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(NPR)   George RR Martin comes up with new procrastination scheme   (npr.org) divider line 201
    More: Interesting, George R. R. Martin, Roman Republic, The Winds of Winter, Game of Thrones  
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12407 clicks; posted to Entertainment » on 07 Oct 2013 at 9:00 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-10-07 09:06:19 PM  
So he may not be our biatch, but he is HBO's.
 
2013-10-07 09:06:43 PM  
It's a giant conspiracy to make his fans put pants on and go outside when there is day light.
 
2013-10-07 09:10:15 PM  
I look forward to the day when the HBO writers take his baby from him and write the rest of the story for him.
 
2013-10-07 09:12:40 PM  
CSS:

This July my husband and I went to the Discworld Convention in Baltimore, MD. We were psyched to be seeing Sir Terry Pratchett there. But about two weeks before the convention, Sir Terry cancelled. Know why? He was working really hard to finish his most recent book (Raising Steam) and didn't want to let his many fans down by releasing the book late. It was a bit of a bummer, but I really respected his dedication.

Perhaps he can invite GRRM over for a spot of tea and 'splain this whole "RELEASING YOUR BOOKS ON TIME" thing.
 
2013-10-07 09:12:57 PM  

Infernalist: I look forward to the day when the HBO writers take his baby from him and write the rest of the story for him.


Seems to me that he's not too concerned about it, so I don't know why we should be, except for those who read the books so they can lord it over the TV watchers in a smug, self-satisfied way.
 
2013-10-07 09:15:18 PM  
Actually, if he is a bit stuck, this is a great way to get some ideas flowing. Sometimes doing something completely different helps you approach a creative problem in a different way.
 
2013-10-07 09:16:14 PM  
Good. The Jean Cocteau is worth saving. And better still by someone who would appreciate it.

/I saw Peter's Friends there. That was a fun date but the drive from and back to Albuquerque did us in.
 
2013-10-07 09:16:54 PM  

Koalaesq: CSS:

This July my husband and I went to the Discworld Convention in Baltimore, MD. We were psyched to be seeing Sir Terry Pratchett there. But about two weeks before the convention, Sir Terry cancelled. Know why? He was working really hard to finish his most recent book (Raising Steam) and didn't want to let his many fans down by releasing the book late. It was a bit of a bummer, but I really respected his dedication.

Perhaps he can invite GRRM over for a spot of tea and 'splain this whole "RELEASING YOUR BOOKS ON TIME" thing.


At the same time, Terry is racing against a much harsher deadline to finish all the work he wants to complete.
 
2013-10-07 09:18:51 PM  

Koalaesq: CSS:

This July my husband and I went to the Discworld Convention in Baltimore, MD. We were psyched to be seeing Sir Terry Pratchett there. But about two weeks before the convention, Sir Terry cancelled. Know why? He was working really hard to finish his most recent book (Raising Steam) and didn't want to let his many fans down by releasing the book late. It was a bit of a bummer, but I really respected his dedication.

Perhaps he can invite GRRM over for a spot of tea and 'splain this whole "RELEASING YOUR BOOKS ON TIME" thing.


Freaking poop! I didn't know there was a convention there! I would have gone.

/I live in DC (well, Old Town Alexandria... same thing)
 
2013-10-07 09:20:40 PM  
Well, if he waits long enough, he'll have the "massive coronary" excuse to stop writing completely.....
 
2013-10-07 09:21:09 PM  
"You know, there are writers, and I know some of them, who are very disciplined," Martin says. "Who write, like, four pages a day, every day. And it doesn't matter if their dog got run over by a car that day, or they won the Irish sweepstakes. I'm not one of those writers. I - I write emotionally. I'm an emotional person. So, you know, my best days are the ones where I can keep the distractions at a minimum so I can go into that world, the world of Westeros."

Translation: "I have no idea how I'm going to wrap this up."

Seriously getting the feeling he's going to let reactions to the show dictate how this ends (though if that means we actually get more effing dragons in the books, then cool).
 
2013-10-07 09:22:02 PM  

Infernalist: I look forward to the day when the HBO writers take his baby from him and write the rest of the story for him.


I got hooked on the TV show before i read the books; this could end...very well.
 
2013-10-07 09:22:59 PM  
someone block his access to social media, that should get him to become productive again
 
2013-10-07 09:23:52 PM  
Didn't HBO force him to give them an outline of the entire series to the end, in case he never finishes, because of his procrastination? Or was that just an internet rumour?
 
2013-10-07 09:25:42 PM  

Mad_Radhu: Koalaesq: CSS:

This July my husband and I went to the Discworld Convention in Baltimore, MD. We were psyched to be seeing Sir Terry Pratchett there. But about two weeks before the convention, Sir Terry cancelled. Know why? He was working really hard to finish his most recent book (Raising Steam) and didn't want to let his many fans down by releasing the book late. It was a bit of a bummer, but I really respected his dedication.

Perhaps he can invite GRRM over for a spot of tea and 'splain this whole "RELEASING YOUR BOOKS ON TIME" thing.

At the same time, Terry is racing against a much harsher deadline to finish all the work he wants to complete.


The way Martin is going, he might be dead before he finishes his series too...
 
2013-10-07 09:27:41 PM  

Gaambit: "You know, there are writers, and I know some of them, who are very disciplined," Martin says. "Who write, like, four pages a day, every day


Four pages a day is not very impressive as far as output is concerned, actually. That's only 1,000 words a day. It is not difficult to do 1,000 words a day.

Martin is not even doing 1,000 words a week.
 
2013-10-07 09:27:49 PM  

Koalaesq: CSS:

This July my husband and I went to the Discworld Convention in Baltimore, MD. We were psyched to be seeing Sir Terry Pratchett there. But about two weeks before the convention, Sir Terry cancelled. Know why? He was working really hard to finish his most recent book (Raising Steam) and didn't want to let his many fans down by releasing the book late. It was a bit of a bummer, but I really respected his dedication.

Perhaps he can invite GRRM over for a spot of tea and 'splain this whole "RELEASING YOUR BOOKS ON TIME" thing.


To be fair, his Discworld novels at least aren't exactly comparable in scope or style to ASoIaF other than the fantasy setting...not that that excuses Martin any.


Infernalist: I look forward to the day when the HBO writers take his baby from him and write the rest of the story for him.


I don't, most of the changes the HBO writers have made have kinda sucked.
 
2013-10-07 09:27:58 PM  
I think I started reading the books around 2002 or 3, and I can remember back then people joking about the dude dying before he could complete the series. Doesn't seem to be so silly an idea now. In fact, I'd almost be willing to put money on HBO having to finish it up at this point, which definitely isn't a bad thing.
 
2013-10-07 09:30:24 PM  

Mad_Radhu: Koalaesq: CSS:

This July my husband and I went to the Discworld Convention in Baltimore, MD. We were psyched to be seeing Sir Terry Pratchett there. But about two weeks before the convention, Sir Terry cancelled. Know why? He was working really hard to finish his most recent book (Raising Steam) and didn't want to let his many fans down by releasing the book late. It was a bit of a bummer, but I really respected his dedication.

Perhaps he can invite GRRM over for a spot of tea and 'splain this whole "RELEASING YOUR BOOKS ON TIME" thing.

At the same time, Terry is racing against a much harsher deadline to finish all the work he wants to complete.


Yeah, that's what I was about to say. Sad, but good on him.

As it relates to GRRM? When the article being written about you includes the line "He's panting. He gets out of breath easily. He's 64 and overweight. ", maybe you can understand why he's focusing on his passions.
 
2013-10-07 09:31:40 PM  
CSB: I remember when I had read through A Storm of Swords before A Feast for Crows came out. I had fallen in love with the series, although I thought at least one other series was better. Then I picked up the first Warriors anthology - New Spring was alright (WoT had become very stale for me at that point), Runners of Pern was a lovely foray back into my preteen years, and The Burning Man was welcomed return to my favorite series at that time (Memory, Sorrow, and Throrn, an excellent series that's worth reading). But Hedge Knight... ye gods, did I eat that story up. I was so excited and enthralled by it, I felt like I had rediscovered the Westeros and it was glorious. When it was over, I wanted to cry: I had something so awesome returned to me and then it was cruelly snatched away within seconds. There's been pacing issues since (the Meereenese Knot, for example) and the delays quite frustrating, but there is something to be said for the sheer  quality of the stories to evoke such a reaction. If he can even capture half of that feeling in the home stretch then I'd call it a wild success.

Gaambit: "You know, there are writers, and I know some of them, who are very disciplined," Martin says. "Who write, like, four pages a day, every day. And it doesn't matter if their dog got run over by a car that day, or they won the Irish sweepstakes. I'm not one of those writers. I - I write emotionally. I'm an emotional person. So, you know, my best days are the ones where I can keep the distractions at a minimum so I can go into that world, the world of Westeros."

Translation: "I have no idea how I'm going to wrap this up."

Seriously getting the feeling he's going to let reactions to the show dictate how this ends (though if that means we actually get more effing dragons in the books, then cool).


The shiat he does to his characters... fark, I think he deserves a little bit of leeway when it comes to being in the right emotional place to write some of the hell he's inflicted upon them.
 
2013-10-07 09:31:51 PM  

shoegaze99: Gaambit: "You know, there are writers, and I know some of them, who are very disciplined," Martin says. "Who write, like, four pages a day, every day

Four pages a day is not very impressive as far as output is concerned, actually. That's only 1,000 words a day. It is not difficult to do 1,000 words a day.

Martin is not even doing 1,000 words a week.


He also seems to be an extremely finicky writer who's never really satisfied with his product.  It's entirely possible he's written 2,000 pages for this book and spent a ton of time scrapping and rearranging them so that he's only got 500 of finished product.
 
2013-10-07 09:32:42 PM  

Mad_Radhu: At the same time, Terry is racing against a much harsher deadline to finish all the work he wants to complete.


I hate to be the one to point this out... but I'm pretty sure GRRM  is going to be dead soon.  The man is old as fark with a very jolly jiggle.  My fear has always been that he will simply fall over dead before finishing the series, nevermind deadlines and what not.
 
2013-10-07 09:33:14 PM  

SpdrJay: Well, if he waits long enough, he'll have the "massive coronary" excuse to stop writing completely.....


I hear Uwe Boll and Michael Bay will be hired to finish the series, if GRRM is unable to.
 
2013-10-07 09:33:38 PM  

Koalaesq: This July my husband and I went to the Discworld Convention in Baltimore, MD. We were psyched to be seeing Sir Terry Pratchett there. But about two weeks before the convention, Sir Terry cancelled. Know why? He was working really hard to finish his most recent book (Raising Steam) and didn't want to let his many fans down by releasing the book late. It was a bit of a bummer, but I really respected his dedication.


Given that Pratchett is very literally losing his mind, I think he gets cut whatever slack he needs so long as he's working and healthy.

That said, it's not like Martin has decided to become general manager of the Cocteau and spend his days taking tickets and running films; he's got people who will handle that for him.
 
2013-10-07 09:35:31 PM  
I heard this on NPR earlier today and I've pretty much resigned myself to this ending in two rather horrible ways: 1) Martin dies, and I have to watch HBO piece together his notes to end his story; 2) Martin lives, he doesn't write the next book in time, and HBO goes ahead and films what was supposed to be there, and Martin ends up writing the book to agree with what has already been produced by HBO.

The last two books weren't all that great, and while I understand the circumstances and motivations behind making those changes, the books still weren't all that great. The Winds of Winter is his chance to remind us that he doesn't suck, that he's not milking it, and that he is moving towards a destination. It's okay to make a couple mistakes. It's not okay to release a book every six years and still make the same mistakes.
 
2013-10-07 09:38:28 PM  
Perhaps he's decided he likes the tv show more and wants to wrap that up first?
 
2013-10-07 09:38:50 PM  

Dwight_Yeast: Koalaesq: This July my husband and I went to the Discworld Convention in Baltimore, MD. We were psyched to be seeing Sir Terry Pratchett there. But about two weeks before the convention, Sir Terry cancelled. Know why? He was working really hard to finish his most recent book (Raising Steam) and didn't want to let his many fans down by releasing the book late. It was a bit of a bummer, but I really respected his dedication.

Given that Pratchett is very literally losing his mind, I think he gets cut whatever slack he needs so long as he's working and healthy.

That said, it's not like Martin has decided to become general manager of the Cocteau and spend his days taking tickets and running films; he's got people who will handle that for him.


Pratchett has made arrangements for things to be taken over by daughter if and when.

*sad ook*
 
2013-10-07 09:43:16 PM  

Solon Isonomia: The shiat he does to his characters... fark, I think he deserves a little bit of leeway when it comes to being in the right emotional place to write some of the hell he's inflicted upon them.


The problem is that he's admitted that he's slow to write, acknowledged that he needs to keep distractions to a minimum in order to write, and yet willingly surrounds himself with distractions in order to keep himself from writing. Yeah, yeah, he's not our biatch and all, but he's made a promise to his readers here. If he wants to break it because he'd rather be watching movies in a communal setting, or being part of Hollywood, that's his prerogative, but his legacy will end up being not that he wrote one of the seminal works in fantasy, but that he tried to write one of the seminal works in fantasy and gave up, sold out, or stopped caring.

It's ultimately his right as to how he wants to be remembered - if at all - but we have every right to judge him for ourselves based on what could have been and what was.
 
2013-10-07 09:43:42 PM  

shoegaze99: Four pages a day is not very impressive as far as output is concerned, actually. That's only 1,000 words a day. It is not difficult to do 1,000 words a day.


I would love to write 1000 words a day. I usually top out at around 600 before it starts to get tedious and I don't like what's coming out. But then, I find it difficult to just put anything down and expect to go back and edit it to something better. And if I'm not in the mood to write, forcing myself to do so only makes me less inclined to like what I write, and therefore make me less inclined to want to write when I'm in the mood. However, in my defense, I don't make a metric crap-ton of money writing. I'm certain that would give me a little more motivation.
 
2013-10-07 09:44:13 PM  

digistil: SpdrJay: Well, if he waits long enough, he'll have the "massive coronary" excuse to stop writing completely.....

I hear Uwe Boll and Michael Bay will be hired to finish the series, if GRRM is unable to.


Oh, I hope they hold out for Damon Lindelof instead!
 
2013-10-07 09:44:50 PM  

firsttiger: So he may not be our biatch, but he is HBO's.


He's our biatch when we SAY he's our biatch.

We ARE the one who reads!

/Colbert
 
2013-10-07 09:45:08 PM  

rugman11: Infernalist: I look forward to the day when the HBO writers take his baby from him and write the rest of the story for him.

Seems to me that he's not too concerned about it, so I don't know why we should be, except for those who read the books so they can lord it over the TV watchers in a smug, self-satisfied way.


1-media-cdn.foolz.us
 
2013-10-07 09:45:48 PM  

SpdrJay: digistil: SpdrJay: Well, if he waits long enough, he'll have the "massive coronary" excuse to stop writing completely.....

I hear Uwe Boll and Michael Bay will be hired to finish the series, if GRRM is unable to.

Oh, I hope they hold out for Damon Lindelof instead!


Vince Gilligan *is* available...
 
2013-10-07 09:46:10 PM  
Just picture the tortures George is inflicting on his characters as a result of the Giant's shiat play this season.  Winds will be done when it's done.  There are plenty of books worth reading in the meantime.  If I remember right he had a good portion of Winds material when Dance was finished.  That said he apparently tossed out and re-wrote about half of Dance when it wasn't getting him where he wanted the story to go.

/waiting for Raising Steam too.  Will really miss Pratchett when he can no longer perform his art.
 
2013-10-07 09:46:20 PM  

urger: Dwight_Yeast: Koalaesq: This July my husband and I went to the Discworld Convention in Baltimore, MD. We were psyched to be seeing Sir Terry Pratchett there. But about two weeks before the convention, Sir Terry cancelled. Know why? He was working really hard to finish his most recent book (Raising Steam) and didn't want to let his many fans down by releasing the book late. It was a bit of a bummer, but I really respected his dedication.

Given that Pratchett is very literally losing his mind, I think he gets cut whatever slack he needs so long as he's working and healthy.

That said, it's not like Martin has decided to become general manager of the Cocteau and spend his days taking tickets and running films; he's got people who will handle that for him.

Pratchett has made arrangements for things to be taken over by daughter if and when.

*sad ook*


The particular brand of Alzheimer's he has is more motor neurological rather than the brain eating cognitive type. He can still write but can not type well, but his cognitive (for now) is not affected.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/lifestyle/9532983/Sir-Terry-Pratchett-I-t ho ught-my-Alzheimers-would-be-a-lot-worse-than-this-by-now.html
 
2013-10-07 09:46:35 PM  

Barry Lyndon's Annuity Cheque: I heard this on NPR earlier today and I've pretty much resigned myself to this ending in two rather horrible ways: 1) Martin dies, and I have to watch HBO piece together his notes to end his story; 2) Martin lives, he doesn't write the next book in time, and HBO goes ahead and films what was supposed to be there, and Martin ends up writing the book to agree with what has already been produced by HBO.

The last two books weren't all that great, and while I understand the circumstances and motivations behind making those changes, the books still weren't all that great. The Winds of Winter is his chance to remind us that he doesn't suck, that he's not milking it, and that he is moving towards a destination. It's okay to make a couple mistakes. It's not okay to release a book every six years and still make the same mistakes.



I don't get that concept.
Having just finished books 4 and 5 (last week actually, so they are fresh in my mind), they aren't bad books by a longshot. They are fleshing out some new characters (Dornish), they tell the tale of what happens to Jon while Sam is on his trip, and they continue Arya and Dany's stories.

We get more Bran, more Tyrion, Some Jamie, and Cersei's run in with the faith.

It's not as broad a scope in the great scheme of things, but the books do hold up on their own.

Why do people down these so badly?
 
2013-10-07 09:49:45 PM  

Virtual Pariah: Barry Lyndon's Annuity Cheque: I heard this on NPR earlier today and I've pretty much resigned myself to this ending in two rather horrible ways: 1) Martin dies, and I have to watch HBO piece together his notes to end his story; 2) Martin lives, he doesn't write the next book in time, and HBO goes ahead and films what was supposed to be there, and Martin ends up writing the book to agree with what has already been produced by HBO.

The last two books weren't all that great, and while I understand the circumstances and motivations behind making those changes, the books still weren't all that great. The Winds of Winter is his chance to remind us that he doesn't suck, that he's not milking it, and that he is moving towards a destination. It's okay to make a couple mistakes. It's not okay to release a book every six years and still make the same mistakes.


I don't get that concept.
Having just finished books 4 and 5 (last week actually, so they are fresh in my mind), they aren't bad books by a longshot. They are fleshing out some new characters (Dornish), they tell the tale of what happens to Jon while Sam is on his trip, and they continue Arya and Dany's stories.

We get more Bran, more Tyrion, Some Jamie, and Cersei's run in with the faith.

It's not as broad a scope in the great scheme of things, but the books do hold up on their own.

Why do people down these so badly?


People were pissed that Dany and Tyrion vanished from the stage for Feast.  I thought it was fine but Feast and Dance really seem like a single book.
 
2013-10-07 09:51:12 PM  
You know how GRRM loves to fark with the fans of a character.  What better character to kill off than GRRM?  It's his ultimate Red Wedding.
 
2013-10-07 09:51:28 PM  

greatgodyoshi: But then, I find it difficult to just put anything down and expect to go back and edit it to something better. And if I'm not in the mood to write, forcing myself to do so only makes me less inclined to like what I write, and therefore make me less inclined to want to write when I'm in the mood. However, in my defense, I don't make a metric crap-ton of money writing. I'm certain that would give me a little more motivation.


Everyone is different, there is no one size fits all approach to writing, but I feel like one of the most important skills you can learn as a writer is how to get work done even when you don't feel like it. It's hard to get past relying on rushes of inspiration to write, but once you do it becomes relatively easy to just sit down and get things DONE when you need to simply because you've trained yourself to sit down and work. I've also learned that it doesn't matter if you like what's coming out as it's coming out. It always look different when you look at it later, anyway, and as the saying goes, 95 percent of writing is rewriting/editing. As long as you're getting something down on the page, you have something you can work with later.

But like I said, there is no once size fits all. You can only do what works for you. What might be right for you may not be right for some. (♪ A man is born, he's a man of means!♪ )
 
2013-10-07 09:52:29 PM  
Also, I'm of the opinion that while your work enjoys the protection of copyright, you DO owe it to the public to do something with that work, otherwise step aside.

AKA the shiat or get off the toilet clause.
 
2013-10-07 09:53:17 PM  
George R. R. Martin, the Good-Parts Shortcut: Read books 1 and 3, and ignore everything else.
 
2013-10-07 09:53:22 PM  

shoegaze99: Gaambit: "You know, there are writers, and I know some of them, who are very disciplined," Martin says. "Who write, like, four pages a day, every day

Four pages a day is not very impressive as far as output is concerned, actually. That's only 1,000 words a day. It is not difficult to do 1,000 words a day.

Martin is not even doing 1,000 words a week.


Writing 1000 words everyday can be pretty difficult.  Some days, I have trouble getting a full page out.  Some days I can hit 5000 words and still keep going.

/need to write more
//need to send out more stuff
///sold my third story on Saturday
////slashies
 
2013-10-07 09:56:33 PM  

Virtual Pariah: Barry Lyndon's Annuity Cheque: I heard this on NPR earlier today and I've pretty much resigned myself to this ending in two rather horrible ways: 1) Martin dies, and I have to watch HBO piece together his notes to end his story; 2) Martin lives, he doesn't write the next book in time, and HBO goes ahead and films what was supposed to be there, and Martin ends up writing the book to agree with what has already been produced by HBO.

The last two books weren't all that great, and while I understand the circumstances and motivations behind making those changes, the books still weren't all that great. The Winds of Winter is his chance to remind us that he doesn't suck, that he's not milking it, and that he is moving towards a destination. It's okay to make a couple mistakes. It's not okay to release a book every six years and still make the same mistakes.


I don't get that concept.
Having just finished books 4 and 5 (last week actually, so they are fresh in my mind), they aren't bad books by a longshot. They are fleshing out some new characters (Dornish), they tell the tale of what happens to Jon while Sam is on his trip, and they continue Arya and Dany's stories.

We get more Bran, more Tyrion, Some Jamie, and Cersei's run in with the faith.

It's not as broad a scope in the great scheme of things, but the books do hold up on their own.

Why do people down these so badly?


Nerds are whiny biatches.  That's the first rule of nerddom.  If it doesn't do EXACTLY what you want it to, it sucks and must be vilified.  I remember when people biatched about the religion in Battlestar (even though it's a huge theme from the Miniseries all the way to the end), Wheel of Time (which ends amazingly), Lost (which holds up really well when watched in large doses) etc, etc.  If the author or writer's don't somehow magically provide the exact right thing (even if it's contrary to their artistic intent), then the author sucks.
 
2013-10-07 09:56:57 PM  

Nefarious: I thought it was fine but Feast and Dance really seem like a single book.


The Feast / Dance MEGABOOK reading order
 
2013-10-07 09:57:25 PM  

Nefarious: Just picture the tortures George is inflicting on his characters as a result of the Giant's shiat play this season.  Winds will be done when it's done.  There are plenty of books worth reading in the meantime.  If I remember right he had a good portion of Winds material when Dance was finished.  That said he apparently tossed out and re-wrote about half of Dance when it wasn't getting him where he wanted the story to go.

/waiting for Raising Steam too.  Will really miss Pratchett when he can no longer perform his art.


Let me guess, Danys playing city manager wasn't awesome enough so he had to rewrite it to contain more ges, tes, and zes.
 
2013-10-07 10:00:52 PM  

Virtual Pariah: Why do people down these so badly?


Mostly because Martin's initial idea was to just jump forward a few years, because he initially wrote some of the characters too young, and let the reader pick up the missed stories as they went along. He stopped and turned it into two books because upon writing, because he found himself having to do too many flashbacks. What they ended up being for current readers was years-long waits for characters to travel for a thousand pages in order to put themselves in a position for something interesting to happen.

If you read both books fairly close together, it may have been better. But for me, A Feast for Crows was a somewhat acceptable "getting characters where they need to be" book, and A Dance with Dragons was a six-year wait for a giant novel about characters getting where they need to be. Things are still happening, yeah, but Martin has pretty clearly defined his major characters at this point, and they did pretty much jack shiat during the books.
 
2013-10-07 10:04:41 PM  

urger: Dwight_Yeast: Koalaesq: This July my husband and I went to the Discworld Convention in Baltimore, MD. We were psyched to be seeing Sir Terry Pratchett there. But about two weeks before the convention, Sir Terry cancelled. Know why? He was working really hard to finish his most recent book (Raising Steam) and didn't want to let his many fans down by releasing the book late. It was a bit of a bummer, but I really respected his dedication.

Given that Pratchett is very literally losing his mind, I think he gets cut whatever slack he needs so long as he's working and healthy.

That said, it's not like Martin has decided to become general manager of the Cocteau and spend his days taking tickets and running films; he's got people who will handle that for him.

Pratchett has made arrangements for things to be taken over by daughter if and when.

*sad ook*


I need to get off my ass and send that letter I've written to him while he can still read it.

That said, remember, as the quilt he was given shortly after his diagnosis was made public says:

[He] Aetn't dead.
 
2013-10-07 10:05:52 PM  

Virtual Pariah: Barry Lyndon's Annuity Cheque: I heard this on NPR earlier today and I've pretty much resigned myself to this ending in two rather horrible ways: 1) Martin dies, and I have to watch HBO piece together his notes to end his story; 2) Martin lives, he doesn't write the next book in time, and HBO goes ahead and films what was supposed to be there, and Martin ends up writing the book to agree with what has already been produced by HBO.

The last two books weren't all that great, and while I understand the circumstances and motivations behind making those changes, the books still weren't all that great. The Winds of Winter is his chance to remind us that he doesn't suck, that he's not milking it, and that he is moving towards a destination. It's okay to make a couple mistakes. It's not okay to release a book every six years and still make the same mistakes.


I don't get that concept.
Having just finished books 4 and 5 (last week actually, so they are fresh in my mind), they aren't bad books by a longshot. They are fleshing out some new characters (Dornish), they tell the tale of what happens to Jon while Sam is on his trip, and they continue Arya and Dany's stories.

We get more Bran, more Tyrion, Some Jamie, and Cersei's run in with the faith.

It's not as broad a scope in the great scheme of things, but the books do hold up on their own.

Why do people down these so badly?


I started reading the series just after Dance with Dragons was published, so I didn't have to wait for any of the books and I enjoyed book 4 and 5 immensely. I feel most fans are so critical of book 4 and 5 just because they read the first 3 close together and than waited so long between the next installments. Book 3 ended with a few cliffhangers than weren't addressed until book 5, so I imagine waiting 11 years to find out what happened to your favourite characters was likely a little frustrating.
 
2013-10-07 10:05:53 PM  

Nefarious: Virtual Pariah: Barry Lyndon's Annuity Cheque: I heard this on NPR earlier today and I've pretty much resigned myself to this ending in two rather horrible ways: 1) Martin dies, and I have to watch HBO piece together his notes to end his story; 2) Martin lives, he doesn't write the next book in time, and HBO goes ahead and films what was supposed to be there, and Martin ends up writing the book to agree with what has already been produced by HBO.

The last two books weren't all that great, and while I understand the circumstances and motivations behind making those changes, the books still weren't all that great. The Winds of Winter is his chance to remind us that he doesn't suck, that he's not milking it, and that he is moving towards a destination. It's okay to make a couple mistakes. It's not okay to release a book every six years and still make the same mistakes.


I don't get that concept.
Having just finished books 4 and 5 (last week actually, so they are fresh in my mind), they aren't bad books by a longshot. They are fleshing out some new characters (Dornish), they tell the tale of what happens to Jon while Sam is on his trip, and they continue Arya and Dany's stories.

We get more Bran, more Tyrion, Some Jamie, and Cersei's run in with the faith.

It's not as broad a scope in the great scheme of things, but the books do hold up on their own.

Why do people down these so badly?

People were pissed that Dany and Tyrion vanished from the stage for Feast.  I thought it was fine but Feast and Dance really seem like a single book.


They were well-written books to be sure, but they lacked the impact of any of the first three. Game of Thrones, Clash of Kings, and Storm of Swords all had really well-written and important climaxes. Neither Feast for Crows nor Dance With Dragons had anything nearly as impactful as Ned, the Battle of Blackwater, or the Red Wedding to offer. Contra Feast and Dance with Steven Erikson's Malazan novels. The Malazan books are arguably even larger in scope (though admittedly not as detailed), but each and every book in the series provides a satisfying climax while moving the plot along. Martin moved the plot along in Feast and Dance; he just forgot to include much of a climax.

I also wasn't a huge fan of how both Feast and Dance ended on something of a cliffhanger. That's fine for television or even regularly-published works like comic books, but I don't think it really works well when you've got five years between books.  I keep picturing the endings of Feast and Dance being read by the South Park voiceover guy: "What name did Brienne shout? How will Daenerys react to her current situation? Can Jon Snow get out of his current mess?"
 
2013-10-07 10:07:52 PM  

RatMaster999: Writing 1000 words everyday can be pretty difficult. Some days, I have trouble getting a full page out. Some days I can hit 5000 words and still keep going.


Probably depends on whether or not you write for a living. If you're doing it on the side, aspiring to write while holding down a full-time job, I can understand facing struggles from time to time. Writing on inspiration is a big part of what you're doing in that case. If your job is to write, though, I feel like you (the general "you") should have reached a point where you've trained yourself to work when it's time to work.

And just to clarify, I'm not expecting something from Martin that I don't expect of myself. I'm not an entitled fan demanding he get to work. The dude doesn't owe me anything. I'm just surprised that he's impressed by a four-page-a-day pace, because even I can do it and writing is not my primary means of paying the bills.
 
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