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(WTKR)   America's next aircraft carrier puts on a lot of weight with the installation of four 30-ton propellers. With 'Wasn't this a scene from Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade' pics   (wtkr.com) divider line 109
    More: Cool, USS Gerald R. Ford, nuclear-powered aircraft carrier, Ford Motor Co., telecommunications facility, Huntington Ingalls Industries  
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17709 clicks; posted to Main » on 04 Oct 2013 at 10:47 AM (28 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-10-04 06:13:49 AM
Waste of money. While old ships may need replacement and our Navy could use an additional 50 or more ships the Ford class is an expensive-uneeded upgrade to the Nimitz Class. No other country is now building or likely to build in the next 20 years any carrier as capable as the Nimitz class. We would probably be better served by building more of a smaller carrier design of about 65,000 to 70,000 tons. And instead of the America class (which does not even have a well deck)just more of the cheaper Wasp Class LHDs.
 
2013-10-04 06:25:37 AM
My soul is prepared, Doctor Jones... Is yours?!
 
2013-10-04 08:17:10 AM
each propeller spins to push the aircraft carrier through the water.


i.dailymail.co.uk
 
2013-10-04 09:35:20 AM
Too bad they didn't have a pneumatic wrench to tighten those bolts down. Guess the government shutdown precluded that.
 
2013-10-04 09:41:38 AM
"Installation of the propellers culminates more than 10 months of focused work by numerous trades in support of installing the underwater shafting"

I'll say.
 
2013-10-04 09:55:31 AM
"...bringing more than three years of structural erection work to a close..."


What a relief.
 
2013-10-04 10:36:12 AM
Am I the only one who thinks those look kinda small? The screw on my fast attack boat was about that size.
 
2013-10-04 10:42:18 AM

Dinki: Too bad they didn't have a pneumatic wrench to tighten those bolts down. Guess the government shutdown precluded that.


That is a torque wrench. I am pretty sure  the specs call for so many ft lbs of toque when bolting those things on instead of just  "use a pneumatic wrench".


Screw up the props and you pretty much screw up the whole ship as the French found out  when they put bad props on the Charles De Gaulle (AKA Ship of the Damned).

French Aircraft Carrier Charles de Gaulle

"During the night of 9 November 2000, in the Western Atlantic while en route toward Norfolk, Virginia, the port propeller broke and the ship had to return to Toulon to replace the faulty unit. The investigations that followed showed similar structural faults in the other propeller and in the spare propellers: bubbles in the one-piece copper-aluminium alloy propellers near the center. The fault was blamed on the supplier, Atlantic Industries, which had already gone bankrupt. To make matters worse, all documents relating to the design and fabrication of the propellers had been lost in a fire. As a temporary solution, the less advanced spare propellers of Clemenceau and Foch were used, limiting the maximum speed to 24 knots (44 km/h) instead of the contractual 27 knots (50 km/h).

On 5 March 2001, Charles de Gaulle went back to sea with two older propellers and sailed 25.2 knots (47 km/h) on her trials. Between July and October, Charles de Gaulle had to be refitted once more due to abnormal noises, as loud as 100 dB, near the starboard propeller, which had rendered the aft part of the ship uninhabitable."

 
2013-10-04 10:50:05 AM

UberDave: "...bringing more than three years of structural erection work to a close..."


What a relief.


Aren't you supposed to see a doctor after 6 hours or something?
 
2013-10-04 10:51:31 AM

blatz514: UberDave: "...bringing more than three years of structural erection work to a close..."


What a relief.

Aren't you supposed to see a doctor after 6 hours or something?


Preferably a female doctor.
 
2013-10-04 10:52:11 AM
I thought prop designs were classified ?
 
2013-10-04 10:52:43 AM
Yeah, sure they put all this design work into the propellers, but just watch, they're going to forget the headlight fluid.
 
2013-10-04 10:53:07 AM
i39.tinypic.com

No! NO! It's "righty-tighty, lefty-loosie!"
 
2013-10-04 10:53:34 AM
YAY outdated military doctrine!
 
2013-10-04 10:53:58 AM
Experienced welders with secret of better clearances are getting paid $12 to start down there.

/Talk about wage deflation.
//Those props aren't really that big, are they?
 
gja [TotalFark]
2013-10-04 10:54:35 AM

DarkSoulNoHope: blatz514: UberDave: "...bringing more than three years of structural erection work to a close..."


What a relief.

Aren't you supposed to see a doctor after 6 hours or something?

Preferably a female doctor.


So.....everyone went out back for a smoke after this?
 
2013-10-04 10:55:02 AM
After this job, the yard workers will being working on that Mongolian trebuchet contract.
 
2013-10-04 10:55:26 AM

Bslim: YAY outdated military doctrine!


Outdated? Only if a new world war breaks out.Then all bets are off anyway.
 
2013-10-04 10:55:28 AM
FTFA: At 21 feet in diameter, each propeller spins to push the aircraft carrier through the water.



It's a good thing they told us that or else i'd have thought they were just 4 giant fans.
 
2013-10-04 10:56:55 AM
I also hear it's stealthy and nearly invisible to radar...But at a 1100 feet long...it just needs to be, well invisible..I mean even Mr. Magoo could see it!
 
2013-10-04 10:57:01 AM
heh! how much does 120 tons of bronze even cost?
 
2013-10-04 10:58:11 AM

cig-mkr: I thought prop designs were classified ?


I think that's mainly just submarines.

There's not a whole lot of point in hiding the acoustic signature of an aircraft carrier.
 
2013-10-04 10:58:41 AM
I'd be rich if I could steal those propellers and sell them to the scrap yard.  Shoot, I could steal that whole carrier!  Who's gonna stop me?
 
2013-10-04 10:58:53 AM
FTA:
bla bla bla... the underwater shafting...   structural erection... something something
 
2013-10-04 10:59:39 AM
Good to know that mandatory spending covers ship construction but not the DC police
 
2013-10-04 11:01:54 AM
img.fark.net
 
2013-10-04 11:03:30 AM
img.fark.net

Why does it say "Front towards Ship"on de blades dere?

and/or

I wonder if they're going to safety wire those bolts so they don't back out?
 
2013-10-04 11:04:05 AM
No USS Gerald Ford propeller installation shot is complete without the workmen toppling down a stairwell.
 
2013-10-04 11:04:07 AM

mediablitz: Am I the only one who thinks those look kinda small? The screw on my fast attack boat was about that size.


I was surprised they were that small too. Guess the larger numbers make up for the size?
 
2013-10-04 11:05:04 AM
The second sentence was a wealth of information for anyone that doesn't know the function of propellers on a boat.
 
2013-10-04 11:06:19 AM

Nana's Vibrator: I'd be rich if I could steal those propellers and sell them to the scrap yard.  Shoot, I could steal that whole carrier!  Who's gonna stop me?


Say hello to the Marine detachment for me please.
 
2013-10-04 11:06:23 AM

hasty ambush: Waste of money. While old ships may need replacement and our Navy could use an additional 50 or more ships the Ford class is an expensive-uneeded upgrade to the Nimitz Class. No other country is now building or likely to build in the next 20 years any carrier as capable as the Nimitz class. We would probably be better served by building more of a smaller carrier design of about 65,000 to 70,000 tons. And instead of the America class (which does not even have a well deck)just more of the cheaper Wasp Class LHDs.


Why do you hate America? How are we supposed to engage in very expensive, very pointless foreign wars without being able to project force?
 
2013-10-04 11:06:58 AM

Headso: heh! how much does 120 tons of bronze even cost?


I had to look. I'm basing it off $5/lb. (Some sites saying between $3-$8/lb)
$300k per prop.

But, being the government, i'm sure they paid $20/lb.
 
2013-10-04 11:07:27 AM

UberDave: "...bringing more than three years of structural erection work to a close..."


What a relief.


Indeed.

Doesn't the box say call your doctor after 4 hours though?
 
2013-10-04 11:09:44 AM
 
2013-10-04 11:09:47 AM
Propellers on an aircraft carrier? Darn, I was hoping it it was going to be one of these:

cdnimg.visualizeus.com
 
2013-10-04 11:10:12 AM
is it just me or is the author using a disproportionate amount of certain type of verbs and nouns?

shafting, erection, blades,  tight tolerances, bronze, rigging, piping
 
2013-10-04 11:10:19 AM
Is there a specific reason why they're made of bronze? Less likely to rust? Stress and warping resistance? Something else?
 
2013-10-04 11:10:59 AM

stratagos: Good to know that mandatory spending covers ship construction but not the DC police


Perhaps DC police should obtain multi-year contracts in advance and outsource to contractors.

It's apples and oranges, but thanks for playing.
 
2013-10-04 11:12:03 AM
A smaller propeller is a good thing.  It means the naval architects did their jobs.
 
2013-10-04 11:12:46 AM

jaytkay: mediablitz: Am I the only one who thinks those look kinda small? The screw on my fast attack boat was about that size.

Yes, I thought so, too. Here's a big one.

[www.langhamindustries.co.uk image 500x505]
Stone Marine Propulsion has been designing and supplying marine propellers
since the screw propeller was first developed in the 19th Century...the company
has facilities to design and supply propellers with finished weights in excess of 100 tonnes


It's not the size that matters, it's the motion of the ocean?
 
2013-10-04 11:14:14 AM

cig-mkr: I thought prop designs were classified ?


Not on skimmers.
 
2013-10-04 11:16:17 AM

Eps05: Is there a specific reason why they're made of bronze? Less likely to rust? Stress and warping resistance? Something else?


Most ship props are made out of nickle aluminum bronze.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aluminium_bronze 

Aluminium bronzes are most valued for their higher strength and corrosion resistance as compared to other bronze alloys. These alloys are tarnish-resistant and show low rates of corrosion in atmospheric conditions, low oxidation rates at high temperatures, and low reactivity with sulfurous compounds and other exhaust products of combustion. They are also resistant to corrosion in sea water.
 
2013-10-04 11:17:55 AM

jaytkay: mediablitz: Am I the only one who thinks those look kinda small? The screw on my fast attack boat was about that size.

Yes, I thought so, too. Here's a big one.

[www.langhamindustries.co.uk image 500x505]
Stone Marine Propulsion has been designing and supplying marine propellers
since the screw propeller was first developed in the 19th Century...the company
has facilities to design and supply propellers with finished weights in excess of 100 tonnes


Conn-Sonar. Contact has one 6 bladed screw doing 0 rpm. Classified dry docked...
 
2013-10-04 11:18:58 AM
I'm kinda surprised that in the couple hundred years that screw-type propulsion has been used on ships, there hasn't been a more advanced system (less power loss to water resistance/quieter/lighter/etc) designed. I know engineers prefer simplicity, but do things like ramjets not work under water?
 
2013-10-04 11:21:19 AM

grinding_journalist: I'm kinda surprised that in the couple hundred years that screw-type propulsion has been used on ships, there hasn't been a more advanced system (less power loss to water resistance/quieter/lighter/etc) designed. I know engineers prefer simplicity, but do things like ramjets not work under water?


Sure they do, they are used all the time in jet skis and speed boats.  But jets don't reach peak efficiency until high speeds.  And this ship ain't going that fast.
 
2013-10-04 11:21:41 AM

mediablitz: cig-mkr: I thought prop designs were classified ?

Not on skimmers torpedo receptacles.


FTFY.
 
2013-10-04 11:21:43 AM

Eps05: Is there a specific reason why they're made of bronze? Less likely to rust? Stress and warping resistance? Something else?


Steel is stronger, but less flexible then bronze. For example; any piece of stainless steel longer than about 12 inches is prone to shattering when hit. That's why only cheap, trash swords are made out of stainless steel. But; I'm not sure even a high carbon prop wouldn't just shatter; not even going into the rust factor. Aluminum is probably too flexible. Copper is probably too flexible as well. I don't know about tin.
 
2013-10-04 11:23:09 AM

VoodooTaco: mediablitz: cig-mkr: I thought prop designs were classified ?

Not on skimmers torpedo receptacles.

FTFY.


I was going to just used the preferred "targets".
 
2013-10-04 11:23:10 AM
Well, shoot.

/clicked on story link, hoping for Avengers-style aircraft carrier
//leaves disappointed
 
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