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(BBC)   "Exercise 'can be as good as pills.'" Therefore, according to the symmetric property of equality, pills can be as good as exercise. So gimme my meds and move over on the couch   (bbc.co.uk) divider line 20
    More: Interesting, Stanford University School of Medicine, British Heart Foundation, active lifestyle, exercises, Harvard Medical School, British Medical Journal  
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1588 clicks; posted to Main » on 03 Oct 2013 at 2:37 PM (28 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



20 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-10-03 02:42:35 PM
Works better to treat depression than any pill, too. And the only side effect is looking sexier.

FTA: Experts stressed that patients should not ditch their drugs for exercise - rather, they should use both in tandem. Then they hopped in their expensive cars with "Pfizer" livery and drove off.
 
2013-10-03 02:51:27 PM
But then the first world might have to start exercising, so really this whole discussion is pointless.
 
2013-10-03 02:55:22 PM

J. Frank Parnell: Works better to treat depression than any pill, too. And the only side effect is looking sexier.

FTA: Experts stressed that patients should not ditch their drugs for exercise - rather, they should use both in tandem. Then they hopped in their expensive cars with "Pfizer" livery and drove off.


Yes, people should not ditch their drugs for exercise, they should use both until they have achieved the notable goal of no longer being obese. At that point a careful evaluation of drug treatments and their effectiveness should be undertaken.

The reason most people will never get taken off drug treatments is that they will never get healthy enough with diet and exercise, because by the time you start to have problems you are in your 40's or 50's and over a 100 pounds overweight. Losing that kind of weight takes more discipline and willpower then those people will ever have.
 
2013-10-03 02:56:39 PM
"Exercise 'can be as good as pills.'" Therefore, according to the symmetric property of equality, pills can be as good as exercise. So gimme my meds and move over on the couch

Are you trolling logicians subby?
 
2013-10-03 02:57:29 PM
This headline is simply grand
 
2013-10-03 02:59:03 PM

Slaves2Darkness: J. Frank Parnell: Works better to treat depression than any pill, too. And the only side effect is looking sexier.

FTA: Experts stressed that patients should not ditch their drugs for exercise - rather, they should use both in tandem. Then they hopped in their expensive cars with "Pfizer" livery and drove off.

Yes, people should not ditch their drugs for exercise, they should use both until they have achieved the notable goal of no longer being obese. At that point a careful evaluation of drug treatments and their effectiveness should be undertaken.

The reason most people will never get taken off drug treatments is that they will never get healthy enough with diet and exercise, because by the time you start to have problems you are in your 40's or 50's and over a 100 pounds overweight. Losing that kind of weight takes more discipline and willpower then those people will ever have.


Exactly.  It is a great goal to be off medications, and quite achievable for many people, but the responsible way to do this is to exercise while on medication and to sustain that exercise long enough until underlying symptoms dissipate.  Then you can talk about reducing/removing medication.

There are also some people who simply have to be on medication, regardless of their exercise level, because of heart problems unrelated to being overweight or having a poor diet.  For example, if you have a bad heart valve and get valve replacement, you might have to be on blood thinners for the rest of your life.  Better than getting a stroke though!
 
2013-10-03 03:05:36 PM

Slaves2Darkness: J. Frank Parnell: Works better to treat depression than any pill, too. And the only side effect is looking sexier.

FTA: Experts stressed that patients should not ditch their drugs for exercise - rather, they should use both in tandem. Then they hopped in their expensive cars with "Pfizer" livery and drove off.

Yes, people should not ditch their drugs for exercise, they should use both until they have achieved the notable goal of no longer being obese. At that point a careful evaluation of drug treatments and their effectiveness should be undertaken.

The reason most people will never get taken off drug treatments is that they will never get healthy enough with diet and exercise, because by the time you start to have problems you are in your 40's or 50's and over a 100 pounds overweight. Losing that kind of weight takes more discipline and willpower then those people will ever have.


It doesn't take a whole lot of discipline or willpower. It just takes being conscious of your choices and how they affect your body. The problem is that it takes a long term change to do that. What people want now is instant results, and when they don't get that biggest loser type drop every week they give up.
 
2013-10-03 03:08:49 PM
The contrapositive frowns on your shenanigans.
 
2013-10-03 03:23:53 PM
There was an Artie Lang bit a while bcak where a personal trainer said exercise feels better than heroin,and Artie called him on it..
/heh.
 
2013-10-03 03:45:41 PM

J. Frank Parnell: Works better to treat depression than any pill, too. And the only side effect is looking sexier.

FTA: Experts stressed that patients should not ditch their drugs for exercise - rather, they should use both in tandem. Then they hopped in their expensive cars with "Pfizer" livery and drove off.


I totally agree with this. I've had bouts of (diagnosed) clinical depression and the happy pills they gave me never seemed to do much for me. A friend suggested starting an exercise regimen with him would help me get out of it once and after a week or so, I felt utterly great emotionally. Haven't stopped since and haven't been depressed either.
 
2013-10-03 03:54:19 PM

Slaves2Darkness: J. Frank Parnell: Works better to treat depression than any pill, too. And the only side effect is looking sexier.

FTA: Experts stressed that patients should not ditch their drugs for exercise - rather, they should use both in tandem. Then they hopped in their expensive cars with "Pfizer" livery and drove off.

Yes, people should not ditch their drugs for exercise, they should use both until they have achieved the notable goal of no longer being obese. At that point a careful evaluation of drug treatments and their effectiveness should be undertaken.

The reason most people will never get taken off drug treatments is that they will never get healthy enough with diet and exercise, because by the time you start to have problems you are in your 40's or 50's and over a 100 pounds overweight. Losing that kind of weight takes more discipline and willpower then those people will ever have.


And time.  Time I think is the most difficult thing to find to exercise ON A REGULAR BASIS.  If you work 8 hours a day and have 1-2 hours of commute; that can consume a ton of energy even if you have a sedentary job.  Assuming you get 6-8 hours of sleep, that leaves you with 6-9 hours to do everything else, and that isn't necessarily 6-9 hour time blocks, it will be divided into blocks of time that don't make it easy to exercise.  Want to eat healthy too, well that requires cooking, take another hour.  You will need to shower once, maybe twice, change clothes and maybe need to commute to a gym, scratch another hour. Laundry, cleaning the house, dishes, etc. Kids? delete the rest of your time and energy.  You may have time on the weekends, but does working out one hour once a week really have that big of an impact?

I like to watch people point to shows like "the biggest loser" as a motivational way to get people to lose weight, and laugh.  I think everyone could benefit from having three months off work to do nothing but exercise, learn to cook and eat healthy; but that is not going to happen.  They have even had 'winners' who when they left the environment of the show, fell into old habits and plumped right back up again.

I am overweight and struggling to lose it; I would love to spend an hour on the elliptical in my house, but my schedule doesn't permit it.  I tracked my schedule and sent it to my brother (navy guy) since he kept saying 'you need to make the time', only way he could find time was to cut hours out of sleep.

I think if we could find a way to relax/decrease the amount of time we all need to be 'at work', that could help solve our obesity problem in this country.
 
2013-10-03 04:09:04 PM

J. Frank Parnell: Works better to treat depression than any pill, too. And the only side effect is looking sexier.

FTA: Experts stressed that patients should not ditch their drugs for exercise - rather, they should use both in tandem. Then they hopped in their expensive cars with "Pfizer" livery and drove off.


What sucks is I seem to be the one person who doesn't get any type of mood boost from exercise. And it's not because I haven't done it long enough, because I once did about 1-2 hours of fairly intense cardio 5 days a week for three months as part of rehearsal for a play. All I felt was sweaty and disappointed at my lack of mood improvement.

I mean, I was in better shape, but I didn't seem to get any endorphins from it at all.
 
2013-10-03 04:26:19 PM

Chinchillazilla: I mean, I was in better shape, but I didn't seem to get any endorphins from it at all.


Lifting weights is better for endorphin rushes. The mythical 'runners high' from cardio is elusive to lots of people.

I generally just find my head is clearer and i'm not as grumpy after 30 mins of cardio, which is good enough for me.
 
2013-10-03 04:29:06 PM

Chinchillazilla: J. Frank Parnell: Works better to treat depression than any pill, too. And the only side effect is looking sexier.

FTA: Experts stressed that patients should not ditch their drugs for exercise - rather, they should use both in tandem. Then they hopped in their expensive cars with "Pfizer" livery and drove off.

What sucks is I seem to be the one person who doesn't get any type of mood boost from exercise.


Count me as another one like this. I've never enjoyed exercise. I'm not fat, but that's due more to healthy eating and genes than it is any effort on my part.

Some people get ecstatic, I just get tired and sore.
 
2013-10-03 04:32:40 PM

Chinchillazilla: J. Frank Parnell: Works better to treat depression than any pill, too. And the only side effect is looking sexier.

FTA: Experts stressed that patients should not ditch their drugs for exercise - rather, they should use both in tandem. Then they hopped in their expensive cars with "Pfizer" livery and drove off.

What sucks is I seem to be the one person who doesn't get any type of mood boost from exercise. And it's not because I haven't done it long enough, because I once did about 1-2 hours of fairly intense cardio 5 days a week for three months as part of rehearsal for a play. All I felt was sweaty and disappointed at my lack of mood improvement.

I mean, I was in better shape, but I didn't seem to get any endorphins from it at all.


It might have been the reason you were working out.  If you felt you were working out for the play (is that work or a hobby?) then you may have been robbed of the 'sense of accomplishment" from working out, since you weren't working out because you wanted to, rather for something/someone else because you had to.

if you had a crappy day and chose to work out, you can say "at least I worked out today" as opposed to "i had a crappy day and I HAD to workout on top of it."
 
2013-10-03 04:37:13 PM

PirateKing: Chinchillazilla: J. Frank Parnell: Works better to treat depression than any pill, too. And the only side effect is looking sexier.

FTA: Experts stressed that patients should not ditch their drugs for exercise - rather, they should use both in tandem. Then they hopped in their expensive cars with "Pfizer" livery and drove off.

What sucks is I seem to be the one person who doesn't get any type of mood boost from exercise.

Count me as another one like this. I've never enjoyed exercise. I'm not fat, but that's due more to healthy eating and genes than it is any effort on my part.

Some people get ecstatic, I just get tired and sore.


i.imgur.com
 
2013-10-03 07:11:16 PM
Headline makes perfect sense to me.

I don't get the pill hate. If pills work, what's wrong with them? (If they don't work, get with making better pills already.)

Exercise is nasty (don't say find something you enjoy, I enjoy not exercising) whereas pills are no trouble at all to take.

If you'd rather spend time at the gym, good for you. Or maybe you love running, congratulations for enjoying a socially approved activity. Doesn't mean everyone else is like you though, and it would actually seem quite a lot of people do not enjoy exercise. Imagine being told having your ass caned with a birch whip is good for you, and that you should spend at least 45 minutes doing it three or more times a week. You'd probably rather the pills too. (Then again some people would also pay extra for a good caning - it takes all kinds.)
 
2013-10-03 08:44:35 PM

PirateKing: What sucks is I seem to be the one person who doesn't get any type of mood boost from exercise.

Count me as another one like this. I've never enjoyed exercise. I'm not fat, but that's due more to healthy eating and genes than it is any effort on my part.


WHOOHOO! I'm not alone!

I have NEVER gotten any sort of emotional boost. On the contrary I often feel depressed or like crying for no reason after a workout.

My exercise instructor says "Listen to your body".
My body says "Knock this shiat off and get me some cake!".
 
2013-10-04 12:11:33 AM
Exercise works well to ease depressive symptoms in normal people and those with mild depression.  Moderate to severe depression? Go fark yourself.  You don't want pills? Don't take them.  Don't piss all over those that do.  If they have no side effects, who exactly are they hurting? Not themselves, and certainly not you.  Sometimes taking medication is the only thing helping you get out of bed to make the lifestyle changes, including exercise, that will help symptoms.  They may be able to get off meds after some time, some never will.  Quit judging people for doing what they see is best for their bodies, and to any one within ear shot as well.  No one asked you.  And you make them feel like shiat when they already feel like shiat.  That's some encouragement right there.  We are told to respect a woman's right to choose abortion, and are also told to keep any other opinions on the matter to ourselves.  But wanna take Celexa? Apparently that's everyone else's business.  It really just comes down to manners.  Do you like it when people make you feel like shiat when they really don't even gain anything by making their statement? No.  So don't do it to them.  That's a pre-school level lesson.
 
2013-10-04 06:56:49 AM

J. Frank Parnell: Chinchillazilla: I mean, I was in better shape, but I didn't seem to get any endorphins from it at all.

Lifting weights is better for endorphin rushes. The mythical 'runners high' from cardio is elusive to lots of people.

I generally just find my head is clearer and i'm not as grumpy after 30 mins of cardio, which is good enough for me.


I find it's a lot more satisfying when I can throw another 10lbs on the bar than to say I ran that extra quarter mile. But it's all in your head anyway.
 
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