If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(The Atlantic)   Why do Americans have such large refrigerators?   (theatlantic.com) divider line 188
    More: Interesting, Americans, shelf lives, sustainable growth, Boston Scientific, refrigerators, family-owned  
•       •       •

13300 clicks; posted to Main » on 06 Oct 2013 at 3:25 PM (27 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



188 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | » | Last | Show all
 
2013-10-06 10:06:03 AM
All of that high fructose corn syrup juice has to go somewhere.
 
2013-10-06 10:07:28 AM
Beer storage.  Geez what a stupid question.
 
2013-10-06 10:12:18 AM
Why is everyone else's so puny?
 
2013-10-06 10:25:20 AM
Where else would you put all that food?

img.fark.net
 
2013-10-06 10:42:59 AM
They go along with our shopping habits.

www.kenrockwell.com
 
2013-10-06 10:43:22 AM
I'm guessing it's so they can keep a lot of things, or large things, cold?
 
2013-10-06 10:43:26 AM
Knew it, just another envirotard piece on how evil Americans are killing the planet.

Go take your puny little fridge someplace else.
 
2013-10-06 10:52:35 AM

LordZorch: Knew it, just another envirotard piece on how evil Americans are killing the planet.

Go take your puny little fridge someplace else.


You are bad at reading.
 
2013-10-06 11:36:14 AM
Americans don't want to go shopping (or eat out) every day.

/two person household.
//two fridges.
///total of ~34 cu. ft.
////both packed full.
 
2013-10-06 11:41:01 AM
The big draws in a home are in order:

1. Air Conditioning
2. Water heating
3. Lighting
4. Refrigeration.
5. Electronics

Your best bets to use little energy are use on demand hot water(natural gas), keep your AC set to as high as you can tolerate in the summer and as low in the winter, and go to bed shortly after the sun sets. Refrigeration is being outpaced by electronics for electrical usage due to efficient designs of the newer fridges.
 
2013-10-06 11:41:57 AM
Because I NEED 12lbs of mayo! OK?!
 
2013-10-06 11:59:03 AM
Because unlike Europeans, who tend to go shopping for fresh produce and meats every couple days or so, Americans buy a few weeks worth of food all at once, and we need the space to keep the food cold and fresh until we're ready to eat it.  That, and we don't eat the amount of fresh produce per day a lot of people in other countries do, so buying it every other day makes no fiscal sense.
 
vpb [TotalFark]
2013-10-06 12:03:52 PM
Because it costs less to buy things is larger quantities and it produces less packaging waste?
 
2013-10-06 12:13:00 PM

Mrbogey: The big draws in a home are in order:

1. Air Conditioning
2. Water heating
3. Lighting
4. Refrigeration.
5. Electronics

Your best bets to use little energy are use on demand hot water(natural gas), keep your AC set to as high as you can tolerate in the summer and as low in the winter, and go to bed shortly after the sun sets. Refrigeration is being outpaced by electronics for electrical usage due to efficient designs of the newer fridges.


Also, the gap between 2 and 3 is pretty wide, especially with CFLs.
 
2013-10-06 12:15:33 PM

vpb: Because it costs less to buy things is larger quantities and it produces less packaging waste?


Perhaps, but look at how much food waste Americans create, and you may question the strategy of buying 10 pounds of vegetables once a week and cramming them in the crisper until it can barely shut.
 
2013-10-06 12:15:40 PM

Mrbogey: use on demand hot water(natural gas),


Won't keep up with a proper shower unless you piggy back 2 of them for the shower only and they are astoundingly expensive to do your whole house. Low flow showers SUCKI have low flow dual flush toilets, low flow sinks, water and energy efficient dishwasher even the second shower is low flow but my shower I will not yield on. It flows heavily (so to speak)

Mrbogey: keep your AC set to as high as you can tolerate in the summer and as low in the winter,


Extra cold in winter to make up for the extra cold in summer!

Mrbogey: and go to bed shortly after the sun sets


BWAHAHAHA!

Mrbogey: Refrigeration is being outpaced by electronics


One new and one newish fridge (both BIG) because I get paid every 2 weeks and make one trip every payday. Seems about half of that space is taken by drinks

A fair portion of the electronics usage can be cut by turning off power at the surge protector Almost every gizmo uses power in standby mode these days. Assuming you don't care about the clock on these items. Also if necessary you can buy a remote control plugin to do this if your surge isn't easily accessible, this thing probably does use some power but far less than all the gear you just turned off.

CFL bulbs rock Get the yellowish/golden ones not the blueish/actinic white, ones no one needs THAT much contrast in their living room
 
2013-10-06 12:24:25 PM

Mrbogey: go to bed shortly after the sun sets


For a decent part of the year the sun sets before I'm even out of work.
 
2013-10-06 12:28:37 PM
One of the benefits of living where I used to live in Berkeley, in an older neighborhood, with mixed development and housing was that it was a very simple, quick, and pleasurable thing to walk to a corner market (10th of a mile), or walk to a butcher or bakery or cheese shop (1/2 mile), or walk, even to a supermarket (1/2 mile) to pick up fresh food for dinner.

The place was built for walking, especially because it had mixed development.

Where I exist now the whole city was designed around cars. Stores, offices, boutiques are all clustered in megacenters with enormous parking lots.  The closest "grocery" store is a Target about 3/4 mile away. The closest supermarket is a mile away.  There are no independent bakeries or butchers etc. within 10 miles.

I'd like to move back to a place with a good walkability score.
 
2013-10-06 12:30:41 PM

Sid_6.7: Mrbogey: go to bed shortly after the sun sets

For a decent part of the year the sun sets before I'm even out of work.


Go to work in the dark, go home in the dark. Truly the most depressing part of the year.
 
2013-10-06 12:35:07 PM
Is this one of those bullshiat HR questions?

/because the manholes are round
 
2013-10-06 12:35:14 PM

NewportBarGuy: Sid_6.7: Mrbogey: go to bed shortly after the sun sets

For a decent part of the year the sun sets before I'm even out of work.

Go to work in the dark, go home in the dark. Truly the most depressing part of the year.


I usually spend all day at work in the dark, too

/metaphorically speaking
 
vpb [TotalFark]
2013-10-06 12:58:58 PM

b0rscht: vpb: Because it costs less to buy things is larger quantities and it produces less packaging waste?

Perhaps, but look at how much food waste Americans create, and you may question the strategy of buying 10 pounds of vegetables once a week and cramming them in the crisper until it can barely shut.


That's silly.  Americans don't eat vegetables.
 
2013-10-06 01:17:47 PM
Because they're America's last ditch atomic blast shelters!

whatculture.com


/The REAL question should be:  Why do Americans have such large asses?
 
2013-10-06 01:19:52 PM
Because we can, duh.
 
2013-10-06 01:28:04 PM

RoyBatty: One of the benefits of living where I used to live in Berkeley, in an older neighborhood, with mixed development and housing was that it was a very simple, quick, and pleasurable thing to walk to a corner market (10th of a mile), or walk to a butcher or bakery or cheese shop (1/2 mile), or walk, even to a supermarket (1/2 mile) to pick up fresh food for dinner.

The place was built for walking, especially because it had mixed development.

Where I exist now the whole city was designed around cars. Stores, offices, boutiques are all clustered in megacenters with enormous parking lots.  The closest "grocery" store is a Target about 3/4 mile away. The closest supermarket is a mile away.  There are no independent bakeries or butchers etc. within 10 miles.

I'd like to move back to a place with a good walkability score.


It has been a LONG time since most americans lived that way.
 
2013-10-06 01:41:48 PM

namatad: RoyBatty: One of the benefits of living where I used to live in Berkeley, in an older neighborhood, with mixed development and housing was that it was a very simple, quick, and pleasurable thing to walk to a corner market (10th of a mile), or walk to a butcher or bakery or cheese shop (1/2 mile), or walk, even to a supermarket (1/2 mile) to pick up fresh food for dinner.

The place was built for walking, especially because it had mixed development.

Where I exist now the whole city was designed around cars. Stores, offices, boutiques are all clustered in megacenters with enormous parking lots.  The closest "grocery" store is a Target about 3/4 mile away. The closest supermarket is a mile away.  There are no independent bakeries or butchers etc. within 10 miles.

I'd like to move back to a place with a good walkability score.

It has been a LONG time since most americans lived that way.


I understand, but I am told that because of zoning laws outlawing mixed development, and because of how developers place parking lots in front of a store instead of in the rear which makes it that much more difficult to build a streetside business community.

It was very new to me when I moved to Berkeley from a very suburban part of LA, but it was great.

I also lived 1/2 mile uphill from one BART station and 3/4 mile downhill from another BART station which also turned out to be terribly wonderful luck.
 
2013-10-06 01:47:26 PM
Kind of interesting -- since I had never considered that point before.

But then, back decades ago, when Europeans were driving small, fuel efficient cars, relying on multi-speed transmissions Americans were buying 4 speed machines the size of ships with massive engines that relied on HORSEPOWER.

I still recall a few family cars from when I was a kid -- not SUV's but with enough room inside to rattle around in. Trunks big enough to move into as an apartment.

I still haven't figured out the difference in household current, though, from them to us. We use 110 and many European nations use -- what -- 210?

The American Culture has been heavily influenced by marketing strategies, designed to get you to pay more in the long run. I think we came up with the concept of 'planned obsolescence' first -- mainly in the auto industry. That started the buying a new car every year trend.

Later, we would move it into other products so companies could sell more and we developed massive land fills and scrap yards.

Of course, now, we've found a way to make major bucks off recycling. We've even been known to buy garbage from other nations to process through our recycling plants for major bucks.

Rising prices on nearly everything food related mean most folks tend to buy in bulk. It's cheaper in the long run. Plus, it seems that no matter which way you turn, there's some excuse to raise the price of food.

Look at the alcohol fuel trend and the corn crop and the major results from that. Not much in fuel savings, but a huge boon to investors in corn and food products. Soon you'll need to take out a loan to buy a beef roast.

There's a lot of American household items which are designed bigger than in many European nations. I've seen stoves in kitchens that basically take up 1/4 of the available space. Sinks which would look appropriate in restaurant kitchens and counters packed with enough electronic cooking devices to start a store.

You can't watch TV without having a car commercial at every station break. Infomercials have popped up to sell you tons of cheap, not very durable products. That big screen TV of yours cost three times as much as the old tube TV and will last about half as long, but it's now getting harder to buy the analogue version.

Then we have the 'grab and go' generations, who no longer do much actual home cooking, preferring to buy prepared meals and foods from the store. That's come about due to folks having to work more and from basic free enterprise advertising. Why spend an hour making a meal when your free time is valuable and you can have one in 15 minutes? Granted, it may have some of the ingredients in it from antifreeze to sawdust, but at levels the FDA says will not hurt you.

Of course, now we're going backwards, creating reliability and dependability. Car engines last longer than 64,000 miles and most tires now get three times the previous mileage.

Though, you now get to pay three times as much.
 
2013-10-06 02:20:51 PM

Riche: Because they're America's last ditch atomic blast shelters!

[whatculture.com image 504x250]


/The REAL question should be:  Why do Americans have such large asses?


That would be to wedge yourself into the fridge so you don't get hurt when it lands.
 
2013-10-06 02:30:52 PM

DrPainMD: Americans don't want to go shopping (or eat out) every day.

/two person household.
//two fridges.
///total of ~34 cu. ft.
////both packed full.


Same here..  both full size though.. Shops at Costco.

/uses a food saver vac... bought at Costco
 
2013-10-06 02:45:24 PM

Mrbogey: Your best bets to use little energy are use on demand hot water(natural gas).


slight threadjack:

I remember reading a study that came out years ago about water conservation and the hope that as more households were adopting the on-demand water heaters there would be a noticeable decline in water consumption.

but based on their observations, they found that water consumption didn't decrease, and in some cases, it actually increased in homes were the technology was present.

people would turn the shower on (which is 'instantly' hot) yet they would still go about their routine as if they were waiting for hot water to reach the shower-head (brush their teeth, get undressed...)

and then on the other end, people were actually taking longer showers because they were never running out of hot water (especially in multiple-persons households).

so apparently it is the behavior of the consumer that needs to adopt to the 'new' technology.

/closely related is the effect of having to flush a low-flow toilet more than once to remove solid waste
//"Hashaway!"

threadjack over
 
2013-10-06 02:53:18 PM

calbert: Mrbogey: Your best bets to use little energy are use on demand hot water(natural gas).

slight threadjack:

I remember reading a study that came out years ago about water conservation and the hope that as more households were adopting the on-demand water heaters there would be a noticeable decline in water consumption.

but based on their observations, they found that water consumption didn't decrease, and in some cases, it actually increased in homes were the technology was present.

people would turn the shower on (which is 'instantly' hot) yet they would still go about their routine as if they were waiting for hot water to reach the shower-head (brush their teeth, get undressed...)

and then on the other end, people were actually taking longer showers because they were never running out of hot water (especially in multiple-persons households).

so apparently it is the behavior of the consumer that needs to adopt to the 'new' technology.

/closely related is the effect of having to flush a low-flow toilet more than once to remove solid waste
//"Hashaway!"

threadjack over


unintended consequences are wonderful
places which install water metering to generate more revenue.
unintended consequence? water usage goes down and revenue goes down.

this has been true for pretty much every "tragedy of the commons" situation
 
2013-10-06 02:58:27 PM
It's so we can spend less energy driving to the store less often.
Have larger containers of food to use less packaging.
Stores can move larger volumes of food at a time requiring only one large building instead of three smaller ones.

Anything else?
 
2013-10-06 03:11:24 PM
I blame the '85 Bears
 
2013-10-06 03:20:56 PM

jaylectricity: It's so we can spend less energy driving to the store less often.
Have larger containers of food to use less packaging.
Stores can move larger volumes of food at a time requiring only one large building instead of three smaller ones.

Anything else?


better quality control, better pricing, better selection, the list goes on and on.
you also left out, not having to drive/walk to 12 different stores to get everything that you needed.
Butcher, baker, produce, dry goods, liquor, drug store, hardware store, the list goes on and on.

The myth of the small local store continues to this day.
It ignores things like: shiat used to cost a lot more, store hours were terrible, local stores wouldn't sell to those people, etc, etc.

/I would kill for a local bakery that had REAL french bread, not that american crap we call french bread.
 
2013-10-06 03:25:59 PM
Because Fark you, I am an American and I buy what I want, that's why!
 
2013-10-06 03:27:42 PM

Maul555: Because Fark you, I am an American and I buy what I want, that's why!


Came for this...
 
2013-10-06 03:28:31 PM

Coco LaFemme: Because unlike Europeans, who tend to go shopping for fresh produce and meats every couple days or so, Americans buy a few weeks worth of food all at once, and we need the space to keep the food cold and fresh until we're ready to eat it.  That, and we don't eat the amount of fresh produce per day a lot of people in other countries do, so buying it every other day makes no fiscal sense.


These kinds of argument would make sense, until you look at how much food we throw away from our fridge.
 
2013-10-06 03:30:07 PM
The fact that we put perishable food in the refrigerator suggests that we still remember the refrigeration's most basic advantage: to prevent food from spoiling before we consume it.


www.reactionface.info
 
2013-10-06 03:30:17 PM
I have only one really large fridge in my house. The ones in the garage are normal sized. You're welcome, Earth.
 
2013-10-06 03:32:18 PM
We got rid of our refrigerator last year to make room for a wood-burning stove.

Honestly, when we buy meat and poultry we use it that day or donate it to the local halfway house. Anything else just seems... incredibly non-green.
 
2013-10-06 03:32:25 PM

Maul555: Because Fark you, I am an American and I buy what I want, that's why!

 
2013-10-06 03:32:29 PM
Because Obama is trying to give away as much as he can to the poors.
 
2013-10-06 03:34:11 PM
Why do Americans have such large refrigerators?
Dead hooker storage.
 
2013-10-06 03:35:25 PM

Fallout Boy: Coco LaFemme: Because unlike Europeans, who tend to go shopping for fresh produce and meats every couple days or so, Americans buy a few weeks worth of food all at once, and we need the space to keep the food cold and fresh until we're ready to eat it.  That, and we don't eat the amount of fresh produce per day a lot of people in other countries do, so buying it every other day makes no fiscal sense.

These kinds of argument would make sense, until you look at how much food we throw away from our fridge.


I can't speak for other people, but my boyfriend and I are very good about buying only what we know we'll eat in the time between grocery shopping runs.  That way we don't have a lot of spoilage or food that ends up uneaten.  Also, I make a lot of casseroles that used up leftovers, so food that otherwise would have gone uneaten or gone bad before we ate it, gets re-purposed.
 
2013-10-06 03:36:24 PM

NewportBarGuy: Because I NEED 12lbs of mayo! OK?!


LIAR!!

A REAL American would know that Mayo is sold in liquid measurements so you might have 12 gallons of mayo.  At 1.6 lbs. per gallon the weight conversion on this would be 19.2 lbs.  And since 12 gallons of mayo only takes up ~2 cubic feet, you can fit FAR more of that in your 34 FT3fridge.

So take a hike you poser!
 
2013-10-06 03:37:52 PM
 
2013-10-06 03:39:06 PM
I live on and off in South America(Colombia) and I can tell you from my travels all over South America, and in the US.  The corner store is generally a myth.

Corner stores cost more, have inferior product, and just because the carrots have dirty still on them do not warrant the price being double for the convenience.

I eat a large amount of vegetables, and I go shopping every two weeks.

My Colombian wife spent most of her free time going to the tienda to buy two eggs, a bag of milk, and a few slices of bread, all at outrageous prices.

I finally sat down with her and showed her how she could save time and money by planning a shopping trip, and sure the guy in the supermarket might not be as friendly as the tienda(who robs the local residents blind) but you saved hours and pesos.
 
2013-10-06 03:40:23 PM

Riche: Because they're America's last ditch atomic blast shelters!

[whatculture.com image 504x250]


/The REAL question should be:  Why do Americans have such large asses?


winner
 
2013-10-06 03:41:26 PM
You know what they say about a guy with a big fridge...
 
2013-10-06 03:41:57 PM
craighamar.com

Because if refrigerators weren't so big, this guy might have been nicknamed "The Dishwasher". And that's just wrong.
 
Displayed 50 of 188 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report