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(WDSU New Orleans)   Bad news : You and three others are injured in a helicopter crash. Good news : You're all rescued and transported to a hospital. Mixed news : By helicopter   (wdsu.com) divider line 20
    More: Ironic, plane crashes, helicopters  
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1776 clicks; posted to Main » on 09 Oct 2013 at 2:30 PM (50 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



Voting Results (Smartest)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

2013-10-09 03:23:53 PM
2 votes:

RoyBatty: But all in all, I do wonder why they don't put some sort of floatie on the mast enough to keep the helicopter on it's side instead of flipping entirely.


Because all of the spinny stuff has to be in balance or very bad things happen.
2013-10-09 02:54:14 PM
2 votes:
www.wdsu.com
"Inflatables keep a helicopter upright following a crash in the Gulf of Mexico"

No... no they don't
2013-10-09 02:34:53 PM
2 votes:
Well if you get in a car accident, you will probably get transported to the hospital in a car. So what?
2013-10-10 11:32:34 AM
1 votes:
Did I stump fark? Or was it lack of interest?

Anyhoo, Google Michael Findlay.

/Oh and the link to pic, it is hot
2013-10-09 06:05:22 PM
1 votes:

durbnpoisn: Look at it this way...  If you were JUST in a helicopter accident, the odds are pretty well in your favor that it won't happen again anytime soon.

Sort of like when the plane crashed into the house in The World According to Garp.  "We'll take it.  What are the odds that will ever happen again?!"


Well, strictly speaking the odds are exactly the same as they were preceding the first crash.
2013-10-09 05:07:34 PM
1 votes:
Maybe it was this team?
shinetwork.com
2013-10-09 04:34:05 PM
1 votes:

James10952001: Well if you get in a car accident, you will probably get transported to the hospital in a car. So what?


Exactly. Subby is a bad person and should feel bad. A good throatpunch would probably teach him a lesson, too.
2013-10-09 04:26:57 PM
1 votes:
If I get in a car crash and an Ambulance takes me to the hospital, is it ironic?
2013-10-09 03:54:46 PM
1 votes:

costermonger: Lord_Dubu: Good thing steering wheels don't need to spin. Oh wait.
[snarkerati.com image 499x306]


I've never seen or heard about a steering wheel with flotation, anyway.
2013-10-09 03:49:03 PM
1 votes:

hardinparamedic: They're intended to keep the airframe from skinking, but don't provide enough balance or boyancy to keep it righted, especially after a hard landing or crash.


They're *supposed* to (at least some designs) keep shiat upright long enough to get out. If it's not a nice landing on relatively calm water, I wouldn't count on it, but it can happen:
i.imgur.com
2013-10-09 03:39:36 PM
1 votes:

Lord_Dubu: So no engineer could come up with say a rotor equivalent because of it's spinny stuff. Good thing steering wheels don't need to spin. Oh wait.


The main rotor of a 206 Jetranger rotates at 394RPM at minimum flight throttle, and the tail rotor spins nearly 3,000 RPM. Constantly.

How many RPM does a steering wheel constantly make?
2013-10-09 03:33:02 PM
1 votes:
(I'm sorry  Old_Chief_Scott  and hardinparamedic but in a discussion of floatation devices, Inflatable_Rhetoric has to be assumed the thread authority.)

Inflatable Rhetoric: RoyBatty: hardinparamedic: RoyBatty: Okay, so then would you prefer a helicopter with floaties on the skids that keep it upside down and not sinking, or would you prefer a helicopter with a huge floatie above the cabin around the rotor mast that kept it upright but sunk?

Huh? What are you asking. I'm just pointing something out. We're not having an argument about helicopter design.

If you had a helicopter designed to land on water, of course you'd want floats on the skids. In this case, however, the helicopter was not designed to land on water.

[aussiex.org image 440x440]  (gratuitous flight sim pic)

What you're seeing is a type of emergency float system which the pilot can deploy in the event of a water landing. (video in link) They're intended to keep the airframe from skinking, but don't provide enough balance or boyancy to keep it righted, especially after a hard landing or crash.


Oh, I'm not trying to argue. I'm thinking that as an okay but not great swimmer, and thinking back to "Top Gun", that I'd prefer a helicopter that was upright and underwater then a helicopter that was upside down.

But all in all, I do wonder why they don't put some sort of floatie on the mast enough to keep the helicopter on it's side instead of flipping entirely.

The mast rotates, makes it tougher to do.


Yeah, but there's still the roof of the chopper itself, if not around the mast. (Also, the Kiowa and Apache demonstrate how much shiat can be mounted on the rotor mast -- I've long wondered how out of balance those masts can get before the chopper disintegrates.)

I suspect as hardinparamedic suggests it's a weight issue, but still If I were flying over the water often, I'd much rather crawl out of a chopper lying on its side than one upside down in the drink.
2013-10-09 03:32:50 PM
1 votes:
Look at it this way...  If you were JUST in a helicopter accident, the odds are pretty well in your favor that it won't happen again anytime soon.

Sort of like when the plane crashed into the house in The World According to Garp.  "We'll take it.  What are the odds that will ever happen again?!"
2013-10-09 03:27:03 PM
1 votes:
www.dvddrive-in.com

Approves!

/obscure?
2013-10-09 03:24:46 PM
1 votes:

Dr Dreidel: "Water landing"? Or "crashing in the farking ocean"?


I argued that point with my instructor on one of my Critical Care tests because I chose "politically correct name for a crash" for the answer to "What is a Hard Landing?"

:)

RoyBatty: But all in all, I do wonder why they don't put some sort of floatie on the mast enough to keep the helicopter on it's side instead of flipping entirely.


One of the problems is weight. More weight you put on the frame to mount a flotational skid system is less weight you can carry on the frame in passengers. The other problem is that a helicopter with a floating skid system can't land on solid ground or on a helipad anymore. So if the helicopter is not meant to land in water, you create a big problem there.

Water landings are very risky, as well. There's a reason the coast guard doesn't use airframes that can do them anymore.

As for why not mount a float system on the upper part of the frame or near the collective, the issue is if you did that, it'd still flip anyway. The cabin is full of buoyant air. The issue is not a lack of flotation, it's that you have hundreds of pounds of fuel and a turbojet high on the frame.
2013-10-09 03:22:59 PM
1 votes:

RoyBatty: hardinparamedic: RoyBatty: Okay, so then would you prefer a helicopter with floaties on the skids that keep it upside down and not sinking, or would you prefer a helicopter with a huge floatie above the cabin around the rotor mast that kept it upright but sunk?

Huh? What are you asking. I'm just pointing something out. We're not having an argument about helicopter design.

If you had a helicopter designed to land on water, of course you'd want floats on the skids. In this case, however, the helicopter was not designed to land on water.

[aussiex.org image 440x440]  (gratuitous flight sim pic)

What you're seeing is a type of emergency float system which the pilot can deploy in the event of a water landing. (video in link) They're intended to keep the airframe from skinking, but don't provide enough balance or boyancy to keep it righted, especially after a hard landing or crash.


Oh, I'm not trying to argue. I'm thinking that as an okay but not great swimmer, and thinking back to "Top Gun", that I'd prefer a helicopter that was upright and underwater then a helicopter that was upside down.

But all in all, I do wonder why they don't put some sort of floatie on the mast enough to keep the helicopter on it's side instead of flipping entirely.


The mast rotates, makes it tougher to do.
2013-10-09 03:07:20 PM
1 votes:

RoyBatty: Okay, so then would you prefer a helicopter with floaties on the skids that keep it upside down and not sinking, or would you prefer a helicopter with a huge floatie above the cabin around the rotor mast that kept it upright but sunk?


Huh? What are you asking. I'm just pointing something out. We're not having an argument about helicopter design.

If you had a helicopter designed to land on water, of course you'd want floats on the skids. In this case, however, the helicopter was not designed to land on water.

aussiex.org  (gratuitous flight sim pic)

What you're seeing is a type of emergency float system which the pilot can deploy in the event of a water landing. (video in link) They're intended to keep the airframe from skinking, but don't provide enough balance or boyancy to keep it righted, especially after a hard landing or crash.
2013-10-09 02:53:53 PM
1 votes:

edmo: It be cool if those floaties kept it upright.


Yeah, they need to rework that caption just a tad.

Rent Party: Quite possibly the dumbest headline I've ever seen on Fark.  And that's saying a lot.


You need to pay more attention.
2013-10-09 02:36:21 PM
1 votes:
It be cool if those floaties kept it upright.
2013-10-09 02:34:27 PM
1 votes:
i.imgur.com
 
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