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(Sportige)   The weird career trajectory of Matt Flynn finally almost comes to a full circle, being considered as a candidate to be a backup for Aaron Rodgers   (sportige.com) divider line 30
    More: Ironic, Aaron Rodgers, Joe Philbin, Raiders, flights, Terrelle Pryor, garbage time, Redskins, Ryan Tannehill  
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1241 clicks; posted to Sports » on 08 Oct 2013 at 9:30 AM (45 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



30 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-10-08 09:09:14 AM
Not according to the Packers coach he isn't.
 
2013-10-08 09:38:21 AM
Wouldn't be surprised if Houston came calling. Schaub can't keep throwing inverse touchdowns and hold on to that job.
 
2013-10-08 09:42:14 AM
Browns maybe? Wouldn't mind Flynn if we could get him back for cheap, pretty sure MCParthey doesn't want Flynn though.
 
2013-10-08 09:48:22 AM
I wonder how long it'll take for him to have been on / cut from all 32 rosters
 
2013-10-08 09:57:29 AM
So, since he was waived does he lose his contract money?
Since he's been in the league more than three years is this season's salary guaranteed?
How much has this guy been paid in his career for what amounts to one awesome game?
 
2013-10-08 09:58:45 AM

Klivian: Wouldn't be surprised if Houston came calling. Schaub can't keep throwing inverse touchdowns and hold on to that job.


They've already got a backup on the roster who's starting material - and he has as many playoff wins as Tim Tebow.
 
2013-10-08 10:00:24 AM
Flynn started TWO games for GB and they were gems, so why did everyone assume he was the next Joe Montana?
 
2013-10-08 10:02:28 AM

natural316: Flynn started TWO games for GB and they were gems, so why did everyone assume he was the next Joe Montana?


I never heard anyone say anything close to that.  (And before anyone responds with "but Seattle gave him a gazillion dollars like Matt Cassell and Kevin Kolb!!!"... no, they did not.)
 
2013-10-08 10:10:20 AM

Kygz: So, since he was waived does he lose his contract money?
Since he's been in the league more than three years is this season's salary guaranteed?
How much has this guy been paid in his career for what amounts to one awesome game?


NFL contracts work in the following manner:

Signing bonus is guaranteed, and paid to the player up front. It is detailed out over the contract length for salary cap purposes, but he already has that money in hand.

Yearly salary is more complex. If you have a contract prior to the start of the season, once the season begins, you are guaranteed that money for that season. If you are not on a roster, and sign during the season, it is not guaranteed, and you get just your weekly game check.

If you are cut, but get claimed on waivers, the new team picks up your contract. If you clear waivers, and get signed by a new team, you are making money on your new deal, as well as being paid by the old team.
 
2013-10-08 10:11:00 AM
In other news, it appears Oregon is playing in the Pro Bowl this year...


http://m.espn.go.com/nfl/story?storyId=9790956
 
2013-10-08 10:28:08 AM

Klivian: Kygz: So, since he was waived does he lose his contract money?
Since he's been in the league more than three years is this season's salary guaranteed?
How much has this guy been paid in his career for what amounts to one awesome game?

NFL contracts work in the following manner:

Signing bonus is guaranteed, and paid to the player up front. It is detailed out over the contract length for salary cap purposes, but he already has that money in hand.

Yearly salary is more complex. If you have a contract prior to the start of the season, once the season begins, you are guaranteed that money for that season. If you are not on a roster, and sign during the season, it is not guaranteed, and you get just your weekly game check.

If you are cut, but get claimed on waivers, the new team picks up your contract. If you clear waivers, and get signed by a new team, you are making money on your new deal, as well as being paid by the old team.


Does it work like baseball with players who were waived?

If the Dodgers were to waive Brandon League in the last year of his contract, they would be responsible for paying him the rest of his contract.

If he were to sign with a team for the minimum, the Dodgers would be on the hook for his contract minus what the new teamed signed him for.
 
2013-10-08 10:48:24 AM
I wouldn't be opening an arcade in Green Bay yet.
 
2013-10-08 10:54:41 AM

ladodger34: Klivian: Kygz: So, since he was waived does he lose his contract money?
Since he's been in the league more than three years is this season's salary guaranteed?
How much has this guy been paid in his career for what amounts to one awesome game?

NFL contracts work in the following manner:

Signing bonus is guaranteed, and paid to the player up front. It is detailed out over the contract length for salary cap purposes, but he already has that money in hand.

Yearly salary is more complex. If you have a contract prior to the start of the season, once the season begins, you are guaranteed that money for that season. If you are not on a roster, and sign during the season, it is not guaranteed, and you get just your weekly game check.

If you are cut, but get claimed on waivers, the new team picks up your contract. If you clear waivers, and get signed by a new team, you are making money on your new deal, as well as being paid by the old team.

Does it work like baseball with players who were waived?

If the Dodgers were to waive Brandon League in the last year of his contract, they would be responsible for paying him the rest of his contract.

If he were to sign with a team for the minimum, the Dodgers would be on the hook for his contract minus what the new teamed signed him for.


If you cut them after the season starts, you're paying the full salary, unless you signed them after the season started. A second contract for that player is simply extra money, but given that they were cut during the season, it's unlikely they sign for more than the minimum.
 
2013-10-08 11:17:51 AM

Klivian: If you cut them after the season starts, you're paying the full salary, unless you signed them after the season started. A second contract for that player is simply extra money, but given that they were cut during the season, it's unlikely they sign for more than the minimum.


Yep, assuming he clears waivers and becomes a free agent. Which is why I found it so hilarious when Josh Freeman asked for his release. He was basically asking for a shot at a pay raise. And he got it, so god bless him.
 
2013-10-08 11:25:54 AM

Klivian: NFL contracts work in the following manner:

...

I'm not sure how much of what you said is correct, but it sounds good and looks realistic.

[SMART]
 
2013-10-08 11:32:21 AM
Anyone else getting a 404 page with lorem ipsum placeholder text instead of TFA?

Also, I won't shed too many tears for a "weird career trajectory" that allows someone to make millions of dollars while largely avoiding injury. I'd say he's doing it right.
 
2013-10-08 11:42:55 AM
It's all greeking to me.
 
2013-10-08 11:48:22 AM

skrame: Klivian: NFL contracts work in the following manner: ...

I'm not sure how much of what you said is correct, but it sounds good and looks realistic.

[SMART]


There is an impressive amount of complexity to the NFL salary cap, though some of what I know may be out of date with the new CBA.

Under the old deal, did you know that teams could use bonuses called "Likely to be earned incentives" to roll over cap space for the next season? The trick was to resign guys at the bottom of the roster to exactly the same contract (or even a little more with some of the extra space you're using) but with incentives that would be reasonable for a star player (such as start every game in the current season) which were impossible for the bench player to accomplish. The new cap number would count against the current season, but the team would be given a credit on the cap for the next season, because the player failed to meet the incentive.
 
2013-10-08 11:55:26 AM

Klivian: skrame: Klivian: NFL contracts work in the following manner: ...

I'm not sure how much of what you said is correct, but it sounds good and looks realistic.

[SMART]

There is an impressive amount of complexity to the NFL salary cap, though some of what I know may be out of date with the new CBA.

Under the old deal, did you know that teams could use bonuses called "Likely to be earned incentives" to roll over cap space for the next season? The trick was to resign guys at the bottom of the roster to exactly the same contract (or even a little more with some of the extra space you're using) but with incentives that would be reasonable for a star player (such as start every game in the current season) which were impossible for the bench player to accomplish. The new cap number would count against the current season, but the team would be given a credit on the cap for the next season, because the player failed to meet the incentive.


I can picture the '99 Rams front office meeting: "Let's give this QB we picked up from the Arena League... *snicker*... a $20 million bonus if he's the MVP of the entire league, and another... *chuckle*... $10 million if he's the winning QB in the Super Bowl.  He'll go along with it, he was just bagging groceries last month!"
 
2013-10-08 11:59:10 AM

Super Chronic: Klivian: skrame: Klivian: NFL contracts work in the following manner: ...

I'm not sure how much of what you said is correct, but it sounds good and looks realistic.

[SMART]

There is an impressive amount of complexity to the NFL salary cap, though some of what I know may be out of date with the new CBA.

Under the old deal, did you know that teams could use bonuses called "Likely to be earned incentives" to roll over cap space for the next season? The trick was to resign guys at the bottom of the roster to exactly the same contract (or even a little more with some of the extra space you're using) but with incentives that would be reasonable for a star player (such as start every game in the current season) which were impossible for the bench player to accomplish. The new cap number would count against the current season, but the team would be given a credit on the cap for the next season, because the player failed to meet the incentive.

I can picture the '99 Rams front office meeting: "Let's give this QB we picked up from the Arena League... *snicker*... a $20 million bonus if he's the MVP of the entire league, and another... *chuckle*... $10 million if he's the winning QB in the Super Bowl.  He'll go along with it, he was just bagging groceries last month!"


Being an AFL fan, after they started 4-0, someone where I worked gave me 5 to 1 odds on $20 that the Rams would win the Super Bowl.   Best $100 I've made on a bet.
 
2013-10-08 12:01:21 PM

natural316: Flynn started TWO games for GB and they were gems, so why did everyone assume he was the next Joe Montana


Because at any given time, there are 3-4 truly elite quarterbacks in the league, another 8 quality quarterbacks or so, and about 20 teams desperate to find that next unknown star working as a backup. Somewhere out there is the next Kurt Warner or Tom Brady working as some team's backup, ready for his chance to be a star. Unfortunately, there are only 1 or 2 guys per decade like that, and Flynn probably isn't that guy. Like Matt Cassell, he played on a team with a great staff and some great receivers that vastly elevated his stock. On the right team, he could probably find success, but that's true of a lot of guys: put enough talent around them and they'll look like a star (i.e., Daunte Culpepper).
 
2013-10-08 12:28:14 PM

NewWorldDan: On the right team, he could probably find success, but that's true of a lot of guys: put enough talent around them and they'll look like a star (i.e., Daunte Culpepper).


That's the part that seems weirdly obvious to me: a team can do well with a decent quarterback if the rest of the team is solid, but a franchise quarterback can't make up for a weak O-line, stone-handed receivers, lightweight running game, or swiss-cheese defense.

The franchise quarterback is the guy who can take a good team and make them look unstoppable; that's what Peyton Manning is doing in Denver. Denver was a solid team before they signed Manning--they made the playoffs in 2011. You put Manning a team like the Jaguars, and suddenly he's Dan Marino--a world-class quarterback trying to win games by himself because he doesn't have enough help.
 
2013-10-08 12:49:25 PM
Maybe him a Tebow can start their own league.
 
2013-10-08 12:52:51 PM

Cybernetic: You put Manning a team like the Jaguars, and suddenly he's Dan Marino--a world-class quarterback trying to win games by himself because he doesn't have enough help.


What do you mean Marino had no help. You don't remember those brick-wall defenses and unstoppable running backs Miami had in the 80's and 90's?

Come to think of it, neither do I.
 
2013-10-08 01:11:55 PM

Klivian: Kygz: So, since he was waived does he lose his contract money?
Since he's been in the league more than three years is this season's salary guaranteed?
How much has this guy been paid in his career for what amounts to one awesome game?

NFL contracts work in the following manner:

Signing bonus is guaranteed, and paid to the player up front. It is detailed out over the contract length for salary cap purposes, but he already has that money in hand.

Yearly salary is more complex. If you have a contract prior to the start of the season, once the season begins, you are guaranteed that money for that season. If you are not on a roster, and sign during the season, it is not guaranteed, and you get just your weekly game check.

If you are cut, but get claimed on waivers, the new team picks up your contract. If you clear waivers, and get signed by a new team, you are making money on your new deal, as well as being paid by the old team.


Freeman is getting something like 12 mil this year because of wonky contract rules, right?
 
2013-10-08 01:17:17 PM

Cybernetic: NewWorldDan: On the right team, he could probably find success, but that's true of a lot of guys: put enough talent around them and they'll look like a star (i.e., Daunte Culpepper).

That's the part that seems weirdly obvious to me: a team can do well with a decent quarterback if the rest of the team is solid, but a franchise quarterback can't make up for a weak O-line, stone-handed receivers, lightweight running game, or swiss-cheese defense.

The franchise quarterback is the guy who can take a good team and make them look unstoppable; that's what Peyton Manning is doing in Denver. Denver was a solid team before they signed Manning--they made the playoffs in 2011. You put Manning a team like the Jaguars, and suddenly he's Dan Marino--a world-class quarterback trying to win games by himself because he doesn't have enough help.


Aaron Rodgers' 4th Quarter Comebacks stat is getting a kick out of this comment.
 
2013-10-08 01:33:51 PM

neuroflare: Klivian: Kygz: So, since he was waived does he lose his contract money?
Since he's been in the league more than three years is this season's salary guaranteed?
How much has this guy been paid in his career for what amounts to one awesome game?

NFL contracts work in the following manner:

Signing bonus is guaranteed, and paid to the player up front. It is detailed out over the contract length for salary cap purposes, but he already has that money in hand.

Yearly salary is more complex. If you have a contract prior to the start of the season, once the season begins, you are guaranteed that money for that season. If you are not on a roster, and sign during the season, it is not guaranteed, and you get just your weekly game check.

If you are cut, but get claimed on waivers, the new team picks up your contract. If you clear waivers, and get signed by a new team, you are making money on your new deal, as well as being paid by the old team.

Freeman is getting something like 12 mil this year because of wonky contract rules, right?


Through the guaranteed portion of his contracts, Flynn has made 14.5m over the last 2 years, so things could have gone a lot worse for him.
 
2013-10-08 02:23:08 PM

Cybernetic: Anyone else getting a 404 page with lorem ipsum placeholder text instead of TFA?

Also, I won't shed too many tears for a "weird career trajectory" that allows someone to make millions of dollars while largely avoiding injury. I'd say he's doing it right.


Yep

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Ut eros lectus, sollicitudin at vestibulum sit amet, elementum et libero. Mauris neque purus, consectetur eget vulputate quis, dapibus ac tortor. Vestibulum libero ante, porttitor eget ullamcorper id, imperdiet vel libero. Fusce nec turpis metus, nec venenatis lorem. Quisque vel nisl libero, vitae consequat arcu. Maecenas pharetra mauris eget sapien blandit venenatis. Integer adipiscing, magna volutpat pharetra ultrices, tellus eros commodo tellus, id molestie libero lorem eu augue. Fusce eu erat lectus. Suspendisse et elit non neque pretium vulputate. Ut dapibus felis et dui pellentesque egestas.
 
2013-10-08 02:39:27 PM

Cybernetic: Anyone else getting a 404 page with lorem ipsum placeholder text instead of TFA?


I'm not sure if "that's the joke" or if the story (Flynn to Packers) was pulled down after it couldn't be confirmed.
 
2013-10-08 08:03:56 PM

Klivian: Signing bonus is guaranteed, and paid to the player up front. It is detailed out over the contract length for salary cap purposes, but he already has that money in hand.

Yearly salary is more complex. If you have a contract prior to the start of the season, once the season begins, you are guaranteed that money for that season. If you are not on a roster, and sign during the season, it is not guaranteed, and you get just your weekly game check.

If you are cut, but get claimed on waivers, the new team picks up your contract. If you clear waivers, and get signed by a new team, you are making money on your new deal, as well as being paid by the old team.


IIRC, you have to be a 'vested' veteran of X number of years (4?) before the salary becomes guaranteed for being on the day 1 roster.  Young players don't get that benefit.

As to Matt Flynn's contract, he had a large signing bonus from the Seahawks and then was traded to the Raiders who gave him another signing bonus + guaranteed salary for this year.  So they are on the hook for his salary no matter what.

HOWEVER, they included offset language in the contract.  So when he signs for $10 and a pack of twizzlers, the cost of the new contract comes off the amount due from the Raiders.  Unless a team is willing to pay him more than the Raiders guaranteed (hint: they won't) he will get signed for the league minimum.
 
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