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(BBC)   The Pentagon unveils a new robot that won't fall over no matter how hard you shove it. That's right, the Army has spent millions of dollars to create a battle-weeble   (m.bbc.co.uk) divider line 40
    More: Cool, Boston Dynamics, University of Sheffield, manufacturing cost, DARPA, robots, humanoid robot  
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2876 clicks; posted to Geek » on 09 Oct 2013 at 3:38 AM (50 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



40 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2013-10-08 11:48:40 PM
There's no way this won't end badly.
 
2013-10-08 11:56:18 PM
This is a big reason why the economy is in the mess it's in. You see, when you build furniture, grow food, or produce any of the other millions of goods and services that people consume, you are adding to the economy (assuming the cost of production is below the market value). This is just money down the toilet, and the taxpayer has to lower his standard of living to pay for it.
 
2013-10-09 12:01:26 AM

ElLoco: There's no way this won't end badly.


i53.photobucket.com
 
2013-10-09 01:12:46 AM
Everyone should watch the video of the galloping quadraped robot, and then imagine it chasing you down, clamping onto you and then coldly administering an injection into your eyeball.
 
2013-10-09 01:39:46 AM

DrPainMD: This is a big reason why the economy is in the mess it's in. You see, when you build furniture, grow food, or produce any of the other millions of goods and services that people consume, you are adding to the economy (assuming the cost of production is below the market value). This is just money down the toilet, and the taxpayer has to lower his standard of living to pay for it.


What makes you think people won't end up consuming the end product? Did you say the same thing about UAVs when they were being developed? Do you think all basic research is just "money down the toilet"?
 
2013-10-09 02:37:41 AM
Oh, and on that note. Most of the things you take for granted today, where developed in the sixties by NASA.

I guess they forgot to teach history in JUNIOR FUKING HIGH SCHOOL!!!
 
2013-10-09 03:42:33 AM

DrPainMD: This is a big reason why the economy is in the mess it's in. You see, when you build furniture, grow food, or produce any of the other millions of goods and services that people consume, you are adding to the economy (assuming the cost of production is below the market value). This is just money down the toilet, and the taxpayer has to lower his standard of living to pay for it.


Says the guy posting on DARPAnet
 
2013-10-09 03:42:35 AM
Well, that thing's legitimately terrifying. On the other hand, that better mean we're getting a portal gun too..
 
2013-10-09 03:53:15 AM
Call me when the quadruped robots can join together to form an even larger robot.
 
2013-10-09 04:00:02 AM
I can see Atlas being useful in search and rescue or situations like the Fukushima meltdown, but the Wildcat is just farking terrifying.
 
2013-10-09 04:25:50 AM
First of all, the mental image of a weaponized Weeble is nightmare-inducing. Second, that thing walks like motherfarking C3PO.
 
2013-10-09 06:38:37 AM

Somaticasual: Well, that thing's legitimately terrifying. On the other hand, that better mean we're getting a portal gun too..


Dead on with what I was thinking, little bugger even looks like the 'bot they built somewhat...
 
2013-10-09 07:14:58 AM
i603.photobucket.com
 
2013-10-09 07:16:21 AM
FTFA: "We do not know what military purpose it will serve but certainly it is a step towards a high-speed ground robot that could be weaponised to hunt and kill."Jeeeesus Christ.
 
2013-10-09 07:29:22 AM
LoL, Wild Cat picture needs a "haters going to hate" caption
 
2013-10-09 07:35:39 AM
How well does it stand up with a couple rounds in its chest?
 
2013-10-09 07:58:12 AM
No matter how hard?
wakpaper.com
/they sure about that?
 
2013-10-09 07:58:46 AM
Just give it some pie and things will be OK.
 
2013-10-09 08:18:34 AM

Somaticasual: Well, that thing's legitimately terrifying. On the other hand, that better mean we're getting a portal gun too..


Not really, no. Any technology like this is instantly destroyed with a few household chemicals in the right proportion.
 
2013-10-09 08:20:53 AM

thatboyoverthere: DrPainMD: This is a big reason why the economy is in the mess it's in. You see, when you build furniture, grow food, or produce any of the other millions of goods and services that people consume, you are adding to the economy (assuming the cost of production is below the market value). This is just money down the toilet, and the taxpayer has to lower his standard of living to pay for it.

Says the guy posting on DARPAnet


Good thing that the government didn't beat the Wright brothers to inventing the airplane (the gov't spent $50,000 and failed, while the Wright brothers spent $1200 and succeeded) or you'd be saying that we wouldn't have flight without the government.

If you think that that's my subtle way of calling you an idiot, you would be correct. You're also someone who has absolutely no knowledge of the history of private sector network R&D. We would absolutely have an internet today even if the government never spent a penny on it.
 
2013-10-09 08:26:27 AM

spcMike: Call me when the quadruped robots can join together to form an even larger robot.


It's not to hard to imagine swarm programming being applied to these. Is "assembly" that far off?

Swarm
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YQIMGV5vtd4
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kk40ZnuzNNw

Assemble
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6aZbJS6LZbs
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uIn-sMq8-Ls
 
2013-10-09 08:34:04 AM
well sure, it's got all those cables holding it up.
 
2013-10-09 08:56:30 AM

Norad: Somaticasual: Well, that thing's legitimately terrifying. On the other hand, that better mean we're getting a portal gun too..

Not really, no. Any technology like this is instantly destroyed with a few household chemicals in the right proportion.


Who taught you that recipe, your mom?
 
2013-10-09 08:58:33 AM

Cagey B: Everyone should watch the video of the galloping quadraped robot, and then imagine it chasing you down, clamping onto you and then coldly administering an injection into your eyeball.


Imagine a herd of them coming over the crest of a hill.

With syringes at the ready, of course.
 
2013-10-09 09:10:59 AM
Okay so we have the Bipedal soldier-bot,but really we've nothing to fear until they get to the Second Variety
 
2013-10-09 09:31:44 AM

Magorn: Okay so we have the Bipedal soldier-bot,but really we've nothing to fear until they get to the Second Variety


the russians just built it, fark thread this week.
 
2013-10-09 09:33:14 AM
The question is: does it push back? Also, will it protect us from the terrible secret of space?
 
2013-10-09 09:53:34 AM

DrPainMD: If you think that that's my subtle way of calling you an idiot, you would be correct.


wat
 
2013-10-09 09:56:44 AM

DrPainMD: Good thing that the government didn't beat the Wright brothers to inventing the airplane (the gov't spent $50,000 and failed, while the Wright brothers spent $1200 and succeeded) or you'd be saying that we wouldn't have flight without the government.

If you think that that's my subtle way of calling you an idiot, you would be correct. You're also someone who has absolutely no knowledge of the history of private sector network R&D. We would absolutely have an internet today even if the government never spent a penny on it.



And aviation thrived in the decades following due to government interest in developing and improving aircraft.  You're conveniently ignoring the fact that the Wright Brothers, like the other earlier aircraft builders, relied upon government contracts for their continued operation.  The civil aviation market was minuscule and was unable to sustain and support the aviation industry absent government participation.

So if you think that's my subtle way of calling you a tool, you would be correct.
 
2013-10-09 09:59:24 AM

Strik3r: spcMike: Call me when the quadruped robots can join together to form an even larger robot.

It's not to hard to imagine swarm programming being applied to these. Is "assembly" that far off?

Swarm
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YQIMGV5vtd4
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kk40ZnuzNNw

Assemble
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6aZbJS6LZbs
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uIn-sMq8-Ls


Hear that? Its the sound of birdshot prices going up.

All paranoia aside, thats really farking cool!
 
2013-10-09 10:00:34 AM
 
2013-10-09 10:01:26 AM
www.entertainmentearth.com
 
2013-10-09 10:17:58 AM
(Australian accent)

That's not an Atlas.

news.bbcimg.co.uk

THAT'S an Atlas.

image.gamespotcdn.net
 
2013-10-09 10:26:58 AM
theawesomer.com
 
2013-10-09 10:48:07 AM

abhorrent1: No matter how hard?
[wakpaper.com image 419x335]
/they sure about that?


Yup

media.moddb.com
 
2013-10-09 11:09:07 AM
DrPainMD:

Good thing that the government didn't beat the Wright brothers to inventing the airplane (the gov't spent $50,000 and failed, while the Wright brothers spent $1200 and succeeded) or you'd be saying that we wouldn't have flight without the government.

If you think that that's my subtle way of calling you an idiot, you would be correct. You're also someone who has absolutely no knowledge of the history of private sector network R&D. We would absolutely have an internet today even if the government never spent a penny on it.


Low hanging fruit.  I doubt a government invented the wheel, lever, or gunpowder as well.  Although I sure it can be argued at the time the inventors were working and funded in behalf of some form of political authority, since it predated modern capitalism and democracy.

Problem today is you need vast networks of individuals and knowledge bases, on top of the modern economic and political culture to support research, engineering, and innovation.

There are no true self made men anymore, just as there is no frontier on the surface of this planet.  We're past the point where individuals have no debt to the society created around them that supports their work in a trillion ways small and large and mostly overlooked.

The Waltons have done a lot to improve logistics, but they would have never made their billions if states and the feds didn't provide the infrastructure over which they ship their goods to market.  Increasingly they're also rolling over profits that are made due to relying on welfare and other social services to fill the gap as a form of income / government subsidy (which should be illegal, but you know how lobbyists work)
 
2013-10-09 11:10:07 AM

DrPainMD: This is a big reason why the economy is in the mess it's in. You see, when you build furniture, grow food, or produce any of the other millions of goods and services that people consume, you are adding to the economy (assuming the cost of production is below the market value). This is just money down the toilet, and the taxpayer has to lower his standard of living to pay for it.


As a supposed medical doctor:
Where is most of the research for new drugs (the BASE level research) done these days? How profitable is it?
 
2013-10-09 08:31:50 PM
"Battle-Weeble" is the best name ever!
 
2013-10-09 11:05:08 PM

Parthenogenetic: (Australian accent)

That's not an Atlas.

[news.bbcimg.co.uk image 640x360]

THAT'S an Atlas.

[image.gamespotcdn.net image 640x477]


static.mwomercs.com
 
2013-10-10 12:40:35 AM
"The mechanical Hound slept but did not sleep, lived but did not live in its gently humming, gently vibrating, softly illuminated kennel back in a dark corner of the fire house. The dim light of one in the morning, the moonlight from the open sky framed through the great window, touched here and there on the brass and copper and the steel of the faintly trembling beast. Light flickered on bits of ruby glass and on sensitive capillary hairs in the nylon-brushed nostrils of the creature that quivered gently, its eight legs spidered under it on rubber padded paws.

Nights when things got dull, which was every night, the men slid down the brass poles, and set the ticking combinations of the olfactory system of the hound and let loose rats in the fire house areaway. Three seconds later the game was done, the rat caught half across the areaway, gripped in gentle paws while a four-inch hollow steel needle plunged down from the proboscis of the hound to inject massive jolts of morphine or procaine."
               -- Ray Bradbury, "Fahrenheit 451"
 
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