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(The Atlantic)   Why do Americans have such large refrigerators?   (theatlantic.com) divider line 188
    More: Interesting, Americans, shelf lives, sustainable growth, Boston Scientific, refrigerators, family-owned  
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13315 clicks; posted to Main » on 06 Oct 2013 at 3:25 PM (42 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-10-06 10:13:47 PM

ReapTheChaos: Something I noticed a lot when I lived overseas was how they tend to keep a lot of foods in a cupboard rather than refrigerated. Eggs, cheese, mayonnaise, jelly/jam and other condiments, all kept on the countertop or in the pantry. If they had left over chicken from dinner they would just put it in a covered dish on the counter and eat it for lunch the next day. I don't know how the rates of food poisoning compare form there to here but I'd bet it's much higher.


I heard at one time, Americans would carried fried chicken in their lunch boxes.  I never tried the idea of carry around fried chicken till lunch, before eating it, so I have no idea how that would work out.  As for cheese, mayonnaise, jelly/jam and other condiments, we don't need to refrigerate most of those.  I would still keep eggs cool, because coming through a supermarket, there is added risk of time since the egg was laid.  The wife is talking of getting chickens, so I would likely not refrigerate fresh eggs as long as we use them quickly.

I speculate the wars that ravaged Europe is part of the reason why refrigeration didn't become so important to them, but I guess having markets close by could mean a less dependence of long term storage.  I do find it odd how it is taking a long time to get Americans to accept the square boxed milk as real milk, just because it is kept as dry stock.  They'll accept soups and soup stocks as canned in the same square boxes, but somehow the milk must already be bad.
 
2013-10-06 10:14:36 PM
Genetics, pee wee.
 
2013-10-06 10:16:57 PM

ReapTheChaos: Something I noticed a lot when I lived overseas was how they tend to keep a lot of foods in a cupboard rather than refrigerated. Eggs, cheese, mayonnaise, jelly/jam and other condiments, all kept on the countertop or in the pantry. If they had left over chicken from dinner they would just put it in a covered dish on the counter and eat it for lunch the next day. I don't know how the rates of food poisoning compare form there to here but I'd bet it's much higher.


No, it isn't. It's just that Americans have been brainwashed into believing that anything that has been out of the fridge for more than an hour will kill them and has to be thrown away. How do these people think the human race survived before refrigerators were invented? And no, everyone didn't live on a farm and slaughtered/picked/harvested everything they ate minutes before eating it. Ships sailed at sea for months and lived on salted beef etc.

Good beef is grey, not red. Game should be hung for a week in 'cool room' temperature, far above fridge temperature, before eating it. Stores in the UK don't even keep eggs chilled, they are just on a shelf at store temperature.
 
2013-10-06 10:20:30 PM

lack of warmth:

I heard at one time, Americans would carried fried chicken in their lunch boxes.  I never tried the idea of carry around fried chicken till lunch, before eating it, so I have no idea how that would work out.


Chicken bought from a KFC or similar will last a couple of days at room temperature and still be safe to eat.
 
2013-10-06 10:32:49 PM
Easily available ice is my sure indicator of a civilized, stable, technologically advanced country. Love you, Europe, but when I get home from visiting you my first order is a soda with ice and a salad dressed with something other than oil and vinegar.
 
2013-10-06 10:36:13 PM
Most people would agree that fresh food tastes better than anything that's been kept in a refrigerator for even a short amount of time.

Nobody thinks this though. The author doesn't seem to understand that cooling something isn't the same as freezing it. If you think that putting something in a refrigerator makes it LESS fresh, you're a ninny.
 
2013-10-06 10:40:53 PM

Gleeman: Majick Thise: 3 DVD players

What do you do, 'channel surf' between films?

curious_dog.jpg


lol not exactly

Amazon prematurely marked down their HDDVD movies right after blu ray won the war. 1$ a piece for most but never more than 4$ per High Definition movie. They did this for one weekend so I bought a ton of them then they raised teh prices again. So I have my LG SuperBlu which plays Bluray and HDDVD I have a Sony that is a 3D bluray player and a Toshiba HDDVD player as a spare red player just in case.
 
2013-10-06 10:55:30 PM

Coco LaFemme: Because unlike Europeans, who tend to go shopping for fresh produce and meats every couple days or so, Americans buy a few weeks worth of food all at once, and we need the space to keep the food cold and fresh until we're ready to eat it.  That, and we don't eat the amount of fresh produce per day a lot of people in other countries do, so buying it every other day makes no fiscal sense.


I've live in Europe for a time, and dealt with the "small fridge" thing. It has its advantages and disadvantages

This is how it goes:

Electricity is high in cost. thats bad. They have small fridges that take less to run. Thats good. The fridge is small, so you have to shop more often. thats bad. Because you are shopping more often, the food is going to be fresher. thats good. You arent the only one who goes shopping more often, so the stores are more crowded. thats bad. Don't worry, your job closes every day for three hours at lunchtime, so you can go to the store. thats good. Oops, national GDP is down because everyone is running the same errands every day and nobody is at work. thats bad.

Like many things, it comes down to a lifestyle choice. Europe tends to do less, and take its time about it, while trying to bring up quality. US is trying to maximize the clock, and that means doing things in bulk, even if it brings the quality down a bit.
 
2013-10-06 10:57:36 PM
A couple years ago when the fridge that came with my house died, I looked into buying a smaller model, as it was rarely more than a quarter full.  What I discovered was that smaller "apartment" fridges in the States are no more efficient than a standard size, upright fridge.

So even though I don't need the fridge space, I bought a full-sized Kenmore fridge.  The freezer is generally pretty well full, and that was another problem with the smaller fridges.

/three blocks from my nearest grocery store
//at least half a dozen grocery stores within three miles of my house
///realized recently I like grocery shopping.
 
2013-10-06 11:04:11 PM
Dwight_Yeast: A couple years ago when the fridge that came with my house died, I looked into buying a smaller model, as it was rarely more than a quarter full.  What I discovered was that smaller "apartment" fridges in the States are no more efficient than a standard size, upright fridge.

They aren't the only thing. The MPG between a Ford Tarus sedan and a F-150 truck is minimal, for instance.
 
2013-10-06 11:32:10 PM
because we're exceptional!
 
2013-10-06 11:37:03 PM

vodka: It's simple, people in many other countries spend a lot more time going out to get food (either to collect and bring back or eat out) compared to Americans.


But hey, let's feel bad about it, I guess. Because Europe just has to make itself feel better they're not us now matter how stupid the subject is.

Seriously? Fridges, now?

/dnrtfa
 
2013-10-06 11:44:36 PM

lack of warmth: ReapTheChaos: Something I noticed a lot when I lived overseas was how they tend to keep a lot of foods in a cupboard rather than refrigerated. Eggs, cheese, mayonnaise, jelly/jam and other condiments, all kept on the countertop or in the pantry. If they had left over chicken from dinner they would just put it in a covered dish on the counter and eat it for lunch the next day. I don't know how the rates of food poisoning compare form there to here but I'd bet it's much higher.

I heard at one time, Americans would carried fried chicken in their lunch boxes.  I never tried the idea of carry around fried chicken till lunch, before eating it, so I have no idea how that would work out.  As for cheese, mayonnaise, jelly/jam and other condiments, we don't need to refrigerate most of those.  I would still keep eggs cool, because coming through a supermarket, there is added risk of time since the egg was laid.  The wife is talking of getting chickens, so I would likely not refrigerate fresh eggs as long as we use them quickly.

I speculate the wars that ravaged Europe is part of the reason why refrigeration didn't become so important to them, but I guess having markets close by could mean a less dependence of long term storage.  I do find it odd how it is taking a long time to get Americans to accept the square boxed milk as real milk, just because it is kept as dry stock.  They'll accept soups and soup stocks as canned in the same square boxes, but somehow the milk must already be bad.


Carrying fried chicken for lunch worked fine for me in junior high school, I did it quite a bit.  You don't need to refrigerate eggs fresh out of the chicken, but once they've been washed, you do.  And you'll freak out Americans if you don't keep your mayo cold, even though it's actually fine.  People get weird about my butter sitting out.

Why would I want room temperature milk?  It's a smaller container, higher price, and isn't as good a product.  I can easily go through a gallon of milk in less than a week, so shelf life isn't going to win any points.  Oh, and the boxed stuff is more processed, it doesn't taste nearly as good as the local farm unhomogenized stuff I've got in the fridge.
 
2013-10-06 11:57:27 PM

DarkVader: Carrying fried chicken for lunch worked fine for me in junior high school, I did it quite a bit.  You don't need to refrigerate eggs fresh out of the chicken, but once they've been washed, you do.  And you'll freak out Americans if you don't keep your mayo cold, even though it's actually fine.  People get weird about my butter sitting out.


I carry fried chicken around -- no problems. I worked a contract a few months back where two of the workers had farms and they would bring eggs in and leave them out for weeks until people took them home. I thought that was weird.

The warm mayo thing does gross me out, since I know from experience that warm mayo outside of a jar seems to just turn back into oil and eggs. When you leave mayo out in an unopened jar and it warms to room temperature (70 - 80 degrees) what do you experience? Is it a warm but white mayo? Or is it a stinky warm puddle of mucous?

Re: butter I've been told it's safe to leave salted butter out, so I do, but I would love to find a cold butter peltier effect plate, plug it in, and it brings the butter temperature to something above refrigeration, something below room temp, because I like spreadable butter, but I do like colder butter.
 
2013-10-07 12:12:10 AM
I have two.  One in the kitchen.  One in the garage (pronounced guh-rahj).
 
2013-10-07 12:12:26 AM
Well, we have a huge fridge for many reasons, but one of the main ones is because a 3-4 tier cake won't fit in an under-counter fridge.
 
2013-10-07 12:51:51 AM

DarkVader: Why would I want room temperature milk?  It's a smaller container, higher price, and isn't as good a product.  I can easily go through a gallon of milk in less than a week, so shelf life isn't going to win any points.  Oh, and the boxed stuff is more processed, it doesn't taste nearly as good as the local farm unhomogenized stuff I've got in the fridge.


I didn't say a thing about room temperature milk, the ability to chill before opening is there.  I've bought the stuff for camping, as I only need to chill ahead what the kids will drink soon.  For a portion of the world, this the only way they can get a steady supply of milk.  Also, if you need to get large supply at a time for long periods of time, the box milk will last nearly as long as canned foods.  As well as a safer way of packing milk in lunches.  It really depends on needs.

I agree about the other stuff, like the eggs, but I wouldn't trust store eggs outside the fridge for long as they are out of the chick for two or three weeks before they are bought.  I think the date on the carton is something like 30 days after laying.

RoyBatty: The warm mayo thing does gross me out, since I know from experience that warm mayo outside of a jar seems to just turn back into oil and eggs. When you leave mayo out in an unopened jar and it warms to room temperature (70 - 80 degrees) what do you experience? Is it a warm but white mayo? Or is it a stinky warm puddle of mucous?

Re: butter I've been told it's safe to leave salted butter out, so I do, but I would love to find a cold butter peltier effect plate, plug it in, and it brings the butter temperature to something above refrigeration, something below room temp, because I like spreadable butter, but I do like colder butter.


I've worked in restaurants that only refrigerated mayo at night, and everyone who freaks out about room temp mayo has had it because it is an industry standard and accepted practice by the health board.  I leave my butter out as long as it doesn't melt in the dish, and it is unsalted.
 
2013-10-07 01:10:13 AM
My money is on a near perfect correlation globally between fridge size and arse size.
I know (anecdotally) that my fat-arse friends and relatives all have excessively sized fridges (especially my Amorphous Aunt Linda). Myself and my skinny friends have smaller than average fridges.
Perhaps a chicken or the egg scenario happening, though.
 
2013-10-07 01:39:09 AM
... because the nearest grocery is 51 miles and we go once every two weeks. Not everyone lives in a big city with a Piggly Wiggly a mile away ...
 
2013-10-07 02:23:35 AM

lack of warmth: ReapTheChaos: Something I noticed a lot when I lived overseas was how they tend to keep a lot of foods in a cupboard rather than refrigerated. Eggs, cheese, mayonnaise, jelly/jam and other condiments, all kept on the countertop or in the pantry. If they had left over chicken from dinner they would just put it in a covered dish on the counter and eat it for lunch the next day. I don't know how the rates of food poisoning compare form there to here but I'd bet it's much higher.

I heard at one time, Americans would carried fried chicken in their lunch boxes.  I never tried the idea of carry around fried chicken till lunch, before eating it, so I have no idea how that would work out.  As for cheese, mayonnaise, jelly/jam and other condiments, we don't need to refrigerate most of those.  I would still keep eggs cool, because coming through a supermarket, there is added risk of time since the egg was laid.  The wife is talking of getting chickens, so I would likely not refrigerate fresh eggs as long as we use them quickly.

I speculate the wars that ravaged Europe is part of the reason why refrigeration didn't become so important to them, but I guess having markets close by could mean a less dependence of long term storage.  I do find it odd how it is taking a long time to get Americans to accept the square boxed milk as real milk, just because it is kept as dry stock.  They'll accept soups and soup stocks as canned in the same square boxes, but somehow the milk must already be bad.


Sorry but I've had that boxed milk, it tastes nothing like fresh. It works fine for cooking/baking but I would never drink it by the glass or pour it on cereal.
 
2013-10-07 02:55:51 AM

Tillmaster: It means more current, actually, which is why the power cables on electric kettles warm up. Less voltage, though.


V = I R

R stays the same, divided V in 2. Seems like you get half the current.
 
2013-10-07 06:39:46 AM
We have large refrigerators because food is cheap in this country.  We're not like the Europeans where they have to work a lot longer than we do so they can buy their groceries.  Another reason we have large refrigerators is because we want them.

Also my fridge does not contribute to air pollution.  If man caused global warming were real, my fridge wouldn't contribute to it.  Around here we split atoms to get our electricity or dam rivers.
 
2013-10-07 07:24:29 AM

Mrbogey: The big draws in a home are in order:

1. Air Conditioning
2. Water heating
3. Lighting
4. Refrigeration.
5. Electronics

Your best bets to use little energy are use on demand hot water(natural gas), keep your AC set to as high as you can tolerate in the summer and as low in the winter, and go to bed shortly after the sun sets. Refrigeration is being outpaced by electronics for electrical usage due to efficient designs of the newer fridges.


Refrigerator is said to be the second most energy-consuming device, but...

"a modern energy-efficient model uses only 350 kWh per year"

Are you kidding?  350kWh is what I use in a month.  I used 2400kWh in one month to run an air conditioner (96% hydro, 4% wind), which was an unpleasant surprise when I got a $518 electric bill.  This was a 1380W 12000BTU window AC that could cool a 400sqft space with 10 foot high ceilings; but alas, poor insulation meant I was getting more than 4kW insolation into my house.  I had the roof painted with an 84% reflective (estimate after several years of weathering) elastomer and that eliminated most of the incoming heat; an insulation job will be undertaken for the winter, but i only pay $300/mo to keep the place heated anyway even down below freezing outdoor temperatures.

350kWh per year equates to roughly 30kWh per month.  Out of 400kWh?  It's not even 10%.
 
2013-10-07 08:41:24 AM
There's a lot of American household items which are designed bigger than in many European nations. I've seen stoves in kitchens that basically take up 1/4 of the available space. Sinks which would look appropriate in restaurant kitchens and counters packed with enough electronic cooking devices to start a store.

European homes are typically much older and don't have the room for US size appliances or furniture. They use small appliances because big ones wont fit.
 
2013-10-07 09:01:44 AM

Flint Ironstag: ReapTheChaos: Something I noticed a lot when I lived overseas was how they tend to keep a lot of foods in a cupboard rather than refrigerated. Eggs, cheese, mayonnaise, jelly/jam and other condiments, all kept on the countertop or in the pantry. If they had left over chicken from dinner they would just put it in a covered dish on the counter and eat it for lunch the next day. I don't know how the rates of food poisoning compare form there to here but I'd bet it's much higher.

No, it isn't. It's just that Americans have been brainwashed into believing that anything that has been out of the fridge for more than an hour will kill them and has to be thrown away.


The USDA says 2 hours actually.
http://www.fsis.usda.gov/wps/portal/fsis/topics/food-safety-educatio n/ !ut/p/a1/rVHLbsIwEPyaHi2va_LwkSLxSNUgCBTIBZnESU2xExQX0X59nVQqVVUKSLFPq 5md3dnBMV7iWPODzLmRhea7uo7dNUzAJawHwZiRPozC58n4sdcDP3IsYfUPIaRX9p95Xbj Uv8AxjhNtSvOCV1klK5QU2ght7qCp9m-iarxsduIEJYVShf4GK0suihRVPBPm3cJmLXUqj rV2yXORikrmuqkSmdo5jHHuJB7iDvNQJwMf-cT1kNgAzSh3mev6OLjCutzu93HXGqgXOxq 8bN1Bc5-fewCxfxTSqDMMQgrjzm_CHxF-Ec5ntLIheieFwbQe0Y9mZOA8EBgSHN14uwuCt GVBBm0L3rctePsNSzWfK3-bqQV6nfpAnfLwMcuUWodP3U8mAinS/?1dmy&current=true &urile=wcm%3apath%3a%2Ffsis-content%2Ffsis-questionable-content%2Ffood -safety%2Ffood-storage-preparation-and-handling%2Fct_index


How do these people think the human race survived before refrigerators were invented? And no, everyone didn't live on a farm and slaughtered/picked/harvested everything they ate minutes before eating it. Ships sailed at sea for months and lived on salted beef etc.

Well, a lot of people died young for many unknown reasons back then.  Life expectancy for sailors was particularly low.  The very reason that press gangs existed in the first place was to "recruit" men into being sailors to replace the ones who kept on dying.  British ships even resorted to impressing American sailors at sea back in the early 19th century.  It was one of the causes of the War of 1812.
 
kth
2013-10-07 09:50:40 AM

lack of warmth: Re: butter I've been told it's safe to leave salted butter out, so I do, but I would love to find a cold butter peltier effect plate, plug it in, and it brings the butter temperature to something above refrigeration, something below room temp, because I like spreadable butter, but I do like colder butter.

I've worked in restaurants that only refrigerated mayo at night, and everyone who freaks out about room temp mayo has had it because it is an industry standard and accepted practice by the health board. I leave my butter out as long as it doesn't melt in the dish, and it is unsalted.


We have a butter bell for salted butter. It's a little crock that you put upside down in water.  Spreadable butter. Plus it's cute.

static.yuppiechef.com

When we're cooking, we often forget to put the salted butter back in the fridge, we've never had an issue.
 
2013-10-07 10:59:30 AM
Also just to throw this out there... it's said that a full fridge is more efficient than an empty one. This makes some sense to me. If I have 20 gallons of already chilled beer in there and I open the door to get one whatever temperature change there was would be offset by the cold beer still in there. If the fridge had to come on at all it wouldn't have to run as long because of all the cold beer helping return it to its normal temp
 
2013-10-07 11:11:02 AM

Clemkadidlefark: ... because the nearest grocery is 51 miles and we go once every two weeks. Not everyone lives in a big city with a Piggly Wiggly a mile away ...


And if you have to feed two teenage boys. you will need two fridges.  My kids drink about a gallon of milk a day.  Basically at the beginning of the week I have on that is full of just milk (and a few beers for dad) By Friday it is empty.
...
HEY where the heck did my Beer go?!
 
2013-10-07 11:21:44 AM

proteus_b: Tillmaster: It means more current, actually, which is why the power cables on electric kettles warm up. Less voltage, though.

V = I R

R stays the same, divided V in 2. Seems like you get half the current.


Actually the motor has a certain power which is the same whether it is wired for 120V or 240V.
P=IV
If the supplied voltage drops by half the current has to double to produce the same power.
 
2013-10-07 11:34:04 AM

YoOjo: You know how in every TV thread there's that guy who says he doesn't have a TV?
*coughs*
I don't have a refrigerator or a freezer.
I don't eat out much and I don't spend hours cooking non-frozen non-ready meals. I eat fresh veg and pulses mainly, all of which I can keep unrefrigerated.
I don't eat dairy, don't take milk in my coffee and don't cook too much and freeze the leftovers.
I shop in bulk but top up with a piece of broccoli or whatever daily, from a dedicated fruit and veg store that's cheaper than the supermarket (not everything is cheaper in supermarkets, seems to me it's mainly the sugary stuff that's dirt cheap).
I'm really not trying to be a hipster douche, I just don't run a fridge any more. I used to be pretty damn wealthy and had the whole kitchen bigger than the house I was born in and fridge bigger than my old bedroom... but where I am in life now, with my freak flag ran up the pole again, I'm happy enough living like this thanks.
I doubt it'll catch on, fridges are very convenient. One thing though, in the past I regularly bought too much fresh and threw out stuff that I'd optimistically bought thinking I could use. I don't get waste anymore, there's no fridge to forget I put things in.


That's cool.  I grow my own food 6 months of the year and don't have a grandma to teach me canning (incredibly freaked out about f--king it up and getting botulism, and keep missing the workshops 'round here).  So I made half a gallon of fresh salsa verde yesterday, and most of that's gonna get frozen.  With the fresh pesto and eggplant spread.

But if you're happy, that's cool.  More power to ya!
 
2013-10-07 11:37:04 AM

kth: lack of warmth: Re: butter I've been told it's safe to leave salted butter out, so I do, but I would love to find a cold butter peltier effect plate, plug it in, and it brings the butter temperature to something above refrigeration, something below room temp, because I like spreadable butter, but I do like colder butter.

I've worked in restaurants that only refrigerated mayo at night, and everyone who freaks out about room temp mayo has had it because it is an industry standard and accepted practice by the health board. I leave my butter out as long as it doesn't melt in the dish, and it is unsalted.

We have a butter bell for salted butter. It's a little crock that you put upside down in water.  Spreadable butter. Plus it's cute.

[static.yuppiechef.com image 660x440]

When we're cooking, we often forget to put the salted butter back in the fridge, we've never had an issue.


I really want this Polish pottery butter bell a local store has.  It's like $80 and amazing.

But until then I just keep the butter dish on the counter.  SO works in a bakery and we have roommates, so between fresh bread and hungry people we go through it pretty darn fast anyhow.  Except the few weeks during the summer when it was so damn hot the fans/dehumifier couldn't keep up and we would've had a puddle of butter.

/only miss AC about two weeks of the year
//easy enough to deal with
 
2013-10-07 12:23:53 PM

christ1: proteus_b: Tillmaster: It means more current, actually, which is why the power cables on electric kettles warm up. Less voltage, though.

V = I R

R stays the same, divided V in 2. Seems like you get half the current.

Actually the motor has a certain power which is the same whether it is wired for 120V or 240V.
P=IV
If the supplied voltage drops by half the current has to double to produce the same power.


You can't change current directly.

Current flow is governed by resistance and electrical potential (voltage).  Think of voltage as a pressure difference (i.e. height and gravity in an elevated water system, air or water pressure in a pneumatic or hydraulic system), and resistance as a measure of resistance to such pressure (narrow tubes, bends, shiat in the way, etc.).  In a water or air system, high-pressure through a narrow tube meets resistance until the tube bursts; in an electrical system, high voltage in a high resistance system will emit heat until the component breaks by overheating or just under electrical pressure (i.e. silicone diodes and microchips, even if cooled, just can't take extremely high voltages).

Current measures how much electricity actually moves.  With water, higher pressure causes water moving down a pipe with so much surface in the cross-section to move at higher speed; with electricity, higher voltage causes the same sort of thing.  Multiply the speed by the cross-section and you get a volume of water--or with electricity, multiply the current by the voltage and you get the amount of actual power delivered.

You can't just make shiat go faster.  Apply more pressure or widen the tubes.  A motor with 120V and 240V taps has enough windings to run on 240V, with another tap at a different point for the correct number of windings to run exactly the same on 120V.  The impedance characteristics of the motor with 240V on tap A are the same as with 120V on tap B; the motor acts sort of like a transformer (or an inductor, really).

Because copper is expensive, it's cheaper to just make the motor with the fewer windings and use a different transformer.  On the other hand, your motor needs to be large enough to dissipate the heat--a 5V motor with few windings might draw 48A of current at 5V (or 2A of current at 120V), but it's going to melt unless very large gauge wire is used.  A large, heavy 240V motor with plenty of windings on thin copper wire will run without heating up enough to damage itself.  Remember you need quite a lot of power to crank over that compressor.
 
2013-10-07 01:52:04 PM
I'm so sick of this myth that Europeans are so superior and they go to the market everyday to buy fresh vegetables. Every European city I've been to, the people eat like children (cheese sandwiches, baked beans, lots of pastries) and they don't really cook food (a visit to a local "super" market will make it clear that groceries are crappy and expensive). They eat out for most meals or buy microwavable stuff, and they certainly don't entertain very often in their home (if they do it's probably just a cheese plate). If you don't need ingredients, you don't need a fridge.

I live in a city (Philly) and I have a very large standalone fridge and a very small standalone freezer. My fridge has a lot of bulk food (meat and vegetables) in it because I don't want to drive to the supermarket everyday (yes I have to drive even though I live in a city because there are no good supermarkets here). We also have quite a lot of beer taking up an entire shelf in the fridge. I also need a wide fridge that can fit things like baking trays, since I make a lot of things from scratch. When people come over, I don't just pull out a bag of chips, I actually make a meal for them, so again I need the extra space. I really don't think any of the "enlightened" Europeans have the same issues.
 
2013-10-07 02:42:58 PM
I have 2 fridges both big and I have a large deep freeze (full large fridge size) that I don't use cause I don't cook much and can't afford to fill that bad boy up even if I knew what to buy
 
2013-10-07 03:12:03 PM
Because here in amurrica, the supermarkets are so far fraggin' away from where people live that they don't usually just stop and pick stuff up every day like they do in places like Japan and France. Of course in places like New York city it's possible (and convenient) to stop by bread shops and greengrocers and butcher shops to pick up fresh stuff every day because they may be on your way home, but in flyover country and many places on the west coast that isn't as much a reality.
Buy once a week or every other week (I shop once a month or more for frozen and canned, every two or three weeks for fresh stuff like milk and veggies, but I buy only for myself), and store it. For that schedule, you need space.
 
2013-10-07 11:25:09 PM
Cause bestbuy has 0% financing for 18 months....
 
2013-10-07 11:26:20 PM

rewind2846: Of course in places like New York city it's possible (and convenient) to stop by bread shops and greengrocers and butcher shops to pick up fresh stuff every day because they may be on your way home, but in flyover country and many places on the west coast that isn't as much a reality.


www.brettrush.com

This is Trader Joes on a "normal" day in some manhattan areas. Not exactly the easiest here to 'pop in and grab some milk. You are better off getting some grade D Malk at the bodega.
 
2013-10-07 11:32:10 PM

Persnickety: http://www.fsis.usda.gov/wps/portal/fsis/topics/food-safety-educatio n/ !ut/p/a1/rVHLbsIwEPyaHi2va_LwkSLxSNUgCBTIBZnESU2xExQX0X59nVQqVVUKSLFPq 5md3dnBMV7iWPODzLmRhea7uo7dNUzAJawHwZiRPozC58n4sdcDP3IsYfUPIaRX9p95Xbj Uv8AxjhNtSvOCV1klK5QU2ght7qCp9m-iarxsduIEJYVShf4GK0suihRVPBPm3cJmLXUqj rV2yXORikrmuqkSmdo5jHHuJB7iDvNQJwMf-cT1kNgAzSh3mev6OLjCutzu93HXGqgXOxq 8bN1Bc5-fewCxfxTSqDMMQgrjzm_CHxF-Ec5ntLIheieFwbQe0Y9mZOA8EBgSHN14uwuCt GVBBm0L3rctePsNSzWfK3-bqQV6nfpAnfLwMcuUWodP3U8mAinS/?1dmy¤t=true &urile=wcm%3apath%3a%2Ffsis-content%2Ffsis-questionable-content%2Ffood -safety%2Ffood-storage-preparation-and-handling%2Fct_index


Now THAT is a URL. Can anyone explain the length?
 
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