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(The Atlantic)   Ten mind-blowing global economic trends you had no idea were ruling the world. All in all, there's only one BRIC to care about at all   (theatlantic.com) divider line 40
    More: Interesting, BRIC, Rule the World, market trends, Vanguard, shale gas, Kyoto Protocol  
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3686 clicks; posted to Business » on 09 Oct 2013 at 9:23 PM (44 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-10-09 09:29:02 PM
Ten mind blowing

And that's where I stopped
 
2013-10-09 09:36:48 PM
In fact, rooftop solar panels are becoming so popular that utility companies are trying to tax solar power in order to pay for grid maintenance!

They're doing more than that.

Are Utility Companies Out to Destroy Solar's 'Rooftop Revolution'?

In California, customers who install solar systems and battery arrays are finding themselves cut off from grid
 
2013-10-09 09:41:05 PM
 
2013-10-09 09:53:38 PM
Asians are moving here at a rate of about half a million a year, and the Asian-American percentage of the population has already reached 6%.

They should have mentioned which nationalities and percentages but I'm going to guess a large number of them are Chinese.
 
2013-10-09 10:07:27 PM
So who is buying Uncle Sam's debt? Regular Americans like you and me. Most of the national debt is money we Americans owe to each other, not to foreigners, and this is becoming more true, not less.

No, not regular Americans like you and me. The fed is buying half our debt. And when the fed hints that it may slow down, that's when the Chinese and Japanese start dumping.
 
2013-10-09 10:23:26 PM
1. Solar is not really going to take off until there's an economically competitive way of storing the power. Which may happen soon. Big, dumb molten salt batteries.

2. I'll believe the "Latinization" of America is ending when the number of Spanish TV channels/radio stations start to drop. Until then, I'll believe the article's claim is liberal propaganda. All I see now is the emergence of a separate Latin culture that may lead to the balkanization of America.

3. The Chinese are paying for their one child policy big time. I like to see dropping populations. The worker shortage can be addressed with increased automation, and dropping populations ease the load on the biosphere.

4. Moar nuclear power, plz. Let's kick CO2 in the nutz!

5. Anything that tears down these damm left wing indoctrination camps know as "colleges" is fine by me.

6. Deeply suspicious of lots of mass transit. Gives the government more control over our movements, impacting political freedom.

7. De-regulate the healthcare industry to get rid of monstrously overpriced doctors and tests. Xrays should be every bit as easy and cheap to get as making Xerox copies.

8. Whatever. The Chinese are smart. They'll eventually play nice. It's more profitable.

9. Whatever. Money follows the smart path.

10. Well OK then.
 
2013-10-09 10:27:19 PM
i43.tinypic.com
 
2013-10-09 10:31:14 PM

Gergesa: Asians are moving here at a rate of about half a million a year, and the Asian-American percentage of the population has already reached 6%.

They should have mentioned which nationalities and percentages but I'm going to guess a large number of them are Chinese.


Just curious - do Americans follow British usage and refer to Indians and Pakistanis as Asians?

NZ/Aust Asians = SE Asia (Indonesia, Thailand, Viet etc), China, sometimes Japanese
 
2013-10-09 10:48:43 PM

mark12A: 1. Solar is not really going to take off until there's an economically competitive way of storing the power. Which may happen soon. Big, dumb molten salt batteries.


Sure, for large-scale implementation that will be important.  If the panels get cheap enough though nothing would prevent more people from installing them to provide power when the sun is out and then falling back onto the grid at night and during times when the sun isn't shining.  The biggest chunk of my power bill is the air conditioner, and that's runs the hardest during the day when it's hottest.  Solar panels to provide free energy during that time would cut my electric bill by a lot.  Right now they're still too pricey for it to make sense though.

2. I'll believe the "Latinization" of America is ending when the number of Spanish TV channels/radio stations start to drop. Until then, I'll believe the article's claim is liberal propaganda. All I see now is the emergence of a separate Latin culture that may lead to the balkanization of America.

Embrace it.  The food is great, the music is fun, the women are sexy, it's a good thing.

4. Moar nuclear power, plz. Let's kick CO2 in the nutz!

I agree.  We need to start pressuring the Chinese heavily on their CO2 output though, there's is trending up steeply while ours trends down.

5. Anything that tears down these damm left wing indoctrination camps know as "colleges" is fine by me.

Well educated people tend to be more liberal.  This isn't because colleges 'indoctrinate' anyone, but rather after developing your critical thinking skills and expanding your world view most people realize that liberal policies just make more sense.

6. Deeply suspicious of lots of mass transit. Gives the government more control over our movements, impacting political freedom.

That sounds like a tin-foil hat theory.  Still, mass-transit will also be an also-ran here.  Most of our cities aren't set up for it, and the costs to change that would be astronomical.  Fast rail point-to-point lines between major cities would be a welcome convenience though.

7. De-regulate the healthcare industry to get rid of monstrously overpriced doctors and tests. Xrays should be every bit as easy and cheap to get as making Xerox copies.

There are a lot of things we could do to reduce costs.  Push for more residency spots in med schools to increase the pool of doctors and let natural market forces drive wages down, allow RNs, NPs, and PAs to perform more procedures without doctor supervision, regulate the pharmaceutical industry more heavily and limit advertising and how they interact with doctors/push meds, or best of all do all of that plus go single-payer so that costs can be controlled centrally by the government.
 
2013-10-09 10:51:26 PM

mjjt: Gergesa: Asians are moving here at a rate of about half a million a year, and the Asian-American percentage of the population has already reached 6%.

They should have mentioned which nationalities and percentages but I'm going to guess a large number of them are Chinese.

Just curious - do Americans follow British usage and refer to Indians and Pakistanis as Asians?

NZ/Aust Asians = SE Asia (Indonesia, Thailand, Viet etc), China, sometimes Japanese




No, we call them WOGS.
 
2013-10-09 10:52:32 PM

mjjt: Gergesa: Asians are moving here at a rate of about half a million a year, and the Asian-American percentage of the population has already reached 6%.

They should have mentioned which nationalities and percentages but I'm going to guess a large number of them are Chinese.

Just curious - do Americans follow British usage and refer to Indians and Pakistanis as Asians?

NZ/Aust Asians = SE Asia (Indonesia, Thailand, Viet etc), China, sometimes Japanese


Not generally. The region in the US is usually called "Indochina." I think if you'd get a reaction like this: "Well, no they aren't Asians, they're Indians." We seem to consider them and Australia their own things.

/hate to say it, but it's probably a color thing. Indians aren't yellow, therefore not asian, no matter the proximity.
 
2013-10-09 10:57:02 PM

mjjt: Gergesa: Asians are moving here at a rate of about half a million a year, and the Asian-American percentage of the population has already reached 6%.

They should have mentioned which nationalities and percentages but I'm going to guess a large number of them are Chinese.

Just curious - do Americans follow British usage and refer to Indians and Pakistanis as Asians?

NZ/Aust Asians = SE Asia (Indonesia, Thailand, Viet etc), China, sometimes Japanese


Not around New England, generally. Indians are Indians (and the local tribes are referred to by their tribe name), and Pakistanis are... well it's best not said in polite company.
 
2013-10-09 10:59:34 PM

fusillade762: In fact, rooftop solar panels are becoming so popular that utility companies are trying to tax solar power in order to pay for grid maintenance!

They're doing more than that.

Are Utility Companies Out to Destroy Solar's 'Rooftop Revolution'?

In California, customers who install solar systems and battery arrays are finding themselves cut off from grid


Home solar that pumps power into the grid pushes heavy costs onto the utility.  When your solar ramps up, the utility has to pay you retail while they have to ramp down something else on the grid.  When solar is miniscule it's a miniscule issue.  But if you have just 1% or 2% solar it becomes an issue.  Take it up to 5% and clouds rolling over a valley can lead to brownouts.
 
2013-10-09 11:03:50 PM

mjjt: Gergesa: Asians are moving here at a rate of about half a million a year, and the Asian-American percentage of the population has already reached 6%.

They should have mentioned which nationalities and percentages but I'm going to guess a large number of them are Chinese.

Just curious - do Americans follow British usage and refer to Indians and Pakistanis as Asians?

NZ/Aust Asians = SE Asia (Indonesia, Thailand, Viet etc), China, sometimes Japanese


I can only speak for my area but although it obvious that Indians and Pakistanis are Asians, when the word Asian is used in common usage it generally refers to Koreans, Japanese, Chinese, Thai, Vietnamese and so on.  Usually Indians are mentally categorized as separate even though really they aren't.
 
2013-10-09 11:06:48 PM

mark12A: 6. Deeply suspicious of lots of mass transit. Gives the government more control over our movements, impacting political freedom.


www.relativelyinteresting.com
 
2013-10-09 11:10:40 PM
11. Old trend: Journalism supported by ads
New trend: Listicles and click bait drive ad sales
 
2013-10-09 11:11:26 PM
Before I read the article, my guess is "Buick is THE luxury car of China".
 
2013-10-09 11:16:30 PM
Facts instead of perception.

What a concept.
 
2013-10-09 11:39:30 PM
China's growth numbers are largely fiction, by their own admission. It is very plausible based on the accounts of economic stagnation in several key areas that they are contracting. Anyone who takes their scheduled growth numbers at face value should be ignored.

China is also a giant debt driven party that even the experts have trouble wrapping their heads around. While their had certainly been a staggering amount of economic achievement, it won't live up to our fears and hysteria.
 
2013-10-10 12:19:02 AM

b2theory: China's growth numbers are largely fiction, by their own admission. It is very plausible based on the accounts of economic stagnation in several key areas that they are contracting. Anyone who takes their scheduled growth numbers at face value should be ignored.

China is also a giant debt driven party that even the experts have trouble wrapping their heads around. While their had certainly been a staggering amount of economic achievement, it won't live up to our fears and hysteria.


Like say.... Japan?

I swear though I had seen a government report that people were driving more than ever?
 
2013-10-10 12:20:02 AM

mark12A: 6. Deeply suspicious of lots of mass transit. Gives the government more control over our movements, impacting political freedom.


And who decided where the roads would be built?
 
2013-10-10 12:22:40 AM

12349876: mark12A: 6. Deeply suspicious of lots of mass transit. Gives the government more control over our movements, impacting political freedom.

And who decided where the roads would be built?


Hey, a walking population is much easier to control than a super mobile one, but have you seen the difficulties in getting walking paths put into a city?
 
2013-10-10 12:36:19 AM
Remember when gas cost a buck a gallon? If so: Congratulations, you're old. With gasoline more-or-less permanently at $4, Americans are finally adjusting their lifestyles,   even as unemployment falls. Meanwhile, rail traffic is up, with Amtrak since 1997.

Yeah, i remember. It was way back in 1999. You know, apparently, when gas was so expensive everyone took the train.

/just because you pull random thoughts out of your ass does not make it an article.
 
2013-10-10 12:58:00 AM

Gergesa: Asians are moving here at a rate of about half a million a year, and the Asian-American percentage of the population has already reached 6%.

They should have mentioned which nationalities and percentages but I'm going to guess a large number of them are Chinese.


More Asians in the US means more Asian drivers on the road, so more people have obviously switched to mass transit for their own safety.
 
2013-10-10 01:14:36 AM

mark12A: 1. Solar is not really going to take off until there's an economically competitive way of storing the power. Which may happen soon. Big, dumb molten salt batteries.

2. I'll believe the "Latinization" of America is ending when the number of Spanish TV channels/radio stations start to drop. Until then, I'll believe the article's claim is liberal propaganda. All I see now is the emergence of a separate Latin culture that may lead to the balkanization of America.

3. The Chinese are paying for their one child policy big time. I like to see dropping populations. The worker shortage can be addressed with increased automation, and dropping populations ease the load on the biosphere.

4. Moar nuclear power, plz. Let's kick CO2 in the nutz!

5. Anything that tears down these damm left wing indoctrination camps know as "colleges" is fine by me.

6. Deeply suspicious of lots of mass transit. Gives the government more control over our movements, impacting political freedom.

7. De-regulate the healthcare industry to get rid of monstrously overpriced doctors and tests. Xrays should be every bit as easy and cheap to get as making Xerox copies.

8. Whatever. The Chinese are smart. They'll eventually play nice. It's more profitable.

9. Whatever. Money follows the smart path.

10. Well OK then.


Preach it, brother. Keep your socialism out of our math and science classes. If Susie has nine apples and gives Jimmy three apples, burn down the government for taking her apples and giving them to do-nothing Jimmy.
 
2013-10-10 03:23:52 AM

Mr. Eugenides: fusillade762: In fact, rooftop solar panels are becoming so popular that utility companies are trying to tax solar power in order to pay for grid maintenance!

They're doing more than that.

Are Utility Companies Out to Destroy Solar's 'Rooftop Revolution'?

In California, customers who install solar systems and battery arrays are finding themselves cut off from grid

Home solar that pumps power into the grid pushes heavy costs onto the utility.  When your solar ramps up, the utility has to pay you retail while they have to ramp down something else on the grid.  When solar is miniscule it's a miniscule issue.  But if you have just 1% or 2% solar it becomes an issue.  Take it up to 5% and clouds rolling over a valley can lead to brownouts.


Except in Germany, where they are far more along the solar path than the US, they never have any 'brownout' problems.  It's all a fallacy put forth by the fossil fuel industries, the grid can handle solar and wind just fine.  The price of wholesale power in Germany is plunging due to renewables, it's a trend that's just going to accelerate.  Germany will soon (probably in 3 years) generate nearly 100% of its power on some summer days from renewable sources.  The plummeting cost of solar is making it a no-brainer in more places every day, despite all of the utilities' hand-wringing.  More power generated at the point-of-use is a good thing, even though it means less money for the big generators.
 
2013-10-10 08:31:02 AM

HempHead: mjjt: Gergesa: Asians are moving here at a rate of about half a million a year, and the Asian-American percentage of the population has already reached 6%.

They should have mentioned which nationalities and percentages but I'm going to guess a large number of them are Chinese.

Just curious - do Americans follow British usage and refer to Indians and Pakistanis as Asians?

NZ/Aust Asians = SE Asia (Indonesia, Thailand, Viet etc), China, sometimes Japanese



No, we call them WOGS.


Morning Major! He's started early.
 
2013-10-10 08:32:58 AM

tricycleracer: Before I read the article, my guess is "Buick is THE luxury car of China".


There certainly are a lot of Buicks in China.
 
2013-10-10 08:36:40 AM

meat0918: b2theory: China's growth numbers are largely fiction, by their own admission. It is very plausible based on the accounts of economic stagnation in several key areas that they are contracting. Anyone who takes their scheduled growth numbers at face value should be ignored.

China is also a giant debt driven party that even the experts have trouble wrapping their heads around. While their had certainly been a staggering amount of economic achievement, it won't live up to our fears and hysteria.

Like say.... Japan?

I swear though I had seen a government report that people were driving more than ever?


There are a lot of cars. And lots of KFCs and Pizza Huts.

The whole city I visited (Xi'an) was lit up like Christmas at night time. And it's a huge city yet not one of their biggest.
 
2013-10-10 08:39:02 AM

Mad_Radhu: Gergesa: Asians are moving here at a rate of about half a million a year, and the Asian-American percentage of the population has already reached 6%.

They should have mentioned which nationalities and percentages but I'm going to guess a large number of them are Chinese.

More Asians in the US means more Asian drivers on the road, so more people have obviously switched to mass transit for their own safety.


I'll grant you that middle aged Asians (or Koreans at least) are horrible drivers but the young are quite adept behind the wheel.
 
2013-10-10 10:18:13 AM

Incontinent_dog_and_monkey_rodeo: Home solar that pumps power into the grid pushes heavy costs onto the utility. When your solar ramps up, the utility has to pay you retail while they have to ramp down something else on the grid. When solar is miniscule it's a miniscule issue. But if you have just 1% or 2% solar it becomes an issue. Take it up to 5% and clouds rolling over a valley can lead to brownouts.

Except in Germany, where they are far more along the solar path than the US, they never have any 'brownout' problems. It's all a fallacy put forth by the fossil fuel industries, the grid can handle solar and wind just fine. The price of wholesale power in Germany is plunging due to renewables, it's a trend that's just going to accelerate. Germany will soon (probably in 3 years) generate nearly 100% of its power on some summer days from renewable sources. The plummeting cost of solar is making it a no-brainer in more places every day, despite all of the utilities' hand-wringing. More power generated at the point-of-use is a good thing, even though it means less money for the big generators.


You might want to ask the folks who operate the grid in the Czech Republic what they think of the wonderful German solar generation.
 
2013-10-10 11:20:27 AM

Mr. Eugenides: Incontinent_dog_and_monkey_rodeo: Home solar that pumps power into the grid pushes heavy costs onto the utility. When your solar ramps up, the utility has to pay you retail while they have to ramp down something else on the grid. When solar is miniscule it's a miniscule issue. But if you have just 1% or 2% solar it becomes an issue. Take it up to 5% and clouds rolling over a valley can lead to brownouts.

Except in Germany, where they are far more along the solar path than the US, they never have any 'brownout' problems. It's all a fallacy put forth by the fossil fuel industries, the grid can handle solar and wind just fine. The price of wholesale power in Germany is plunging due to renewables, it's a trend that's just going to accelerate. Germany will soon (probably in 3 years) generate nearly 100% of its power on some summer days from renewable sources. The plummeting cost of solar is making it a no-brainer in more places every day, despite all of the utilities' hand-wringing. More power generated at the point-of-use is a good thing, even though it means less money for the big generators.

You might want to ask the folks who operate the grid in the Czech Republic what they think of the wonderful German solar generation.


It's costing them money, so their pissed.
 
2013-10-10 11:27:08 AM
FTFA:  Remember when gas cost a buck a gallon? If so: Congratulations, you're old.

*raises hand, feebly*
 
2013-10-10 01:19:04 PM

Peter von Nostrand: Ten mind blowing

And that's where I stopped


Discover how to watch the world economy with this ten weird tricks.
 
2013-10-10 01:19:40 PM

flaminio: FTFA:  Remember when gas cost a buck a gallon? If so: Congratulations, you're old.

*raises hand, feebly*


Dude, I remember driving out west and getting scalped at a last chance gas station for $0.45 a gallon.
 
2013-10-10 02:20:59 PM
The big secret of the global economy?  It's all done with magnets.
 
2013-10-10 02:48:43 PM

Mr. Eugenides: flaminio: FTFA:  Remember when gas cost a buck a gallon? If so: Congratulations, you're old.

*raises hand, feebly*

Dude, I remember driving out west and getting scalped at a last chance gas station for $0.45 a gallon.


Your lawn looks great. Don't worry; I won't step on it.
 
2013-10-10 03:44:37 PM

Mr. Eugenides: fusillade762: In fact, rooftop solar panels are becoming so popular that utility companies are trying to tax solar power in order to pay for grid maintenance!

They're doing more than that.

Are Utility Companies Out to Destroy Solar's 'Rooftop Revolution'?

In California, customers who install solar systems and battery arrays are finding themselves cut off from grid

Home solar that pumps power into the grid pushes heavy costs onto the utility.  When your solar ramps up, the utility has to pay you retail while they have to ramp down something else on the grid.  When solar is miniscule it's a miniscule issue.  But if you have just 1% or 2% solar it becomes an issue.  Take it up to 5% and clouds rolling over a valley can lead to brownouts.


I live in Hawaii, and the electric company here actually encourages installation of rooftop solar.  Of course Hawaii is unique, since most power plants are oil fired, and it costs a lot to get it here because we're in the middle of nowhere.
 
2013-10-10 03:58:12 PM

mark12A: I'll believe the "Latinization" of America is ending when the number of Spanish TV channels/radio stations start to drop. Until then, I'll believe the article's claim is liberal propaganda. All I see now is the emergence of a separate Latin culture that may lead to the balkanization of America.


Mexicans are assimilating more quickly than the Irish, Chinese, Italian, etc. immigrant wave did. But they don't cluster in ghettos, and mainstream businesses cater to the recently immigrated, so we notice them more.
 
2013-10-10 04:42:36 PM

kevinfra: Mr. Eugenides: fusillade762: In fact, rooftop solar panels are becoming so popular that utility companies are trying to tax solar power in order to pay for grid maintenance!

They're doing more than that.

Are Utility Companies Out to Destroy Solar's 'Rooftop Revolution'?

In California, customers who install solar systems and battery arrays are finding themselves cut off from grid

Home solar that pumps power into the grid pushes heavy costs onto the utility.  When your solar ramps up, the utility has to pay you retail while they have to ramp down something else on the grid.  When solar is miniscule it's a miniscule issue.  But if you have just 1% or 2% solar it becomes an issue.  Take it up to 5% and clouds rolling over a valley can lead to brownouts.

I live in Hawaii, and the electric company here actually encourages installation of rooftop solar.  Of course Hawaii is unique, since most power plants are oil fired, and it costs a lot to get it here because we're in the middle of nowhere.


Hawaii has about 1/3 the population of Los Angeles, has a moderate climate which makes swing heating and cooling demands very low and the cooling demand rises with solar output and essentially zero transmission of electricity.  It also has very high fuel costs.  Add on the fact that it has the best sun wattage per square meter of any US location and solar makes a ton of sense in Hawaii.

In short, the Hawaiian model of rooftop solar will work for the rest of the country about as well as growing pineapple would.
 
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