-28K from start to end of divorce) paid about $10K/year of child support and shared expenses to my mother (income: $95-72K) because child support was SOLELY based on where the kids slept and Dad had to be at work at 5AM.  This paid for a lot of vacations jumping around the country instead of a college fund.  Holy crap, he was bitter about that.  Especially because about 2/3rds of that was shared expenses that he had no control over, but had to pay for anyways.

At the same time, largely because his generation of Meyers is incredibly dysfunctional about money (13 kids, unemployed parents, he started working at 11 because they couldn't afford to buy him clothing) and they collectively decided that my generation was ALSO going to be dysfunctional about money, but in the opposite direction (My one uncle delivers pizzas to pay for his married, 30-year-old daughter's cell phone bills.  Yeah.), my graduation gift from him was a grand.  My sister got $1500 from him and a grand from our rich uncle to help pay for her Europe trip (Mom gave $500, and my sister made up the other $3K through garage sale and jobs) and even more money when she did graduate high school.  I did the math once, and I think that he was, on average, funneling between 5-20% of his after-tax/after-child support income to us in the form of cash, gift cards, and clothing (which I'm only mentioning because I just now ran out of shoes that he had stockpiled in my closet back in 2008, and he recently shipped me 6 pairs of jeans across the country when I mentioned in passing that my local stores didn't carry my size).  And then because he needed to pay the electric bill, he'd pull money out of the jar and replace with it an IOU, but hey.
 
2013-10-10 03:19:19 PM
meyerkev:
For example, my father (income: $46-28K from start to end of divorce) paid about $10K/year of child support and shared expenses to my mother (income: $95-72K) because child support was SOLELY based on where the kids slept and Dad had to be at work at 5AM.

Unfortunately I suspect that for every case like yours there are like, ten guys who see "child support" = "my money going to that biatch" and will do damn near anything to avoid paying.  I keep hearing these stories about deadbeats who are willing to live in someone's shed and work under the table for cash, rather than pay any support.  Also, unless your state is run by total assholes I assume support and custody laws are a little more balanced these days (since women cannot always be assumed to be the lower wage earners any more).
 
2013-10-10 04:05:58 PM

StandsWithAFist: Lord Dimwit: The article talks about how treating the mother's depression while pregnant will lower the (possibly slightly increased) risk of depression in the child, but how does that compare to the risks to the fetus of antidepressants while pregnant?

I was told several times never to get pregnant while on antidepressants because there were no long-term studies done on possible birth defects. Now, I see commercials from law firms all the time, "if you or someone you love was on antidepressants & had a child with birth defects..." I opted to play it safe & never get pregnant.

Sad part is, taking antidepressants also disqualified me from adopting. :~(

/damned if you do, damned if you don't


Really? Taking anti-depressants disqualifies you from adopting? That is shocking to me, it really is strange. Is it that way nationally or just in your state? I'm very sorry to hear you were turned down because of such a commonly medicated condition. It's strange, to me, that a person who is smart enough to seek treatment would be considered a risky placement. You can always try to adopt out of country if that is finachial possibility.
 
2013-10-10 04:37:12 PM

EStau: StandsWithAFist: Lord Dimwit: The article talks about how treating the mother's depression while pregnant will lower the (possibly slightly increased) risk of depression in the child, but how does that compare to the risks to the fetus of antidepressants while pregnant?

I was told several times never to get pregnant while on antidepressants because there were no long-term studies done on possible birth defects. Now, I see commercials from law firms all the time, "if you or someone you love was on antidepressants & had a child with birth defects..." I opted to play it safe & never get pregnant.

Sad part is, taking antidepressants also disqualified me from adopting. :~(

/damned if you do, damned if you don't

Really? Taking anti-depressants disqualifies you from adopting? That is shocking to me, it really is strange. Is it that way nationally or just in your state? I'm very sorry to hear you were turned down because of such a commonly medicated condition. It's strange, to me, that a person who is smart enough to seek treatment would be considered a risky placement. You can always try to adopt out of country if that is finachial possibility.


When my husband & I looked into adopting (about 10 years ago), this was common practice in Pennsylvania. Specifically, if you had been on antidepressants within the last 5 years, you were considered a risky placement. (You can do a google search on "antidepressant use adoption" for more on the topic). While I understand adoption agencies don't want to hand kids over to just anyone, many women are prescribed antidepressants to cope with infertility...the catch-22 is, it disqualifies you. I was also told that, for open adoptions, most bio mothers also have a problem handing over their child to a women with 'a history of mental health treatment'.

Foreign countries are even more stringent (esp. nowadays) with antidepressant use, so that wasn't going to be any help for us either. We didn't have the $$$ to do a foreign adoption anyway. After examining all our options - and much soul searching - we decided against adoption.
 
2013-10-11 03:11:27 AM

StandsWithAFist: EStau: StandsWithAFist: Lord Dimwit: The article talks about how treating the mother's depression while pregnant will lower the (possibly slightly increased) risk of depression in the child, but how does that compare to the risks to the fetus of antidepressants while pregnant?

I was told several times never to get pregnant while on antidepressants because there were no long-term studies done on possible birth defects. Now, I see commercials from law firms all the time, "if you or someone you love was on antidepressants & had a child with birth defects..." I opted to play it safe & never get pregnant.

Sad part is, taking antidepressants also disqualified me from adopting. :~(

/damned if you do, damned if you don't

Really? Taking anti-depressants disqualifies you from adopting? That is shocking to me, it really is strange. Is it that way nationally or just in your state? I'm very sorry to hear you were turned down because of such a commonly medicated condition. It's strange, to me, that a person who is smart enough to seek treatment would be considered a risky placement. You can always try to adopt out of country if that is finachial possibility.

When my husband & I looked into adopting (about 10 years ago), this was common practice in Pennsylvania. Specifically, if you had been on antidepressants within the last 5 years, you were considered a risky placement. (You can do a google search on "antidepressant use adoption" for more on the topic). While I understand adoption agencies don't want to hand kids over to just anyone, many women are prescribed antidepressants to cope with infertility...the catch-22 is, it disqualifies you. I was also told that, for open adoptions, most bio mothers also have a problem handing over their child to a women with 'a history of mental health treatment'.

Foreign countries are even more stringent (esp. nowadays) with antidepressant use, so that wasn't going to be any help for us either. We didn't have the $$$ to do a foreign adopti ...


That's HORRIBLE. The kids going up for adoption have had a really rough time, and, quite probably, have some congenital mental health problems of their own. Overcoming depression makes a person a lot more empathetic toward others who suffer similar problems, and a lot more knowledgeable about what's likely to help. So the only people "qualified" to adopt are either extremely chipper and resilient, or have never had serious trauma, or have (usually religious bs) objections to standard mental health care? JFC. Outrage overload.
 
2013-10-11 07:12:34 AM

Luthien's Tempest: brnt00: No. Depression starts when you realize you have to work for a living and will need to dedicate the majority of your time to work until you are dead.

No. Depression starts in all sorts of places. Mine started in elementary school. And was definitely influenced by my mother's depression. She refused to treat it, we all paid the price. That's the way life goes sometimes. And honestly, I'm looking forward to getting back out of school (grad student) and working again. I miss the diminished stress.

Depression is also part of why I won't have kids, because I know that there is a decent potential that I'll pass it along, and I know that it isn't great to be on my meds during pregnancy, and I know it isn't great to be off my meds during pregnancy. And because I remember what it was like growing up with a depressed parent. Of course, there's also a bunch of other reasons that I made that decision and am sticking to it, independent of my mother's begging for grandkids, but the depression was a major consideration.


Good for you, depression is horrendous and I wouldn't wish it on anyone. I wish more people were as considerate of the burdens their children would potentially face as the result of some bad genes. It's amazing how aware people are of not taking medications etc while pregnant yet will completely ignore the fact that it is the genes they have that might not be the sort that should be passed on in the first place.
 
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