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(io9)   List of ancient archeological sites destroyed by stupid humans   (io9.com) divider line 38
    More: Stupid, umm, Heinrich Schliemann, Iraq War, Afghanistan, Iraq, Alfred Nobel, Atacama Desert, antiquities  
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3805 clicks; posted to Geek » on 09 Oct 2013 at 3:50 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-10-09 01:03:24 AM  
1) A functional U.S. government
 
2013-10-09 01:34:36 AM  
One of Belize's largest Mayan pyramids, a 100 feet tall (30 m) from the 3th century BC

So sad that something from as long ago as the thirth century would be destroyed.
 
2013-10-09 03:24:55 AM  
Yeah, um, most of these things are serious modern events. A few more ancient events are much more notable.

A library comes to mind.
 
2013-10-09 04:00:25 AM  
They could have included the countless mounds plowed over in America's heartland. Even the large sites such as Momk's Mound lost parts of it to the plow.
 
2013-10-09 04:11:27 AM  
All of the ancient new world Mormon archeological sites have been systematically destroyed.  The conspirators have made sure there isn't a single remnant of any of the organizations or a single conflict era horse bone from the immense battles to be found.
 
2013-10-09 04:17:31 AM  
The Buddhas of Afghanistan and the Temples of Nebuchadnezzar in Babylon are the two destructions I am most saddened by. Destruction in the name of religion and destruction in the name of anti-religion. It's all destruction in the end.

There's something sadly poetic about the destruction of the tombs in Nanjing to build an Ikea.
 
2013-10-09 04:23:24 AM  

Mid_mo_mad_man: They could have included the countless mounds plowed over in America's heartland. Even the large sites such as Momk's Mound lost parts of it to the plow.


Spiro Mounds came to mind ... some Oklahoma farmers knew it was a big Indian burial ground, so they used dynamite and sold whatever they could easily dig up. A lot of artifacts were lost to the blasts or carelessness.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spiro_Mounds

/learned about it from a 40-year-old copy of a National Geographic that was left in my bathroom. Talk about an artifact.
//Who knows? In a thousand years, even you may be worth something
 
2013-10-09 04:48:47 AM  
There's plenty of more modern archaeological and historical treasures that are being destroyed out of stupidity, hubris, or religious jealousy.

This article only focused on the reeaaallly old ones.
 
2013-10-09 05:04:41 AM  
That was depressing.
 
2013-10-09 05:04:55 AM  
I don't like lists like this, makes me sad.
 
2013-10-09 05:31:39 AM  
Most of those weren't people being stupid or careless, it was people caring more about present-day concerns than the preservation of the past.

Which  sounds all evil in a Disney kind of way, but is in reality a perfectly valid viewpoint.  The past doesn't have infinite value, it has a finite value that needs to be balanced against current needs.  The peasants in the British isles that disassembled most of the old castles to build agricultural walls weren't going to be able to keep their sheep in their fields through the magical power of history.

I mean, I'd argue with the specific judgments of value made in some of the specific cases in TFA, but the author's apparently taking the position that anything old decaying beyond recovery is a tragedy.  It's not, it's just life.
 
2013-10-09 05:38:55 AM  
Another one not on the list but should be:
http://archive.archaeology.org/0003/newsbriefs/flap.html

Not likely to be on any of these kinds of lists because of "political" fears.
 
2013-10-09 05:45:13 AM  

Jim_Callahan: Most of those weren't people being stupid or careless, it was people caring more about present-day concerns than the preservation of the past.

Which  sounds all evil in a Disney kind of way, but is in reality a perfectly valid viewpoint.  The past doesn't have infinite value, it has a finite value that needs to be balanced against current needs.  The peasants in the British isles that disassembled most of the old castles to build agricultural walls weren't going to be able to keep their sheep in their fields through the magical power of history.

I mean, I'd argue with the specific judgments of value made in some of the specific cases in TFA, but the author's apparently taking the position that anything old decaying beyond recovery is a tragedy.  It's not, it's just life.


What are you talking about?  Do you mean that people come first?  What are you, some kind of nutty Ayn Rand fan?

/you're not nuts
//these are sad examples but you're right
///private property rights rule
////religion of peas
 
2013-10-09 06:22:06 AM  
This makes me sad. Also there are things like the Aswan and Three Gorges dams that obliterated countless archaeological treasures - although at least is the case of Aswan a number of the more important sites like Abu Simbel were relocated before the lake was filled.

I live in a very young country. Humans only settled in New Zealand around 800-1000 years ago and their buildings were made of wood and reeds, so we have no grand ancient monuments. Our archaeologists look at things like middens and tailings from a gold rush in the 1860s and building sites. All valid areas of study, but they have none of the impact that great ancient monuments carry. I'm envious of the people who have thousands of years of history around them. And I'm angered by those who have such a cavalier disregard for the treasures in their midsts.
 
2013-10-09 07:02:33 AM  
i.imgur.com

"That was 90% gravity."
 
2013-10-09 07:37:56 AM  
farm4.staticflickr.com
 
2013-10-09 07:48:32 AM  
These are just things, Goshevan.  And things can be replaced. Lives cannot.

upload.wikimedia.org
 
2013-10-09 07:56:15 AM  
Missing from the list: Mayan ruins of San Gervasio on Cozumel. Destroyed by a landowner using dynamite to  loot them and use their stones to build his fancy house.
 
2013-10-09 08:15:06 AM  
bruceleeeowe.files.wordpress.com

Soon to be added to the list.
 
2013-10-09 09:06:52 AM  

Jim_Callahan: Most of those weren't people being stupid or careless, it was people caring more about present-day concerns than the preservation of the past.

Which  sounds all evil in a Disney kind of way, but is in reality a perfectly valid viewpoint.  The past doesn't have infinite value, it has a finite value that needs to be balanced against current needs.  The peasants in the British isles that disassembled most of the old castles to build agricultural walls weren't going to be able to keep their sheep in their fields through the magical power of history.

I mean, I'd argue with the specific judgments of value made in some of the specific cases in TFA, but the author's apparently taking the position that anything old decaying beyond recovery is a tragedy.  It's not, it's just life.


I'd argue that history has an indefinite value. You don't know what lessons you will learn from something if it doesn't exist any longer. The Library of Alexandria being a prime example. All we know is that it was full of knowledge, but we have no idea what knowledge.

We do know that ancient people's had techniques to do things that we still haven't solved and rather than some crazy guy screaming 'aliens!' all day, maybe he could just read a book and understand how things worked back then.

I don't know. If someone gave me the choice of living my life, or dying and having the world rediscover the library, I would think long and hard about that decision.
 
2013-10-09 09:28:57 AM  

AverageAmericanGuy: There's something sadly poetic about the destruction of the tombs in Nanjing to build an Ikea.


Our descendants will look at that Ikea as a holy site one day.
 
2013-10-09 09:36:07 AM  
I blame
www.gamersbin.com

Because once you've gotten 3 relics, blowing up the tomb is mandatory.
 
2013-10-09 09:41:50 AM  
The Parthenon being used by the Ottomans to store ammunition doesn't rate the list? It didn't always have a big hole in it and no roof.
 
2013-10-09 09:43:13 AM  
No mention of Wal-mart's history of destroying ancient aboriginal sites?

http://io9.com/ancient-archeological-sites-that-were-destroyed-by-ca re -1442434226
 
2013-10-09 09:43:53 AM  
I live about a mile from where Joseph E Johnston's Confederate army was camped outside Hillsborough, NC,during the surrender negotiations with Gen. Sherman. When I was a kid we used to ride our bikes on the old dirt road into town and pass by rifle pits and other earthworks built to guard the camp and rail line. There's plenty of mention in unit diaries of a cemetery in the vicinity for the wounded who died during the retreat from the battle at Bentonville.

When we found out that the area was going to be developed, several people tried to get the state to investigate and at least find and preserve the cemetery. No dice. A few private individuals did walk the site with metal detectors and found buttons and such, but the cemetery now rests under a WalMart and a mass of crackerbox condos. We did manage to get the old farm house, Johnston's HQ, moved and preserved. The site of the house is now a car wash.

I realize that, as a site, it wasn't very historic - just another camp. But the cemetery should have at least been preserved.
 
2013-10-09 09:44:01 AM  
The Library of Alexandria is often brought up for all that lost knowledge, however it was at least partially destroyed several times over and at least a few people believe that copies of the vast majority of its written works were spread between many locations before the library itself was completely destroyed. Many structures in Egypt were at least partially destroyed by people in the region taking stone works and art to use for their own houses over time. In the U.S., we now know that many of the Indian mounds in the center of the country were destroyed by farmers who had no knowledge that they were anything but hills. Things will always get created and destroyed/re-used. That's just the way the world works. We save the useful or particularly outstanding to what extent we can, but the rest is just old, with less meaning. I don't find that particularly sad because I know the world changes and similarly nothing man-made stays around for too long without change as well.
 
2013-10-09 09:50:11 AM  
upload.wikimedia.org
 
2013-10-09 09:51:59 AM  

pkellmey: The Library of Alexandria is often brought up for all that lost knowledge, however it was at least partially destroyed several times over and at least a few people believe that copies of the vast majority of its written works were spread between many locations before the library itself was completely destroyed. Many structures in Egypt were at least partially destroyed by people in the region taking stone works and art to use for their own houses over time. In the U.S., we now know that many of the Indian mounds in the center of the country were destroyed by farmers who had no knowledge that they were anything but hills. Things will always get created and destroyed/re-used. That's just the way the world works. We save the useful or particularly outstanding to what extent we can, but the rest is just old, with less meaning. I don't find that particularly sad because I know the world changes and similarly nothing man-made stays around for too long without change as well.


wac.450f.edgecastcdn.net
 
2013-10-09 10:52:52 AM  

StoPPeRmobile: pkellmey: The Library of Alexandria is often brought up for all that lost knowledge, however it was at least partially destroyed several times over and at least a few people believe that copies of the vast majority of its written works were spread between many locations before the library itself was completely destroyed. Many structures in Egypt were at least partially destroyed by people in the region taking stone works and art to use for their own houses over time. In the U.S., we now know that many of the Indian mounds in the center of the country were destroyed by farmers who had no knowledge that they were anything but hills. Things will always get created and destroyed/re-used. That's just the way the world works. We save the useful or particularly outstanding to what extent we can, but the rest is just old, with less meaning. I don't find that particularly sad because I know the world changes and similarly nothing man-made stays around for too long without change as well.

[wac.450f.edgecastcdn.net image 625x417]


What does the Pykon bridge or the Wishstones have to do with the Library of Alexandria?
 
2013-10-09 11:08:28 AM  
Nothing lasts forever guys.  Get over it.
 
2013-10-09 11:14:05 AM  
When we were vacationing in Greece a few years ago, we took a short drive out to the ancient ruins of Nemea. This is a place that's been around for thousands of years, and celebrated in folklore/mythology as the home of Eurydice and the Nemean Lion killed by Heracles/Hercules.

There's a small booth at the entrance to the site, and the sign said to pay the guy at the gate...but he was nowhere to be found. So whatever, we went on in, driving past garbage cans that hadn't been emptied in weeks. And we were almost entirely alone, roaming among the ancient walls and columns. And there, sitting on a fallen column segment and smoking a cigarette, was a guy with some sort of official badge/insignia. Probably the guy who we were supposed to pay, but he didn't care and neither did we.

When he finished his cigarette, he crushed it out on the fallen pillar he was sitting on, leaving a mark.
 
2013-10-09 12:34:12 PM  
What's the big deal about destroying a list? Just write another one.
 
2013-10-09 01:17:28 PM  
i0.kym-cdn.com
 
2013-10-09 02:24:00 PM  
This is why if you own a building you should knock it down and build something new every 30 years, because after 30 years some asshole "preservationist" will want to "preserve" a useless POS building because it is "historical". Fark that shiat knock it down and build something new.
 
2013-10-09 03:36:27 PM  
Remember the Cubby-Burger on third and main when we were growing up? Yeah. And then they tore it down and built a Burger King in it's place.
/facebook
 
2013-10-09 08:42:06 PM  
Humans not responsible for this one because: 1. we didn't make it and 2. we didn't knock it down
upload.wikimedia.org
 
2013-10-10 05:52:40 AM  

FuturePastNow: The Parthenon being used by the Ottomans to store ammunition doesn't rate the list? It didn't always have a big hole in it and no roof.


The Ottomans were storing their powder in it because it was a church/mosque and they figured it was safe.

But it was the Venetians who decided to shell it and then pull down the pediment sculptures.
 
2013-10-10 11:34:29 AM  

buntz: These are just things, Goshevan.  And things can be replaced. Lives cannot.

[upload.wikimedia.org image 250x305]


SOONG: Why does a painter paint? Why does a boxer box? You know what Michelangelo used to say? That the sculptures he made were already there before he started, hidden in the marble. All he needed to do was remove the unneeded bits. It wasn't quite that easy with you, Data. But the need to do it, my need to do it, was no different than Michelangelo's need. Now let me ask you a question. Why are humans so fascinated by old things?

DATA: Old things?

SOONG: Old buildings, churches, walls, ancient things, antique things, tables, clocks, knick knacks. Why? Why, why?

DATA: There are many possible explanations.

SOONG: If you brought a Noophian to Earth, he'd probably look around and say, tear that old village down, it's hanging in rags. Build me something new, something efficient! But to a human, that old house, that ancient wall, it's a shrine, something to be cherished. Again, I ask you, why?

DATA: Perhaps, for humans, old things represent a tie to the past.

SOONG: What's so important about the past? People got sick, they needed money. Why tie yourself to that?

DATA: Humans are mortal. They seem to need a sense of continuity.

SOONG: Ah hah!! Why?

DATA: To give their lives meaning. A sense of purpose.

SOONG: And this continuity, does it only run one way, backwards, to the past?

DATA: I suppose it is a factor in the human desire to procreate.

SOONG: So you believe that having children gives humans a sense of immortality, do you?

DATA: It is a reasonable explanation to your query, sir.

SOONG: And to yours as well, Data.
 
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