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(Daily Mail)   Woman uses L'Oreal Paris Revitalift Laser Renew anti-ageing products on her face and OMG DON'T EVER DO THAT (w/pics)   (dailymail.co.uk) divider line 62
    More: Scary, Anti-aging cream, European law, household goods, skin infections, Leicester Royal Infirmary  
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21325 clicks; posted to Main » on 09 Oct 2013 at 2:11 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-10-09 12:01:59 AM  
Some people have allergies. News at 11.
 
2013-10-09 12:28:47 AM  
Got her to stop worrying about wrinkles, didn't it?
 
2013-10-09 01:42:01 AM  
i.dailymail.co.uk

How do any of those warrant the use of the word "laser" in the name??
 
2013-10-09 02:15:11 AM  
I look forward to watching her youtube review.
 
2013-10-09 02:15:25 AM  
But, look how smooth that swelling and splotchiness!

I'd say it worked as advertised.
 
2013-10-09 02:15:45 AM  
Guess that whole "aging gracefully" thing is looking better by the minute.

/ jk, she's probably mainlining Oil of Olay
 
2013-10-09 02:16:31 AM  

doglover: Some people have allergies. News at 11.


Doglover didn't read the article and isn't interested in reality. As usual.
 
2013-10-09 02:19:30 AM  
pew pew pew

www.brainreleasevalve.com
 
2013-10-09 02:19:42 AM  
Who would have thought this movie would be so prescient

i149.photobucket.com
 
2013-10-09 02:20:17 AM  
Penicillin for an allergic reaction? Huh?
 
2013-10-09 02:20:28 AM  
I read that as something else

/it would be cool to have lasers

// ok maybe not sexy
 
2013-10-09 02:20:42 AM  
That's almost as bad as getting vitiligo from a skin cream.

http://mainichi.jp/english/english/newsselect/news/20130911p2a00m0na 03 5000c.html

OTOH, you said you wanted whiter skin...
 
2013-10-09 02:21:41 AM  

Quantum Apostrophe: doglover: Some people have allergies. News at 11.

Doglover didn't read the article and isn't interested in reality. As usual.


um, that's exactly what this article is about. I don't understand your comment.
 
2013-10-09 02:25:46 AM  
Methylisothiaminniacinzolincalzone.

That's bad.
 
2013-10-09 02:30:48 AM  
Should have read the instructions: "...first test clean a small inconspicuous area and then proceed with application if no damage occurred in the test area."
 
2013-10-09 02:43:24 AM  

doglover: Some people have allergies. News at 11.


farm3.staticflickr.com

"Avoid the following combinations: Revitalift by L'Oreal Paris Laser Renew Advanced Rejuvenating Day Moisturiser, Revitalift by L'Oreal Paris Laser Renew Serum, L'Oreal Paris Laser Renew Eye Cream."
 
2013-10-09 02:45:57 AM  

fusillade762: How do any of those warrant the use of the word "laser" in the name??


You're new to this whole 'marketing' thing aren't you? If you look closely you'll see plenty of spurious claims.
www.smbc-comics.com


phrawgh: Should have read the instructions


Pfft.. that requires engaging Brain and Brain's a killjoy who says "visible skin layers are dead and no amount of over-priced moisturizer is going to change this". Better to just slap it on and play pretend.
 
2013-10-09 03:04:57 AM  
FTA -  'When I went into my local chemist I spotted the L'Oreal Revitalift range and decided to give it a try, but it was the biggest mistake I ever made, after the reaction I had.'


Local chemist?  Really?  Why not just use trichloroethylene next time?  Exfoliates perfectly.
 
2013-10-09 03:16:24 AM  

ransack.: Quantum Apostrophe: doglover: Some people have allergies. News at 11.

Doglover didn't read the article and isn't interested in reality. As usual.

um, that's exactly what this article is about. I don't understand your comment.


Yeah, I didn't even have to read the article to get that, just the sub-headline

Products contain the ingredient methylisothiazolinone, which has been blamed on a surge in allergic reactions
 
2013-10-09 03:25:39 AM  

nulluspixiusdemonica: fusillade762: How do any of those warrant the use of the word "laser" in the name??

You're new to this whole 'marketing' thing aren't you? If you look closely you'll see plenty of spurious claims.
[www.smbc-comics.com image 468x465]


phrawgh: Should have read the instructions

Pfft.. that requires engaging Brain and Brain's a killjoy who says "visible skin layers are dead and no amount of over-priced moisturizer is going to change this". Better to just slap it on and play pretend.


My favorite was the name brand white vinegar who boasted that their food-grade vinegar was "not made from petroleum products".
 
2013-10-09 03:31:58 AM  

LordOfThePings: Methylisothiaminniacinzolincalzone.

That's bad.



That's no calzone.
This is a calzone:

i527.photobucket.com
 
2013-10-09 03:55:01 AM  

the_celt: FTA -  'When I went into my local chemist I spotted the L'Oreal Revitalift range and decided to give it a try, but it was the biggest mistake I ever made, after the reaction I had.'


Local chemist?  Really?  Why not just use trichloroethylene next time?  Exfoliates perfectly.


"Chemist" is British for "pharmacist"
 
2013-10-09 03:57:33 AM  
I learned something new today and

ransack.: the_celt: FTA -  'When I went into my local chemist I spotted the L'Oreal Revitalift range and decided to give it a try, but it was the biggest mistake I ever made, after the reaction I had.'


Local chemist?  Really?  Why not just use trichloroethylene next time?  Exfoliates perfectly.

"Chemist" is British for "pharmacist"



Good to know.  Thanks
 I learned something new today and the day is just now 3 hours old here.  Awesome
 
2013-10-09 04:04:49 AM  

doglover: Some people have allergies. News at 11.


Some preservatives really are more irritating than others. This is one of them. The FDA has rules in the US that it's not allowed in leave-on products, so you'll see it in shampoos sometimes, but it shouldn't appear in a product intended to be left on the skin. Most people would have some irritant response to this product, but the response would vary. And in some people an irritant response doesn't make itself known with visible symptoms even if it's causing sub-dermal irritation or skin death. For example, when you're in the sun, you don't feel skin damage, even though your skin is being damaged (I'm not saying people shouldn't go in the sun, but the skin is damaged in the sunlight).

According to  http://www.paulaschoice.com/cosmetic-ingredient-dictionary/definition / preservatives/methylchloroisothiazolinone :

"In combination with methylisothiazolinone, it goes by the trade name Kathon CG (among others). Introduced into cosmetics in the mid-1970s, it elicited a great number of sensitizations in consumers. This led to it not being included in cosmetics other than rinse-off products (Sources: Contact Dermatitis, November 2001, pages 257-264; and European Journal of Dermatology, March 1999, pages 144-160).

Methylchloroisothiazolinone, when combined with methylisothiazolinone, offers broad-spectrum activity against microorganisms. This blend is being used in many products instead of parabens, despite the fact that parabens have a better safety track record and lower incidence of causing a sensitized reaction. Along with methylisothiazolinone, this preservative has maintained its reputation as a frequent allergen in leave-on products, particularly hair care and feminine hygiene (Source:  Contact Dermatitis, November 2011, pages 276-285)."
 
2013-10-09 04:24:40 AM  

fusillade762: [i.dailymail.co.uk image 634x398]

How do any of those warrant the use of the word "laser" in the name??


The advertising campaign in the UK - which was everywhere for a while - was something to do with 90+% of users who were intending to get laser resurfacing said "Bugger it, this is fine instead" after using the creams a few months. A little obscure, but not quite as outrageous as some.


Given this woman's age, she's clearly done little more than rub soap on her face for her lifetime, given none of the ingredients in this cream are particularly obscure and are found in thousands of things.
 
2013-10-09 04:46:52 AM  

ransack.: Penicillin for an allergic reaction? Huh?


Steroids shut down an important mechanism of the immune system (inflammation). Antibiotics must be given to combat that side-effect of steroids.
 
2013-10-09 05:36:36 AM  

Rosyna: ransack.: Penicillin for an allergic reaction? Huh?

Steroids shut down an important mechanism of the immune system (inflammation). Antibiotics must be given to combat that side-effect of steroids.


Ahh that makes sense. Thanks for clearing that up.
 
2013-10-09 05:39:48 AM  

fusillade762: [i.dailymail.co.uk image 634x398]

How do any of those warrant the use of the word "laser" in the name??



Now she laser down to sleep
Prays L'Oreal her skin to keep
If she should die before she wakes
There'll be a lawsuit
 
GBB
2013-10-09 06:25:46 AM  

fusillade762: [i.dailymail.co.uk image 634x398]

How do any of those warrant the use of the word "laser" in the name??


Like Laser Cut Keys?
www.joshslockandkey.com
That's not a laser!  That's "milling".
 
2013-10-09 06:41:24 AM  

fusillade762: [i.dailymail.co.uk image 634x398]

How do any of those warrant the use of the word "laser" in the name??


Whadday you mean?! Didn't you see that lady's face - it' s "laser red"!
 
2013-10-09 07:02:17 AM  
There's something in higher end shampoos that give a rash, but the Nobel Prize winning chemists at the haircut places argue "but it's hypoallergenic, it can't cause a rash" while desperately trying to upsell me some fancy goop.
 
2013-10-09 07:03:23 AM  
OMG DON'T EVER DO THAT!
Oh, I thought you were talking about the farking autoplay video.

Big deal, there's a woman with an allergy.
 
2013-10-09 07:22:57 AM  
L'Oreal still test cosmetics on animals, the farkers
 
2013-10-09 07:25:50 AM  

gunsmack: Guess that whole "aging gracefully" thing is looking better by the minute.

/ jk, she's probably mainlining Oil of Olay


Looking at the forehead as opposed to around the mouth, she's shooting up quite a bit of botox. I'm surprised she can blink.
 
2013-10-09 07:33:00 AM  

Quantum Apostrophe: doglover: Some people have allergies. News at 11.

Doglover didn't read the article and isn't interested in reality. As usual.


Did you read the article?
 
2013-10-09 08:28:07 AM  

phrawgh: Should have read the instructions: "...first test clean a small inconspicuous area and then proceed with application if no damage occurred in the test area."


^This. Of course, anyone who thinks that anti-aging products really work deserve what they get.
 
2013-10-09 08:28:38 AM  
Hey, vain beyotches with too much money. You are supposed TEST new products on a small patch of skin in an inconspicuous area when trying out new face splooge. Not slather it all over your face. All sorts of weird nasty sh*t in that stuff.

Better plan though... don't bake your face in the sun, don't smoke a carton of camels a week, don't sleep in your make up (in fact avoid makeup as much as possible and/or buy stuff that isn't crammed with chemicals), eat plenty of fruits/veggies and drink plenty of water.

If you must rub something into your face buy PURE aloe gel and PURE vitamin E oil. When you get out of the shower apply the aloe then apply the vitamin E to seal it in. If you don't like the way it feels just let it soak in for a while then wash of the excess.

Strangely enough I spent some time selling super high end/ultra expensive cosmetics. It is all sketchy ass garbage made from whale penises and donkey hemorrhoids stirred up in some cold cream.
 
2013-10-09 08:34:02 AM  

Lady J: L'Oreal still test cosmetics on animals, the farkers


assets.dogtime.com
... Looks quite... fetching.
 
2013-10-09 08:37:35 AM  

bborchar: phrawgh: Should have read the instructions: "...first test clean a small inconspicuous area and then proceed with application if no damage occurred in the test area."

^This. Of course, anyone who thinks that anti-aging products really work deserve what they get.


Ummm, of course many of them work. Retinoids reduce wrinkles and smooth the skin. Fact.   Hyaluronic acid makes the skin firmer and more youthful. Fact. There are 3 or 4 other things that have been extensively tested (such as matrixyl and other peptide combinations) that unequivocally "work".  These are exactly the things found in medium-high end skin creams.

They're all far more effective as preventative treatments rather than corrective treatments (ie start young), but there's no argument whether or not they "work".
 
2013-10-09 08:41:15 AM  
The good news is you get like 4 paid months off in England if you so much as sneeze, so I'm sure she had plenty of time to recover.
 
2013-10-09 08:47:04 AM  

Bungles: Ummm, of course many of them work.


You want to do some research on the doses.. Nothing on shelf is anywhere near the effective dose because of the side effects. Which means if it's in the ingredient list, its a marketing tool, nothing more.

*Fact* I pulled out of some orifice...
 
2013-10-09 08:57:55 AM  
Well, it worked. I'm sure her face swelled up pretty good. She looked ten years younger but ten years fatter.
 
2013-10-09 09:00:56 AM  

fusillade762: How do any of those warrant the use of the word "laser" in the name??


Wasn't that a fad from the 80s or 90s? An endless stream of products that somehow incorporated the word "laser" into them I think.

And lasers are all techy and cool and make some people associate the product with precision or some bs like that.
 
2013-10-09 09:06:52 AM  

nulluspixiusdemonica: Bungles: Ummm, of course many of them work.

You want to do some research on the doses.. Nothing on shelf is anywhere near the effective dose because of the side effects. Which means if it's in the ingredient list, its a marketing tool, nothing more.

*Fact* I pulled out of some orifice...



What specifically are you referring to, because it's simply not true.  There are dozens of off-the-shelf products that contain modern retinoid versions that are perfectly potent enough to treat most people in the medium and long term. It's not the 90s where these things are only available by prescription (I'm talking about Europe... perhaps the US has laws making their on-the-shelf skincare radically out-of-whack with the rest of the world?).

Are you saying 0.1% retinaldehyde treatments are not "strong" enough? Or 1% retinol? Or retinyl palmitate solutions? Or 0.3% adapalene gels? They're all retinoid forms in strengths available in mainstream off-the-shelf products, and all considerably beyond the concentrations shown to have significant clinical efficacy in clinical trial after clinical trial.

Same with hyaluronic acid: since that was approved for cosmetic purposes, there's never been any sort of "dosage" issue of prescription vs counter preparations, because it's not a concentration based irritant in anywhere near the levels used dermatologically.


Of course the cosmetics and dermatology industry is slathered with absurd marketing hype: that doesn't mean that there are certain things that are unequivocally effective.
 
2013-10-09 09:06:55 AM  
She looked fine in the 'before' pictures.
 
2013-10-09 09:41:52 AM  
Bungles:What specifically are you referring to, because it's simply not true.

If it's not stripping away the epidermis, it's BS.

The FDA generally doesn't encourage astringent acid bathes which dissolve skin.

Thus, the skincare industry is BS.

It's marketing saturated, pseudo-scientific BS plugging magic potions to desperate marks, but BS nonetheless.
 
2013-10-09 09:50:40 AM  

nulluspixiusdemonica: Bungles:What specifically are you referring to, because it's simply not true.

If it's not stripping away the epidermis, it's BS.

The FDA generally doesn't encourage astringent acid bathes which dissolve skin.

Thus, the skincare industry is BS.

It's marketing saturated, pseudo-scientific BS plugging magic potions to desperate marks, but BS nonetheless.


Increasing the rate the epidermis strips is exactly what glycolic acid and other AHAs do (which are all on-the-shelf concoctions), but to say that's the end-all of skincare is a little potty. Most modern "anti-aging" skincare is about slowing the rate of natural collagen degeneration (which has absolutely nothing to do with the epidermis) maintaining facial muscle tone (nothing to do with the epidermis) and increasing the rate of cell turn-over in the dermis (nothing to do with the epidermis).
 
2013-10-09 09:56:23 AM  

ransack.: Penicillin for an allergic reaction? Huh?


My thoughts exactly! That's a farking retarded doctor to prescribe penicillin for an allergy....maybe Benydryl or another type of anti-histamine, but an antibiotic doesn't make sense...
 
2013-10-09 09:57:57 AM  

Phineas: The good news is you get like 4 paid months off in England if you so much as sneeze, so I'm sure she had plenty of time to recover.


I'll take bs things ill informed people say for 500 please Alex
 
2013-10-09 10:11:08 AM  
protip: does not cure ugliness, no matter how much you use
 
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