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(Ars Technica)   It wasn't an exploit in the Tor "darknet" that got the Silk Road's founder Dread Pirate Roberts busted, it was mistakes and sloppy opsec   (arstechnica.com) divider line 48
    More: Dumbass, Silk Road, OPSEC, Forget Tor, FBI, Mises, PHP, bitcoins, wifi hotspots  
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4164 clicks; posted to Geek » on 03 Oct 2013 at 12:52 PM (42 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



48 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2013-10-03 11:08:53 AM
Maybe blatantly selling drugs on the internet isn't such a good business plan.
 
2013-10-03 11:16:08 AM
The internet is neat and all, but EVERYTHING goes through your ISP and is logged on all sides. Trying to remain anonymous online is like trying to fark a beehive to completion without getting stung.

That's why the Taliban is kicking our butts in the long haul in Afghanistan. They're offline. They stroll over to their neighbors' houses and talk about things in low voices and stroll back home. No IP, no logs, no records. All they have to do is not much and they'll ultimately win the war, despite losing nearly every battle.
 
2013-10-03 11:23:02 AM

doglover: The internet is neat and all, but EVERYTHING goes through your ISP and is logged on all sides. Trying to remain anonymous online is like trying to fark a beehive to completion without getting stung.


But.....but I use the incognito window!
 
2013-10-03 11:31:39 AM
Yea, I'm still gonna assume TOR is compromised and not touch it. Might be leaning toward conspiracy theory territory, but would the FBI really tell everyone that they found him through an exploit TOR, or would they say they didn't and have thousands of people continue to use it?

Maybe it wasn't exploited, but my desire to not get busted far outweighs my desire to get weed mailed to me.

/Only behind 6 proxies
 
2013-10-03 11:40:30 AM

scottydoesntknow: Maybe it wasn't exploited, but my desire to not get busted far outweighs my desire to get weed mailed to me.

/Only behind 6 proxies


I seriously doubt the Feds give a rat's ass about the people who bought a few bags of weed or whatever here and there.

Now if you were selling or bought in large quantities that's an entirely different story.
 
2013-10-03 11:50:33 AM

WalkingCarpet: scottydoesntknow: Maybe it wasn't exploited, but my desire to not get busted far outweighs my desire to get weed mailed to me.

/Only behind 6 proxies

I seriously doubt the Feds give a rat's ass about the people who bought a few bags of weed or whatever here and there.

Now if you were selling or bought in large quantities that's an entirely different story.


I think it was the Murder for Hire section that really got the feds attention.
 
2013-10-03 11:58:20 AM

Tom_Slick: WalkingCarpet: scottydoesntknow: Maybe it wasn't exploited, but my desire to not get busted far outweighs my desire to get weed mailed to me.

/Only behind 6 proxies

I seriously doubt the Feds give a rat's ass about the people who bought a few bags of weed or whatever here and there.

Now if you were selling or bought in large quantities that's an entirely different story.

I think it was the Murder for Hire section that really got the feds attention.


That whole part sounds like an elaborate setup, including a staged hit pic, that would make Hank and Gomez proud.

Reading about how they caught him it's kind of hard to believe he screwed up so badly although a lot of it seems to be that the internet never forgets and it's difficult, if not impossible, to cover up or remove past internet activities even if you remember them.
 
2013-10-03 11:58:26 AM

doglover: The internet is neat and all, but EVERYTHING goes through your ISP and is logged on all sides. Trying to remain anonymous online is like trying to fark a beehive to completion without getting stung.

That's why the Taliban is kicking our butts in the long haul in Afghanistan. They're offline. They stroll over to their neighbors' houses and talk about things in low voices and stroll back home. No IP, no logs, no records. All they have to do is not much and they'll ultimately win the war, despite losing nearly every battle.


Well, when there isn't anything to intercept, you can't intercept it.
 
2013-10-03 12:08:07 PM
I've got my Firefox settings on Private Browsing. The feds'll never catch me!
 
2013-10-03 12:21:47 PM

WalkingCarpet: the internet never forgets and it's difficult, if not impossible, to cover up or remove past internet activities even if you remember them.


That's just it.

You have to completely start from scratch and never, ever use anything from your past that could possibly link you to the new identity.

But that assumes you know that what you are about to do is going to attract the interest of the government.  It also assumes that you are exceedingly paranoid and anal retentive about security.  Most people aren't.

Really, the *ONLY* way to get away with that sort of thing, is to sever every online tie you have at once, deactivate all user accounts, destroy all previous hardware, and start from scratch.
 
2013-10-03 01:04:10 PM

doglover: The internet is neat and all, but EVERYTHING goes through your ISP and is logged on all sides. Trying to remain anonymous online is like trying to fark a beehive to completion without getting stung.

That's why the Taliban is kicking our butts in the long haul in Afghanistan. They're offline. They stroll over to their neighbors' houses and talk about things in low voices and stroll back home. No IP, no logs, no records. All they have to do is not much and they'll ultimately win the war, despite losing nearly every battle.


Pretty much, and no matter how brilliant a hacker or programmer is, the NSA etc. has 100 hackers/programmers just as smart who definitely are not script kiddies. The internet is inherently insecure.
 
2013-10-03 01:05:23 PM
Moron.
 
2013-10-03 01:05:33 PM
Wasn't even that really.  It ws his insatiable need to natter on about his libertarian ideas and Austriain School Economics and to post virtually the same rants under his DPR handle as his real name.

That, and being dumb enough to believe that there really are such things as hitmen, and you can actually hire them over the internet.

(and he paid the guy $80 K IN CAS- no Bitcoins?--and of course he was an undercover FBI agent

Still Silk Road was a nice proff of concept and I wouldn;t be shocked to see REAL criminals who know how to properly gangster, say a Mexican Cartel or Russian Crime family, replicate it in the near future
 
2013-10-03 01:08:27 PM

WalkingCarpet: scottydoesntknow: Maybe it wasn't exploited, but my desire to not get busted far outweighs my desire to get weed mailed to me.

/Only behind 6 proxies

I seriously doubt the Feds give a rat's ass about the people who bought a few bags of weed or whatever here and there.

Now if you were selling or bought in large quantities that's an entirely different story.


I agree with you in principle (in that they wouldn't use resources to chase down people who gota few grams) but I think that if a similar site was started that say only sold cannabis in small quantities, the Feds would get all over that eventually, too.

In my opinion they don't care about the drugs as much as all the money being exchanged without Uncle Sam getting a cut. I'm very interested to see what they do with all the BC they seized. Convert it to cash? Just hold it in an e-wallet?
 
2013-10-03 01:17:08 PM

js34603: I agree with you in principle (in that they wouldn't use resources to chase down people who gota few grams) but I think that if a similar site was started that say only sold cannabis in small quantities, the Feds would get all over that eventually, too.

In my opinion they don't care about the drugs as much as all the money being exchanged without Uncle Sam getting a cut. I'm very interested to see what they do with all the BC they seized. Convert it to cash? Just hold it in an e-wallet?


Yeah, I would think that their interest is taking down the front and going after the big vendors and the personal consumption buyers hould not be worried.  After all, how can they prove that you once possessed the drugs you bought, even if they could trace the Bitcoin transaction back to you?  It also says right there in the indictment that tracing the Bitcoin transactions back to anyone is just about impossible due to the tumbling SR used.

Seems like their MO was to take down the site and Dread Pirate Roberts and use fake accounts for buys to go after vendors via USPS mail tracing or however they're doing it.

Not sure what they're going to do with all those Bitcoins.  Hold onto them for more honeypot stings?
 
2013-10-03 01:20:32 PM

dittybopper: WalkingCarpet: the internet never forgets and it's difficult, if not impossible, to cover up or remove past internet activities even if you remember them.

That's just it.

You have to completely start from scratch and never, ever use anything from your past that could possibly link you to the new identity.

But that assumes you know that what you are about to do is going to attract the interest of the government.  It also assumes that you are exceedingly paranoid and anal retentive about security.  Most people aren't.

Really, the *ONLY* way to get away with that sort of thing, is to sever every online tie you have at once, deactivate all user accounts, destroy all previous hardware, and start from scratch.


I don't think destroying your old profile is necessary.  You would have to create a new one, of course, but only access that new one from entirely physically separate sources from your normal life. Additionally, accessing that source should involve not physically going there, as it will ultimately fall under surveillance.

One example would be using a RAT on some neighbor's home computer, and accessing that RAT from somewhere like a coffee shop. When the neighbor ultimately gets busted, time to pull the plug on that account.
 
2013-10-03 01:33:25 PM
The Google+ profile tied to the r­ossu­lbricht[nospam-﹫-backwards]lia­m­g­*c­om address included a list of favorite videos originating from mises.org, a website of the "Mises Institute." The site billed itself as the "world center of the Austrian School of economics" and contained a user profile for one Ross Ulbricht. Several Dread Pirate Roberts postings on Silk Road cited the "Austrian Economic theory" and the works of Mises Institute economists Ludwig von Mises and Murray Rothbard in providing the guiding principles for the illicit drug market.

Oh... he's one of THOSE guys. Well, he was bound to slip up sooner or later, what with his tenuous grasp on how things work in the real world.
 
2013-10-03 01:52:04 PM

dittybopper: Really, the *ONLY* way to get away with that sort of thing, is to sever every online tie you have at once, deactivate all user accounts, destroy all previous hardware, and start from scratch


i'd almost say you had to do that twice... once to seperate from your real self, and again once after you've learned how to do it correctly. i wouldn't want my first test of if i'd done my research properly to be the sale of 40 lbs of uncut heroin and i wouldn't want my last "normal" interaction to have been searching "how to anonymously sell 40lbs of uncut heroin" either.
 
2013-10-03 02:21:38 PM
I always assumed that Silk Road was an FBI front from day 1. Just quietly tabulating and mapping criminal activities to try to find some kingpins when everyone got comfortable with it.
 
2013-10-03 02:28:54 PM
I'll admit not to know anything about Tor or the darknet, but if DPR tried to hire someone to kill a guy who was going to expose the identities of SR users, how secure can the system be? How did the blackmailer get the identities? Only way I can think of is that he was a seller and had the mailing addresses of his customers - but exposing them would expose himself as a dealer.

If this was a movie, this would be a plot hole.
 
2013-10-03 02:40:53 PM
The world's "greatest's" or "most secure" anything will always be brought down because we plain security for logical things (technology) instead of illogical users (humans). The dude could have been locked up on the moon but it wont help if he has the equilivant of a big-ass neon sign that says "Here I am!"
 
2013-10-03 03:08:11 PM
Internet: Developed by the DoD
Tor: Developed by the DoD
BitCoin: Developed by an unknown individual or group

Yeah, that sounds like a totally safe way to hide from the US government.
 
2013-10-03 03:22:12 PM
I just don't believe that the Feds happened to find 9 fake id's in a "routine mail check". Just too similar to when you find 100 kilos of coke during a routine traffic stop.
 
2013-10-03 04:31:55 PM

doglover: The internet is neat and all, but EVERYTHING goes through your ISP and is logged on all sides. Trying to remain anonymous online is like trying to fark a beehive to completion without getting stung.

That's why the Taliban is kicking our butts in the long haul in Afghanistan. They're offline. They stroll over to their neighbors' houses and talk about things in low voices and stroll back home. No IP, no logs, no records. All they have to do is not much and they'll ultimately win the war, despite losing nearly every battle.


True - but they also have a modest objective - they just want us to bug out of the middle east and leave their antiquated, f**ked up world alone - and as soon as their oil's gone, we will anyway. So in the long run, they can't lose.
 
2013-10-03 04:46:59 PM

I Like Bread: The Google+ profile tied to the r­o­s­su­lb­rich­t[nospam-﹫-backwards]l­iam­g­*com address included a list of favorite videos originating from mises.org, a website of the "Mises Institute." The site billed itself as the "world center of the Austrian School of economics" and contained a user profile for one Ross Ulbricht. Several Dread Pirate Roberts postings on Silk Road cited the "Austrian Economic theory" and the works of Mises Institute economists Ludwig von Mises and Murray Rothbard in providing the guiding principles for the illicit drug market.

Oh... he's one of THOSE guys. Well, he was bound to slip up sooner or later, what with his tenuous grasp on how things work in the real world.


The is only 28. Not a whole lot of real world experience.
 
2013-10-03 05:10:21 PM
I use the TOR network to stream sports out of market

/dangerous individual
 
2013-10-03 05:26:33 PM
I'll report my comment from the Bitcoin thread.

"That is what they claim but why would anyone actually believe it? Does anyone seriously think the law enforcement agencies will announce to the whole world that Tor is compromised so that the bad guys stop using it? Get real. The hilarious thing is that anyone trusts what the security agencies say. "

If you think they caught him because he was a "moron" I think it is you who are the moran.
 
2013-10-03 05:37:06 PM

doglover: The internet is neat and all, but EVERYTHING goes through your ISP and is logged on all sides. Trying to remain anonymous online is like trying to fark a beehive to completion without getting stung.

That's why the Taliban is kicking our butts in the long haul in Afghanistan. They're offline. They stroll over to their neighbors' houses and talk about things in low voices and stroll back home. No IP, no logs, no records. All they have to do is not much and they'll ultimately win the war, despite losing nearly every battle.


We knew that was a threat even before Afghanistan.
 
2013-10-03 05:59:07 PM

worlddan: I'll report my comment from the Bitcoin thread.

"That is what they claim but why would anyone actually believe it? Does anyone seriously think the law enforcement agencies will announce to the whole world that Tor is compromised so that the bad guys stop using it? Get real. The hilarious thing is that anyone trusts what the security agencies say. "

If you think they caught him because he was a "moron" I think it is you who are the moran.


There are still a lot of people out there who are convinced the Feds no nothing about hacking/counterhacking and can barely use e-mail.  Just try and explain to them how most of the truly brilliant hackers are now working for the Feds or the private sector because it pays a hell of a lot better than a shiatty IT/networking job and watch the stream of denial spew forth.
 
2013-10-03 05:59:40 PM

worlddan: I'll report my comment from the Bitcoin thread.

"That is what they claim but why would anyone actually believe it? Does anyone seriously think the law enforcement agencies will announce to the whole world that Tor is compromised so that the bad guys stop using it? Get real. The hilarious thing is that anyone trusts what the security agencies say. "

If you think they caught him because he was a "moron" I think it is you who are the moran.


He subscribes to the Austrian School, that's all the proof I need that he's a moron.
 
2013-10-03 06:14:47 PM

Magorn: Wasn't even that really.  It ws his insatiable need to natter on about his libertarian ideas and Austriain School Economics and to post virtually the same rants under his DPR handle as his real name.

That, and being dumb enough to believe that there really are such things as hitmen, and you can actually hire them over the internet.

(and he paid the guy $80 K IN CAS- no Bitcoins?--and of course he was an undercover FBI agent

Still Silk Road was a nice proff of concept and I wouldn;t be shocked to see REAL criminals who know how to properly gangster, say a Mexican Cartel or Russian Crime family, replicate it in the near future


like the people with money behind Atlantis?
http://www.ibtimes.com/atlantis-illegal-online-drug-marketplace-forc ed -shut-down-due-security-reasons-outside-our-control
oh crap. nevermind.
 
2013-10-03 06:21:32 PM

GRCooper: I'll admit not to know anything about Tor or the darknet, but if DPR tried to hire someone to kill a guy who was going to expose the identities of SR users, how secure can the system be? How did the blackmailer get the identities? Only way I can think of is that he was a seller and had the mailing addresses of his customers - but exposing them would expose himself as a dealer.

If this was a movie, this would be a plot hole.


nm - a follow up Ars article explains it. Blackmailer claimed to have cracked a dealer's SR customer list.
 
2013-10-03 08:16:54 PM
It's pretty safe to assume that many TOR portals are already being monitored by the NSA.

They might not be able to read the traffic once it hits TOR, it's quite easy to hit the admin of a portal over the head with a wrench and monitor all the data that comes through.

It's also safe to assume all the assassins advertising on TOR are federal agents.

/I don't use tor
//I look at freaky porn to keep the NSA away.
 
2013-10-03 09:52:11 PM

Magorn: Wasn't even that really.  It ws his insatiable need to natter on about his libertarian ideas and Austriain School Economics and to post virtually the same rants under his DPR handle as his real name.

That, and being dumb enough to believe that there really are such things as hitmen, and you can actually hire them over the internet.

(and he paid the guy $80 K IN CAS- no Bitcoins?--and of course he was an undercover FBI agent


I know nothing about the Austrian School of Economics.  But the user name in two location taking the same position on a topic could easily be circumstantial.   Just because someone on both FARK and 4Chan with a handle of 'Ned Ludd' talk about how wonderful Rand Economics is doesn't mean their the same person.  A Randian would be drawn to a character like Ludd and be tempted to use that name as a moniker.  It isn't evidence.

To me it sounds more like one of the things they found after they had a pretty good idea of who ran Silk Road.  It may have help confirm that they had the right guy but it couldn't have been a factor in originally locating the person.  The FBI has access to all communications on the web.  HTTPS was compromised by NSA.  They probably back tracked his communications through his ISP.

Dread Pirate Roberts was in a position where he needed to advertise his product and be accessible to the general public.  To do this he needs to be somewhat accessible.  The need for accessibility is incompatible with the need to secrecy when selling an illegal product.
 
2013-10-03 10:42:06 PM

Muta: Magorn: Wasn't even that really.  It ws his insatiable need to natter on about his libertarian ideas and Austriain School Economics and to post virtually the same rants under his DPR handle as his real name.

That, and being dumb enough to believe that there really are such things as hitmen, and you can actually hire them over the internet.

(and he paid the guy $80 K IN CAS- no Bitcoins?--and of course he was an undercover FBI agent

I know nothing about the Austrian School of Economics.  But the user name in two location taking the same position on a topic could easily be circumstantial.   Just because someone on both FARK and 4Chan with a handle of 'Ned Ludd' talk about how wonderful Rand Economics is doesn't mean their the same person.  A Randian would be drawn to a character like Ludd and be tempted to use that name as a moniker.  It isn't evidence.

To me it sounds more like one of the things they found after they had a pretty good idea of who ran Silk Road.  It may have help confirm that they had the right guy but it couldn't have been a factor in originally locating the person.  The FBI has access to all communications on the web.  HTTPS was compromised by NSA.  They probably back tracked his communications through his ISP.

Dread Pirate Roberts was in a position where he needed to advertise his product and be accessible to the general public.  To do this he needs to be somewhat accessible.  The need for accessibility is incompatible with the need to secrecy when selling an illegal product.


From experience, 80 percent of convictions come from circumstantial evidence.  So few criminals go to trial when there are eyewitnesses to the crime.
 
2013-10-03 10:54:10 PM

Muta: Magorn: Wasn't even that really.  It ws his insatiable need to natter on about his libertarian ideas and Austriain School Economics and to post virtually the same rants under his DPR handle as his real name.

That, and being dumb enough to believe that there really are such things as hitmen, and you can actually hire them over the internet.

(and he paid the guy $80 K IN CAS- no Bitcoins?--and of course he was an undercover FBI agent

I know nothing about the Austrian School of Economics.  But the user name in two location taking the same position on a topic could easily be circumstantial.   Just because someone on both FARK and 4Chan with a handle of 'Ned Ludd' talk about how wonderful Rand Economics is doesn't mean their the same person.  A Randian would be drawn to a character like Ludd and be tempted to use that name as a moniker.  It isn't evidence.

To me it sounds more like one of the things they found after they had a pretty good idea of who ran Silk Road.  It may have help confirm that they had the right guy but it couldn't have been a factor in originally locating the person.  The FBI has access to all communications on the web.  HTTPS was compromised by NSA.  They probably back tracked his communications through his ISP.

Dread Pirate Roberts was in a position where he needed to advertise his product and be accessible to the general public.  To do this he needs to be somewhat accessible.  The need for accessibility is incompatible with the need to secrecy when selling an illegal product.




In a Forbes interview DPR claimed to not have started Silk Road, but taken it over from the founder...I would not put it past the FBI/DEA to be making up evidence again based on NSA data that might be wrong....or that TOR is broken as it is well known Bitcoin transactions can be followed.

/the sending of money from an Australian bank account to the "hit man" is indeed very strange for someone with $80 million of Bitcoins.
 
2013-10-03 11:13:31 PM
The part I haven't seen anywhere - how'd they find the actual server?  It looks like getting a physical server provided a lot of the evidence for the arrest.
 
2013-10-03 11:20:25 PM

madgonad: I always assumed that Silk Road was an FBI front from day 1. Just quietly tabulating and mapping criminal activities to try to find some kingpins when everyone got comfortable with it.


My first thought when I heard of it was, "Really? An on-line black market? More like a honeypot."
 
2013-10-03 11:40:57 PM

halB: To me it sounds more like one of the things they found after they had a pretty good idea of who ran Silk Road.  It may have help confirm that they had the right guy but it couldn't have been a factor in originally locating the person.


Pretty much.  They nailed him when the Feds effectively (and silently) seized the servers on July 23 and acquired the entire site, transaction ledger, IP addresses, bit coin wallets, private messages and chat logs and went from there.  Detail on how this was legally done are scant in the complaint.

This idea he was only busted being sloppy on internet chat boards is wrong I think, obviously using the same alias twice / real names and not utilising encryption is a bad idea if you're in the business of being an internet crime lord, though it seems to me to be a more of a case of getting access to the above and old fashioned sneaky police work.
 
2013-10-04 12:16:16 AM

HempHead: /the sending of money from an Australian bank account to the "hit man" is indeed very strange for someone with $80 million of Bitcoins.


Hitmen don't accept Monopoly toy money. Real money only.
 
2013-10-04 04:56:17 AM

Wolf_Blitzer: He subscribes to the Austrian School, that's all the proof I need that he's a moron.



They had me at 'Bitcoins'.
 
2013-10-04 06:34:49 AM
If this guy wasn't smart enough to start a clean nic for only his Silk Road operations, he deserved exactly what he got.
 
2013-10-04 08:14:36 AM

fang06554: The part I haven't seen anywhere - how'd they find the actual server?  It looks like getting a physical server provided a lot of the evidence for the arrest.


You run a WHOIS on the IP address, then call up the ISP that owns that IP, show them a warrant, then do as you please.

/You can't run a server over VPN.
 
2013-10-04 09:23:04 AM

fang06554: The part I haven't seen anywhere - how'd they find the actual server?  It looks like getting a physical server provided a lot of the evidence for the arrest.




Evidently, in addition to dealing in cash, this guy did not use TOR to administer the site, so I imagine NSA just grabbed all his network traffic.
 
2013-10-04 10:27:44 AM

HempHead: fang06554: The part I haven't seen anywhere - how'd they find the actual server?  It looks like getting a physical server provided a lot of the evidence for the arrest.

Evidently, in addition to dealing in cash, this guy did not use TOR to administer the site, so I imagine NSA just grabbed all his network traffic.


Don't remember which article I read it in, but apparently the feds tracked it down to the host country - which has an agreement with the feds to cooperate in cases like this (something to check before you choose your host, kids!).  They dumped a mirror; never even had to take him offline.
 
2013-10-04 11:28:13 AM

jso2897: doglover: The internet is neat and all, but EVERYTHING goes through your ISP and is logged on all sides. Trying to remain anonymous online is like trying to fark a beehive to completion without getting stung.

That's why the Taliban is kicking our butts in the long haul in Afghanistan. They're offline. They stroll over to their neighbors' houses and talk about things in low voices and stroll back home. No IP, no logs, no records. All they have to do is not much and they'll ultimately win the war, despite losing nearly every battle.

True - but they also have a modest objective - they just want us to bug out of the middle east and leave their antiquated, f**ked up world alone - and as soon as their oil's gone, we will anyway. So in the long run, they can't lose.


Except that's only the first step of what they want.  After they get power there they want to expand to everywhere there are Muslims.  (In other words, everywhere.)
 
2013-10-04 02:06:43 PM

jso2897: doglover: The internet is neat and all, but EVERYTHING goes through your ISP and is logged on all sides. Trying to remain anonymous online is like trying to fark a beehive to completion without getting stung.

That's why the Taliban is kicking our butts in the long haul in Afghanistan. They're offline. They stroll over to their neighbors' houses and talk about things in low voices and stroll back home. No IP, no logs, no records. All they have to do is not much and they'll ultimately win the war, despite losing nearly every battle.

True - but they also have a modest objective - they just want us to bug out of the middle east and leave their antiquated, f**ked up world alone - and as soon as their oil's gone, we will anyway. So in the long run, they can't lose.


Taliban, maybe. Al Qaeda, absolutely not. AQ wants a worldwide Caliphate, where we are all ruled according to the Quran.There is no appeasing AQ; they are incompatible with Western society.
 
2013-10-04 04:07:45 PM
I am annoyed with that article parroting the pre-sold lie about an earlier story - about the freedom hosting bust.  They simply described it as a "child porn website" and this is quite incorrect.  It was a TOR hidden service hosting provider - easily the largest - which did host (for customers) a few of those sites but it probably hosted just about everything really I don't think they cared what they where hosting.  More importantly it hosted TORmail which was widely used by activist, journalists, and whistle blowers.

Now if you use your head and realize it was the NSA (and not the FBI) who ran point finding the guy behind Freedom Hosting - just ask yourself "what is the NSA's mission?  Does the NSA really care about going after a child porn website or do you think TORmail makes for a MUCH more likely and attractive target?"  No doubt they wanted to read the content of those emails.

Now the child porn thing makes for great public relations and so it makes a great distraction so people aren't going "why did you a-holes go after TORmail?!"  But no one is going to criticize an operation to go after pedophiles.  Make no mistake this was never about child porn and has always been about continuing the war on journalism/whistle blowers/anything they can't control or do not like.  And so that is why I am greatly annoyed with this article parroting the official narrative.

Of course I don't expect any major voices to speak up about this - they would just be called pedos or pedo-sympathizers even though the real story here has nothing to do with child porn and everything to do with shutting down anything resembling private speech.

As to the Farker saying TOR is compromised - take it from someone who pays far more attention to TOR than you that no it is not compromised in the least.  No doubt the NSA would have you believe otherwise.  There are tons of stories of people who happen to use TOR getting busted for whatever yet not one story involves a failure of TOR.  Every case has involved someone getting busted by other means - this article is a prime example of the mistakes people make.
 
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