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(Space.com)   3D printed rocket engines? How could that ever be useful?   (space.com) divider line 25
    More: Interesting, launch site, cubesats, liquid oxygen, additive manufacturing, Marshall Space Flight Center  
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1255 clicks; posted to Geek » on 09 Oct 2013 at 10:53 AM (46 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



25 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-10-09 10:57:02 AM
Yes, because it was the CNC machining holding us back!

Also, clearly, the next step is to have this in our living rooms! Because it's so much cheaper and easier than buying Aerotech rocket motors at the hobby shop!

Just ignore all the other parts that weren't 3D printed, just focus on the one bolt, or nut, or decal!
 
2013-10-09 11:05:38 AM
Give it a rest.  If they had just called it "direct metal laser sintering" would you have even opened your pie-hole?  In this particular application, its the perfect technology for rapid prototyping.
 
2013-10-09 11:07:40 AM
In before you-know-wh...

Goddammit. Is there like a QA bat signal or something?
 
2013-10-09 11:10:11 AM

SansNeural: Give it a rest.  If they had just called it "direct metal laser sintering" would you have even opened your pie-hole?  In this particular application, its the perfect technology for rapid prototyping.


Actually, it may be one of the "perfect" applications of 3D printing.  Conformal cooling is a huge buzz phrase in the 3D printing community.  That is building one piece objects that have complicated cooling/fluid channels in them.  These sorts of channels cannot be cast into a piece nor can they be machined into a single piece object.

Liquid fueled rocket motors need to be cooled but also need to be strong.  A 3D printed motor which is one piece but includes integrated cooling might be just the ticket.
 
2013-10-09 11:11:30 AM

Gunther: In before you-know-wh...

Goddammit. Is there like a QA bat signal or something?


I'm pretty sure the headline was meant as a direct jab at QA, without actually saying it.
 
2013-10-09 11:12:44 AM

Quantum Apostrophe: Yes, because it was the CNC machining holding us back!

Also, clearly, the next step is to have this in our living rooms! Because it's so much cheaper and easier than buying Aerotech rocket motors at the hobby shop!

Just ignore all the other parts that weren't 3D printed, just focus on the one bolt, or nut, or decal!


Help us TechnoBevets, you're our only hope.
 
2013-10-09 11:13:00 AM
Quantum Apostrophe:Just ignore all the other parts that weren't 3D printed, just focus on the one bolt, or nut, or decal!

Or, you know, the entire combustion chamber...minor details.
 
2013-10-09 11:13:55 AM

Driedsponge: Gunther: In before you-know-wh...

Goddammit. Is there like a QA bat signal or something?

I'm pretty sure the headline was meant as a direct jab at QA, without actually saying it.


He either has something on a mod or admin, or he is the alt of a modmin, because his level of threadjacking would get anyone else banned.
 
2013-10-09 11:15:54 AM

Quantum Apostrophe: Yes, because it was the CNC machining holding us back!


And as Mr. Eugenides pointed out above, in this particular application, CNC machine is holding back the technology.  Being able to print nozzles with coolant cavities directly in the walls is a pretty big game-changer.
 
2013-10-09 11:36:37 AM
Great. When they can 3D print the fuel, we'll be all set.
 
2013-10-09 11:45:46 AM
Direct Metal Laser Scintering is quite a bit different from well, this garbage, made by even the expensive home 3D printers.
 

24.media.tumblr.com
www.staticwhich.co.uk
makezineblog.files.wordpress.com
resources2.news.com.au


/Best leave 3d printing to the experts for now.
 
2013-10-09 11:48:47 AM
I for one welcome our new 3D printed overlords...
 
2013-10-09 12:00:40 PM

ZeroCorpse: Great. When they can 3D print the fuel, we'll be all set.


Well there is that plan to send 5T of hydrogen to Mars and use the Co2 there to turn it into 100T of rocket fuel so we can get an expedition home.

Almost as good if you are not hung up on semantics.

Also this *is* 3D printing, it`s just 3D laser printing...
 
2013-10-09 12:29:36 PM
QA reads headline:

unrealitymag.bcmediagroup.netdna-cdn.com
 
2013-10-09 12:48:42 PM
I wonder what it's like to be so predictably retarded that even the mods are getting in on the fun by greenlighting stories just to watch and laugh as you lose your shiat in the Boobies.
 
2013-10-09 01:48:52 PM
3D printed rocket engines are meant to put people in SPAAAAAACE
 
2013-10-09 02:22:38 PM

Driedsponge: I'm pretty sure the headline was meant as a direct jab at QA, without actually saying it.


Exactly what I thought upon reading TFH.

And he fell for it...

2.bp.blogspot.com

Presuming he isn't the submitter, of course. You know...needing his attention fix.
 
2013-10-09 02:51:21 PM
Since we are kinda calling out certain people in thread headers now, can we talk about *cough*gor^2*cough*
 
2013-10-09 03:49:22 PM

fluffy2097: Direct Metal Laser Scintering is quite a bit different from well, this garbage, made by even the expensive home 3D printers.


Cute that you've chosen pictures of failures only.

Quantum Apostrophe: Yes, because it was the CNC machining holding us back!


It kinda was - building things using milling techniques has limitations that require multi-part assemblies and special, one-off tooling... and produce a lot of waste as a large, expensive billet is whittled down to size. It's an expensive and labor-intensive process.

Meanwhile, a 3D printer like the one used here can start with a bag of generic media and only the material that is actually incorporated into the final part gets consumed. You can create parts with complex internal structures that are impossible to machine and would otherwise require multiple components to be fabricated and assembled. Best of all, you can use cheap media to produce mock-up parts that are still as true to size and tolerance of production parts without any additional tooling. Hooray!
=Smidge=
 
2013-10-09 05:31:49 PM

Smidge204: fluffy2097: Direct Metal Laser Scintering is quite a bit different from well, this garbage, made by even the expensive home 3D printers.

Cute that you've chosen pictures of failures only.


From the reviews I've read, those are pictures of the common results. Even the successes don't look very good.
 
2013-10-09 05:42:57 PM

Smidge204: Cute that you've chosen pictures of failures only.


Ok Ok.  Here is a glass that was printed by a $2,000 home  3D printer. It printed perfectly as you can see.

img.gawkerassets.com

It's just that when you push weed whacker cord through a hot glue gun, and control it all with a LEGO Technic's set, 3D printing doesn't farking make anything useful.

makezineblog.files.wordpress.com
makezineblog.files.wordpress.com
makezineblog.files.wordpress.com

/It's not my fault that 3d printers fail so much it's easier to find examples of failures then successes that look any good or are functional.
 
2013-10-09 06:17:38 PM

Smidge204: It kinda was - building things using milling techniques has limitations that require multi-part assemblies and special, one-off tooling... and produce a lot of waste as a large, expensive billet is whittled down to size. It's an expensive and labor-intensive process.


That's not 100% true (though in general you are correct). Many mass produced items that have a lot of clearances (read: air contact) can be cast first, then machined in the areas where precision is needed. That reduces waste by >90% in some cases, and well over 75% in nearly all.

Though if one can print complex single piece items and then use classic strengthening/tempering techniques to get the grain proper, it would go a long way to reducing industrial waste, meaning less energy loss, cheaper and higher quality items.
 
2013-10-09 06:34:20 PM

ajgeek: Though if one can print complex single piece items and then use classic strengthening/tempering techniques to get the grain proper, it would go a long way to reducing industrial waste, meaning less energy loss, cheaper and higher quality items.


SpaceX is testing a 3d printed laser sintered metal component for mixing rocket fuel and oxidizer. Apparently they were able to take a 20 or more piece assembly, and fabricate it as a single part.

CNC always has that problem of having to be able to fit the cutter head wherever you want to cut things.
 
2013-10-09 07:16:54 PM

Tobin_Lam: From the reviews I've read, those are pictures of the common results. Even the successes don't look very good.


Like any tool, the results are dependent on the skill of the user.

It also helps if you're not searching for failures.

hardwired.cc

brainspl.at

farm8.staticflickr.com


The machines that produced those were all under $1000.

ajgeek: That's not 100% true (though in general you are correct). Many mass produced items that have a lot of clearances (read: air contact) can be cast first, then machined in the areas where precision is needed. That reduces waste by >90% in some cases, and well over 75% in nearly all.


Common in mass-production, but not so much in prototyping like the stuff in the article.
=Smidge=
 
2013-10-10 03:27:26 AM
fark that guy
 
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