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(Miami Herald)   The Florida Dept of Corrections awarded a five-year, $1.2B contract to provide medical care for thousands of state prisoners to a company that was sued 660 times for malpractice in the past five years   (miamiherald.com ) divider line
    More: Florida, Florida Department of Corrections, Florida state prisons, health cares, confidential settlements, malpractice, BSO, KY Jelly, Broward Sheriff's Office  
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2478 clicks; posted to Main » on 03 Oct 2013 at 2:21 PM (2 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-10-03 03:19:14 PM  
4 votes:
The county commissioners hired a private company to run our local county jail about 20 years ago. Before they took over it was rare that an inmate died in the county jail, and lawsuits were rare. The company (CCA) took over and within five years we were losing an average of two dead inmates a year, including a couple of people in jail for not paying traffic fines on time.
Remember Martin Anderson, the black kid killed in the boot camp when the jailers repeatedly broke ammonia tablets in his face? Same place.

What we found out is what the rest of the state is going to find out very soon after this latest phony attempt to save money by privatizing the prisons----it will cost the taxpayer roughly double. The private companies are for profit companies and have negotiated a contract. The only way to increase their profits is to cut costs. Cutting costs in health care means reduced care, which leads directly to major problems, then death. Major problems and death = lawsuits and high dollar settlements. Locally we had: 1) inmates take control of the jail's dispensary during a hurricane which ended up with a nurse being shot ending up in a major settlement against the county 2) The Martin Anderson mess, settled by the state for
five million before it went to court 3) a man who died because he was forbidden his medicine by some quack nurse, with an unknown settlement 4) a man who died from an extacy overdose who was told that he was faking it, with an unknown settlement.

They finally got rid of the CCA when they found that four of the five county commissioners had been given overseas vacation packages and were being taken nearly once a month to play golf all across the USA at prestigious golf courses.
And as soon as they were gone the deaths stopped and the lawsuits went back to almost nothing.

/a curse on Rick Scott. He is like a natural disaster for Florida, it's going to take us years to recover from him and his overwhelming corruption
2013-10-03 03:05:12 PM  
2 votes:

Cataholic: blazemongr: Is that higher than usual?

There are probably anywhere from 80,000 to 100,000 medical malpractice lawsuits in the US in any given year.  These guys have had a total of 660 suits over the last five years which would be on par with any major hospital group in a major US city.

You may return to your regularly scheduled outrage.



Try 15,000-19,000 med-mal lawsuits per year.

In 2010, the state with the highest case rate, New York, had a TOTAL of 3,861 cases out of a population of 19.4 million. I'm pretty sure the state of New York has more than six major hospital groups.

/google is your friend
//unless you're making shiat up
///slashies
2013-10-03 02:41:15 PM  
2 votes:
Early on Aug. 9, Fields "felt his intestines escaping from his rectum." Fellow inmates begged Corizon's staff to take him to the hospital. Instead, nurse Bettie Joyce Allen "obtained some K-Y Jelly, and pushed the intestines back in," the records say. Hours later, at a local hospital, doctors found an abscess compressing his spine.

A jury awarded Fields $1.2 million in 2011 after finding Corizon solely responsible for what happened.
2013-10-03 02:29:56 PM  
2 votes:
I'll just point out the obvious
km.eduvate.co.uk
2013-10-03 02:26:00 PM  
2 votes:
It's the Free Market TM at work!

/curious what the politician who runs the Florida DOC is hoping for?
//either lowest cost, best bribes, or more dead prisoners (or all three)
2013-10-03 09:06:25 PM  
1 vote:

HairBolus: Early on Aug. 9, Fields "felt his intestines escaping from his rectum." Fellow inmates begged Corizon's staff to take him to the hospital. Instead, nurse Bettie Joyce Allen "obtained some K-Y Jelly, and pushed the intestines back in," the records say. Hours later, at a local hospital, doctors found an abscess compressing his spine.

A jury awarded Fields $1.2 million in 2011 after finding Corizon solely responsible for what happened.


Unacceptable. Period.

Arkansas' contract with Corizon expires at the end of this year. From what I have seen, Corizon provides better medical care to our population than did CMS, who was acquired by Corizon a year or two ago. Not that I would use them on the outside, but that the care has improved somewhat. Of course, at my particular facility, our medical staff is much better than some of the others around the state that I have had to deal with. The treatment protocols probably vary from state to state and region to region, but just the professionalism and training that the medical staff has makes a world of difference.
Effective Jan. 1, CCS will become the provider for Arkansas inmates. I hope their care improves further. I have been in corrections for a while now, and have seen some horrible care (namely from CMS). I am of the mind that if society locks away an individual, then they are also responsible for that individual's care. And that includes medical/mental health care. There will always be inmates that try to game the system, but you still take care of them. Their job might be to act criminally, a medical professional's job is to provide medical care to anyone who walks through your door, regardless of past crimes.

CSB:
While working at a men's unit, a CMS nurse accused me of lying to her about an inmate pissing blood. Inmate had a serious infection causing him extreme pain and difficulty urinating. The nurse accused the inmate of poking or cutting himself on the dick while urinating. I was ordered by the Lt. to observe the inmate while urinating into a sample cup. Turned the blood filled sample over to the nurse and she accused me of both lying to her and providing the inmate with an object so that he could cut himself. She refused to accept that inmates ever got sick and was a terrible person in general. The inmate was finally provided the treatment he needed when (on a night shift) I found him in the floor in agony. A trip to the ER in an ambulance (all paid for by CMS, the motherfarkers) got him squared away. I got a little ass chewing from the nurse, but the Lt. had my back. She retired soon after and hopefully died a horrible death.
2013-10-03 05:19:45 PM  
1 vote:
It is incredible that we have privatized prisons, and now, their medical facility.

Prisons for profit is a horrible thing.  It requires a product.

Publicly-managed prisons hope for less product.

This is horrible.

/This is capitalism at its near-worst.
2013-10-03 03:13:35 PM  
1 vote:
So? People who have been to jail never amount to anything.

blackcoffeepoet.files.wordpress.com
2013-10-03 02:35:27 PM  
1 vote:
Does Rick's wife own this company too, or one of his buddies?
2013-10-03 02:33:49 PM  
1 vote:
They were awarded the contract.

That doesn't mean the care will be delivered.

It would be a lot more profitable to not use real doctors or medicines at all.
2013-10-03 02:26:47 PM  
1 vote:
Is that higher than usual?
 
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