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(Mother Nature Network)   Instead of being pestered by that incessant wailing, you can now get a smoke detector that quietly and calmly sends an alert to your smart phone or tablet   (mnn.com) divider line 54
    More: Cool, Nest Labs, Julie Andrews, Tony Fadell, wireless devices, smartphones, Harry McCracken  
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1230 clicks; posted to Main » on 09 Oct 2013 at 11:08 AM (27 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-10-10 09:14:58 AM

LadySusan: TNel: maxximillian: TNel: LadySusan: Although I certainly don't claim to be in my right mind, as an expert at burning things in my kitchen, I will definitely buy these. Could they somehow rig them so that I don't have to get a chair or ladder to change the battery? Could they also make it so that the compartment to open is incredibly simple? I do wonder how long the battery will last.

Just buy ones that are powered by the electric in your home instead of batteries.   All of mine are wired in and I never have to worry about them.

So what happens if the power goes out in your house?

I would bet they have a battery but i've never looked kind of like my CO meter that is plugged in but has a battery for when the power goes out.

I will admit to being crazy as a loon but does this mean I need  to hire an electrician to run wires through my ceiling? My house was built in 1947, I don't want to touch any of the electrical wires. I suspect that they will just turn to dust. Does just crimping up the modern ground wire lead to more fires because I've done that when installing the newfangled outlets. Red to red, black to black, huh, what's this third wire? Oh well.

Really, I think dying in my sleep from smoke inhalation is one of the better ways to go.


If you are handy enough you can do it yourself but DO NOT take the wire from the ceiling light and run it to the smoke alarm if that light is switched, the alarm will only be powered when the switch is on.  You can take the line before the switch and go to the alarm but never after.
 
2013-10-10 09:55:37 AM

TNel: If you are handy enough you can do it yourself but DO NOT take the wire from the ceiling light and run it to the smoke alarm if that light is switched, the alarm will only be powered when the switch is on. You can take the line before the switch and go to the alarm but never after.


Anyone who isn't absolutely 100% sure of what they are doing should NOT be goofing around with electrical. I keep telling my mom that. She insists on replacing fixtures and stuff because "her friend showed her how" and she "watches them do it on the teevee" and it terrifies me she's going zap herself or start a fire.

Seriously... if you don't know EXACTLY what you are doing before you begin don't do it. If you run into something weird you don't understand as you work put everything back the way it was and call a pro.
 
2013-10-10 10:50:38 AM

here to help: Anyone who isn't absolutely 100% sure of what they are doing should NOT be goofing around with electrical. I keep telling my mom that. She insists on replacing fixtures and stuff because "her friend showed her how" and she "watches them do it on the teevee" and it terrifies me she's going zap herself or start a fire.

Seriously... if you don't know EXACTLY what you are doing before you begin don't do it. If you run into something weird you don't understand as you work put everything back the way it was and call a pro.


Correct and sorry I should have put that in also.  If you are unsure at all just put it away and pay out the $80 an hour to have someone do it.
 
2013-10-10 11:11:45 AM

TNel: Correct and sorry I should have put that in also. If you are unsure at all just put it away and pay out the $80 an hour to have someone do it.


I almost got myself fried with 220 while installing a hot water tank. I researched the hell out of everything and even got my contractor boss to give a run down on what I should do. All was well and the moment of truth arrive and bingo! Everything worked. Then my know it all roommate started pestering me because he didn't like the way the wires were tucked in in the panel (they were fine). I was tired and he was frustrating me so just to shut him up I grabbed the pliers and went to nudge the wires in a little tighter. POW!!! In my haste I had neglected to turn the breaker back off again and the pliers nicked through the wire insulation. Fortunately they were good, well insulated pliers so I didn't get zapped. The jaws of the pliers had a pea size groove melted out of them. I do not think that would have felt good if it were my hand.

The moral of the story... even if you've done your homework and think everything's under control sh*t can happen. When I told my boss he gave me sh*t and vowed to NEVER give any more electrical advice to someone who wasn't an actual electrician or apprentice.
 
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