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(Gizmodo)   Meet DARPA'S newest robot "Cheetah" with a top speed of 28 mph. Be afraid. Be very afraid. (w/video)   (gizmodo.com) divider line 10
    More: Cool, DARPA, cheetahs, robots, Boston Dynamics  
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5041 clicks; posted to Geek » on 04 Oct 2013 at 12:06 PM (46 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-10-04 10:53:48 AM
2 votes:
Cheetah was the previous version that is hard-wired to power. This version is named Wildcat, max speed 16 mph.
2013-10-04 04:54:00 PM
1 votes:

give me doughnuts: ThisIsntMe: The Madd Mann: ThisIsntMe: Explain to me again why we aren't just breeding horses for this shiat?

The point is improvement. When they were first invented, the automobile was crap. It was slow, it was weak, it took a mechanical genius to operate, they were terrible. But while machines can be improved far beyond their original capabilities, a horse will always be limited by its inherent... horsiness.

This is what we have now. What do you think we'll have in 15 years?

A mechanical horse that needs fuel a mechanic and spare parts and can't breed.

It can sit on a shelf for a couple of years, be partially disassembled, stuck in a box, and air-dropped.

You want to try that with a horse?


With the right armor plating, it can also take a few more bullets than a real horse and won't get spooked. Once initial programming of the original is done, there's no training required; They'll all work with the same efficiency.

Horses DO need fuel, but horses can't turn sunlight into fuel. Eventually, a quadruped robot will be self-sustaining. No fuel stops. It just soaks up sunlight and converts it to power.

Horses also take time to raise and breed. These robots will some day be mass-produced. They'll be able to drop hundreds of them in the field at a moment's notice.

It can't be bargained with. It can't be reasoned with. It doesn't feel pity, or remorse, or fear. And it absolutely will not stop, ever, until you are dead.
2013-10-04 03:41:51 PM
1 votes:

Memoryalpha: Krumet: Memoryalpha: The joints are vulnerable in the prototype.  They probably still will be in the production model.  Unless it's got a quick method of righting itself after it's been knocked over or tripped it should still be fairly simple to take one of these things out even with melee weapons.  Still I would prefer to keep some distance.  Trip it up, entangle it's legs and then set the farker on fire and hope any ammo or fuel it carries cooks off and does the rest of the job for you.  Remember this thing is not going to be a pet.  It's meant to be a weapons platform.  If you see one of these things on American soil and you can't run, do anything you can to destroy it.   The early models will be remotely controlled, so if possible booby trap the remains so that when the recovery team comes to get it, they are at the very least hurt but preferably killed.

Intrigued, newsletter, subscribe.

Amused, there isn't one, perhaps write your own?

Seriously though, yes it's pretty cool tech, however the kind of people who will be deploying and using this tech are just the types who shouldn't ever be allowed near it.  Think of the domestic applications not over seas.  Picture a pack of these things used to herd protesters into "free speech" zones or more likely out of them so they can be brutalized and arrested.  Instead of a pig who has a face and can be potentially identified on camera it's just an anonymous drone among a group of them, controlled by people who will have little to no conscience about anything that happens as a result of their actions.  The more layers between an action and a responsibility the more likely bad and worse things will happen.  This is a big part of the reason pigs hate to be recorded on camera when they abuse people.  It's just one step between them and what they've done being known and proven.  With remotely controlled drones there's another step.  Once they're autonomous there is an almost impenetrable layer between act and responsibility because they can just say it was a software glitch.  Yet the damage is done and no one will be held accountable for it.


Dude, no one has called cops "pigs" since the 70s.
2013-10-04 03:38:33 PM
1 votes:

ThisIsntMe: Explain to me again why we aren't just breeding horses for this shiat?


Horses tend to panic at gun fire. Or getting shot. Or having its legs blown off. Besides, this thing is awesome!
kab
2013-10-04 03:36:23 PM
1 votes:

ThisIsntMe: Explain to me again why we aren't just breeding horses for this shiat?


Said the guy when the first steam engine was announced.
2013-10-04 02:08:06 PM
1 votes:

ThisIsntMe: I'm glad tech ramps up that fast. And if this thing flew I'd agree with you. But even Auto manufacturers agreed you don't just recreate a four legged beast of burden. Only thing that can climb through terrain is something with legs. Unless they get something with legs that can traverse all-terrain at higher speeds than a horse they are wasting time and money.


This is a prototype. Anybody can tell the thing is basically an experiment to get the basic gait / leg motions down. It's legs have just enough range of motion to perform a basic gallop and that's it. Once that's perfect they can give it more agility. You seem to be suggesting that because the first iteration can't go 60 mph and have the agility of a tiger that it's stupid.
2013-10-04 01:36:16 PM
1 votes:

ThisIsntMe: Explain to me again why we aren't just breeding horses for this shiat?


The point is improvement. When they were first invented, the automobile was crap. It was slow, it was weak, it took a mechanical genius to operate, they were terrible. But while machines can be improved far beyond their original capabilities, a horse will always be limited by its inherent... horsiness.

This is what we have now. What do you think we'll have in 15 years?
2013-10-04 01:28:42 PM
1 votes:

ThisIsntMe: Explain to me again why we aren't just breeding horses for this shiat?


Horses need to be fed and kept healthy. A robot just needs a wrench and a mechanic familiar with its engineering. Plus people these days have an issue with sending horses into warzones.
2013-10-04 12:46:56 PM
1 votes:
The joints are vulnerable in the prototype.  They probably still will be in the production model.  Unless it's got a quick method of righting itself after it's been knocked over or tripped it should still be fairly simple to take one of these things out even with melee weapons.  Still I would prefer to keep some distance.  Trip it up, entangle it's legs and then set the farker on fire and hope any ammo or fuel it carries cooks off and does the rest of the job for you.  Remember this thing is not going to be a pet.  It's meant to be a weapons platform.  If you see one of these things on American soil and you can't run, do anything you can to destroy it.   The early models will be remotely controlled, so if possible booby trap the remains so that when the recovery team comes to get it, they are at the very least hurt but preferably killed.
2013-10-04 11:33:27 AM
1 votes:
Put in some super lithium batteries to keep it quiet, and this thing could be really awesome out in the field.
 
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