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(Southern CA Public Radio)   Voice of LA to retire   (scpr.org ) divider line
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1233 clicks; posted to Sports » on 03 Oct 2013 at 9:56 AM (2 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-10-03 10:05:13 AM  
I honestly thought you were talking about Rodney Bingenheimer.
 
2013-10-03 10:05:16 AM  
He is the voice of my (and many, many others) childhood(s).

It's a joy to hear him speak.
 
2013-10-03 10:21:53 AM  
For the playoffs that start Thursday, Scully will only be heard on the radio. That's a travesty, as far as many Dodgers fans are concerned.

It's a travesty period. What in the hell is wrong with major league baseball, that they have one of the last of the superstar announcers, literally a link between generations that will plug the game just by being there like nothing else they can do-----and they are shutting him down? Limiting this hall of fame guy to only LA radio? WTF?
 
2013-10-03 10:24:00 AM  
I never understood his significance.

Maybe because I'm not old enough to remember the good ole days of baseball where you would sit around an AM radio and listen to a game with your father while he chain smoked Lucky Strikes and referred to his wife as "broad".
 
2013-10-03 10:26:20 AM  

fatalvenom: I never understood his significance.

Maybe because I'm not old enough to remember the good ole days of baseball where you would sit around an AM radio and listen to a game with your father while he chain smoked Lucky Strikes and referred to his wife as "broad".


You are too credulous to watch as much TV as you do.
 
2013-10-03 10:40:35 AM  
In before "national treasure."

Look, I think the guy is great, but the hagiography we seen on Fark sometimes gets extreme.
 
2013-10-03 10:51:57 AM  

fatalvenom: I never understood his significance.

Maybe because I'm not old enough to remember the good ole days of baseball where you would sit around an AM radio and listen to a game with your father while he chain smoked Lucky Strikes and referred to his wife as "broad".


He is good at his craft, but it is simply that he's the last one standing among the pre-TV greats.  He used to drive me absolutely nuts with his off the wall stats:  "Cey comes to the plate and he'shiatting .288 against left-handed Oklahomans on grass at night."
 
2013-10-03 11:15:39 AM  
Nobody could spin a yarn like Vin.  Hopefully you sign on for 1 more year as the Angels broadcast announcer before you retire.  Payback for the McCourts not paying you on time.
 
2013-10-03 11:17:02 AM  
If he does retire and you guys need a new national treasure of an announcer, we'll send you Hawk Harrelson.
 
2013-10-03 11:25:13 AM  

fatalvenom: I never understood his significance.

Maybe because I'm not old enough to remember the good ole days of baseball where you would sit around an AM radio and listen to a game with your father while he chain smoked Lucky Strikes and referred to his wife as "broad".


I'm only 36 so you'll have to excuse me, but it wasn't until relatively recently that the Dodgers televised games at home. Up through my high school years, they really only televised road games and even then not all of the games were televised.

If you wanted to keep up with the Dodgers, you had to listen to them on the radio or you had to check the score in the paper the next morning. There were scores of kids like me that went to bed listening to Scully (and Ross) on our radios.

I would say that for the first half of my life, I probably heard the Dodgers more than I saw them. It was a special treat when the Braves or Cubs rolled into town in the 80s and early 90s because a Dodgers home game was on TV.
 
2013-10-03 11:43:35 AM  

fatalvenom: I never understood his significance.

Maybe because I'm not old enough to remember the good ole days of baseball where you would sit around an AM radio and listen to a game with your father while he chain smoked Lucky Strikes and referred to his wife as "broad".


I'm only 42 and remember the days when maybe a dozen St. Louis Cardinal games would get shown on TV. (Even well into the late 80's) The only way to get the other 140-150 games was on the radio. In my household it was perfectly acceptable to do homework while listening to Jack Buck announce Cardinal games. It was always a bummer when he'd get pulled away for national baseball and NFL games.

"Kids" these days now expect all 162 games to be on TV with little care of who is announcing.

/Get off my lawn etc etc etc
 
2013-10-03 12:10:07 PM  
I will take Vin on the radio over ANY commentator on TV.  ANY.
 
2013-10-03 12:26:58 PM  
 
2013-10-03 12:30:09 PM  

fatalvenom: I never understood his significance.

Maybe because I'm not old enough to remember the good ole days of baseball where you would sit around an AM radio and listen to a game with your father while he chain smoked Lucky Strikes and referred to his wife as "broad".


He can tell stories of first hand accounts with baseball greats.   "I remember one evening I was talking with Jackie Robinson, and he said to me...."

There are very few people left in baseball who can regale us with stories of this caliber, first hand.  He's been the link between the games and the fans for 65 years.  Many of us grew up with his voice as a constant, calming sound.  Hearing him gives us a subtle pleasant feeling, like your favorite grandfather telling you a story.

He was on air when Rick Monday took the flag away from the protesters who were about to burn it.  He announced one of the greatest moments in Dodger history - the Kirk Gibson home run in game 1 of the 88 series.  So many historical moments, he was the voice delivering them to the fans.

His significance cannot be overstated.
 
2013-10-03 12:36:26 PM  

fatalvenom: I never understood his significance.

Maybe because I'm not old enough to remember the good ole days of baseball where you would sit around an AM radio and listen to a game with your father while he chain smoked Lucky Strikes and referred to his wife as "broad".


Curt Gowdy, Ned Martin, Jim Woods. "The soundtrack of our childhood" is the apt phrase.
 
2013-10-03 12:46:55 PM  
He's one of the last and if you grew up with him I can understand all the adulation, I grew up with Ernie so I get it. BUT...listening to him in "For the Love of the Game" made me want to shove ice picks in my ears.
 
2013-10-03 12:55:50 PM  

ladodger34: fatalvenom: I never understood his significance.

Maybe because I'm not old enough to remember the good ole days of baseball where you would sit around an AM radio and listen to a game with your father while he chain smoked Lucky Strikes and referred to his wife as "broad".

I'm only 36 so you'll have to excuse me, but it wasn't until relatively recently that the Dodgers televised games at home. Up through my high school years, they really only televised road games and even then not all of the games were televised.

If you wanted to keep up with the Dodgers, you had to listen to them on the radio or you had to check the score in the paper the next morning. There were scores of kids like me that went to bed listening to Scully (and Ross) on our radios.

I would say that for the first half of my life, I probably heard the Dodgers more than I saw them. It was a special treat when the Braves or Cubs rolled into town in the 80s and early 90s because a Dodgers home game was on TV.


I grew up a Red Sox fan in FL, so I never got the whole hometown announcer thing.

I would check scores in the paper, and once in a while I'd get to see a game nationally televised.

I'm only 30 so I guess it's an age gap thing.
 
2013-10-03 02:40:44 PM  

fatalvenom: ladodger34: fatalvenom: I never understood his significance.

Maybe because I'm not old enough to remember the good ole days of baseball where you would sit around an AM radio and listen to a game with your father while he chain smoked Lucky Strikes and referred to his wife as "broad".

I'm only 36 so you'll have to excuse me, but it wasn't until relatively recently that the Dodgers televised games at home. Up through my high school years, they really only televised road games and even then not all of the games were televised.

If you wanted to keep up with the Dodgers, you had to listen to them on the radio or you had to check the score in the paper the next morning. There were scores of kids like me that went to bed listening to Scully (and Ross) on our radios.

I would say that for the first half of my life, I probably heard the Dodgers more than I saw them. It was a special treat when the Braves or Cubs rolled into town in the 80s and early 90s because a Dodgers home game was on TV.

I grew up a Red Sox fan in FL, so I never got the whole hometown announcer thing.

I would check scores in the paper, and once in a while I'd get to see a game nationally televised.

I'm only 30 so I guess it's an age gap thing.


It's probably as much of the Florida thing as much as it is an age gap thing.

And I'm not joking when I say the best way to check the score was to turn the radio on. Now there are a gazillion ways to check a score. Sports apps, that ticker thing on sports channels, twitter, websites, the text alerts every 3 innings that I get, etc. Not to mention that I can just turn on the game and see the score at the top of my screen.
 
2013-10-03 02:56:59 PM  

softshoes: He's one of the last and if you grew up with him I can understand all the adulation, I grew up with Ernie so I get it. BUT...listening to him in "For the Love of the Game" made me want to shove ice picks in my ears.


I think you have him confused with Steve Lyons!

But IIRC, most of the stuff in "For Love of the Game" was scripted. He did improv a few lines, though.

It was a sort of weird, abbreviated version of Vin in the movie. It was like Sam Raimi wanted to make everything that came out of Vin's mouth like it was the Gibson homerun call.

Google "sandy koufax perfect game" and give a listen to 9th inning. That's the essence of Vinny.

And I will say that I am sad I didn't get to hear more Harwell. By the time I was able to hear him (Espn radio during the playoffs in the 90s) he had clearly lost his fastball. He was still a joy to listen to, though.
 
2013-10-03 03:00:47 PM  

brap: I honestly thought you were talking about Rodney Bingenheimer.


"Wow the Go-Go's yeah alright."
 
2013-10-03 03:30:56 PM  

fatalvenom: I never understood his significance.

Maybe because I'm not old enough to remember the good ole days of baseball where you would sit around an AM radio and listen to a game with your father while he chain smoked Lucky Strikes and referred to his wife as "broad".


Anybody can keep score and track the action on the field...with the possible exception of Joe Buck.  Vin is an immersive experience.You could be stuck on 60 at Azusa or in a dorm room in Irvine or sleeping under a bridge in Ventura, but the moment you hear him, you're transported to the Elysian fields of Chavez Ravine, the smell of Dodger Dogs grilling, the shouts of beer vendors erupting, and a slight breeze out to right field. And it's not even now--it's 1955, 1981, and today, seamlessly woven together. He, unlike others, will stop a story to relay what's going on in the game, then pick up right where he left off. Best of all, he recognizes that there are 29 other teams and rarely, if ever, shows his true bias--towards the Giants.
 
2013-10-03 03:43:46 PM  

varmitydog: For the playoffs that start Thursday, Scully will only be heard on the radio. That's a travesty, as far as many Dodgers fans are concerned.

It's a travesty period. What in the hell is wrong with major league baseball, that they have one of the last of the superstar announcers, literally a link between generations that will plug the game just by being there like nothing else they can do-----and they are shutting him down? Limiting this hall of fame guy to only LA radio? WTF?


I don't think baseball has input to who Fox or TBS hires as commentators.
 
2013-10-03 03:52:22 PM  

ladodger34: It was a special treat when the Braves or Cubs rolled into town


Have these words ever been spoken or typed before!? Will they ever again?
 
2013-10-03 04:20:04 PM  
OtherLittleGuy:
Maybe because I'm not old enough to remember the good ole days of baseball where you would sit around an AM radio and listen to a game with your father while he chain smoked Lucky Strikes and referred to his wife as "broad".

Curt Gowdy, Ned Martin, Jim Woods. "The soundtrack of our childhood" is the apt phrase.



Yup.  Grew up with this guy (and he was on that sitcom I watched as a kid).

sportscoma.com
 
2013-10-03 04:24:31 PM  

varmitydog: For the playoffs that start Thursday, Scully will only be heard on the radio. That's a travesty, as far as many Dodgers fans are concerned.

It's a travesty period. What in the hell is wrong with major league baseball, that they have one of the last of the superstar announcers, literally a link between generations that will plug the game just by being there like nothing else they can do-----and they are shutting him down? Limiting this hall of fame guy to only LA radio? WTF?


FTFA: "I've had plenty of experience on the network," Scully said. "And as far as now, trying to be 'guested back in?' I don't want any part of that. I don't belong there. I don't deserve to be there. And I'm very happy to be on the radio."

This is why I worry about Joe Buck's (past) offer to step aside if the Dodgers make the World Series. Would Vin accept that offer? I want him to accept that offer if they make it that far. But I don't think he'd accept it.
 
2013-10-03 04:46:36 PM  

skrame: ladodger34: It was a special treat when the Braves or Cubs rolled into town

Have these words ever been spoken or typed before!? Will they ever again?


In the 80s it was (except for a few years. You got to see games on TV and the visiting was usually a patsy.

Then the Braves got all good in the 90s and had to ruin a good thing.
 
2013-10-03 05:05:23 PM  
As a lifelong (and its been a while) Dodger fan, I am glad to see him go. He was good in his day but this year I had MLB and watched most Dodger games and would switch to the other team's broadcast when he announced. He almost never shuts up and seems to be mostly reading facts and stories off a sheet of paper. He also is now making quite a few errors.

/Someone should tell him how to pronounce Evers, as in Tinkers to Evers to Chance.
 
2013-10-03 07:04:35 PM  
Well, it's his last show. If Joe Buck follows thru with his promise and my Dodgers make the WS, we could get something very special indeed. Not holding breath or anything but it would be something that the overlords would approve of.  Just saying...........
 
2013-10-03 07:24:23 PM  
If he LIVES to 2014! I respect his tenure and expertise, but the guy puts me to sleep faster than chasing an ambien with NyQuil. And the stories he tells... I don't care about the time that farm league kid made a catch in his t-ball league. When something happens during the game, it's like it interrupted his story! Farewell.
 
2013-10-03 08:21:19 PM  

Lt. Cheese Weasel: Well, it's his last show. If Joe Buck follows thru with his promise and my Dodgers make the WS, we could get something very special indeed. Not holding breath or anything but it would be something that the overlords would approve of.  Just saying...........


www.paranormalknowledge.com

A riot?
 
2013-10-03 08:38:44 PM  

capngroovy: fatalvenom: I never understood his significance.

Maybe because I'm not old enough to remember the good ole days of baseball where you would sit around an AM radio and listen to a game with your father while he chain smoked Lucky Strikes and referred to his wife as "broad".

Anybody can keep score and track the action on the field...with the possible exception of Joe Buck.  Vin is an immersive experience.You could be stuck on 60 at Azusa or in a dorm room in Irvine or sleeping under a bridge in Ventura, but the moment you hear him, you're transported to the Elysian fields of Chavez Ravine, the smell of Dodger Dogs grilling, the shouts of beer vendors erupting, and a slight breeze out to right field. And it's not even now--it's 1955, 1981, and today, seamlessly woven together. He, unlike others, will stop a story to relay what's going on in the game, then pick up right where he left off. Best of all, he recognizes that there are 29 other teams and rarely, if ever, shows his true bias--towards the Giants.


Well said.  I grew up listening to him on the radio, and my dad would mute the TV (when the Dodgers were televised) and turn on the radio to listen to Vin.  Same with The Lakers and Chick Hearn.  You can't overstate their impact on their respective sports.
 
2013-10-03 10:41:03 PM  

capngroovy: fatalvenom: I never understood his significance.

Maybe because I'm not old enough to remember the good ole days of baseball where you would sit around an AM radio and listen to a game with your father while he chain smoked Lucky Strikes and referred to his wife as "broad".

Anybody can keep score and track the action on the field...with the possible exception of Joe Buck.  Vin is an immersive experience.You could be stuck on 60 at Azusa or in a dorm room in Irvine or sleeping under a bridge in Ventura, but the moment you hear him, you're transported to the Elysian fields of Chavez Ravine, the smell of Dodger Dogs grilling, the shouts of beer vendors erupting, and a slight breeze out to right field. And it's not even now--it's 1955, 1981, and today, seamlessly woven together. He, unlike others, will stop a story to relay what's going on in the game, then pick up right where he left off. Best of all, he recognizes that there are 29 other teams and rarely, if ever, shows his true bias--towards the Giants.


This is what I mean. I'm not trying to be a dick, but I don't get this whole announcer changed and formed my life god-complex thing.

The guy called a game, told some stories and anecdotes. OK, I get it.

But the constant admiration I just don't get. Call me naive or young/out of touch whatever.

For instance, the only "hometown" broadcaster I care for is Jack Edwards. EVERYONE except a few Bruins fans hate him. I get it though, he's a homer.

Even then I don't feel the need to rush out to his defense. I also like Doc Mike Emrick, most hockey fans can't stand him either. But he makes even a boring game exciting.

I'm probably off point and rambling...but all I'm saying is that listening to Edwards and Emrick didn't form or shape my life like it seems that everyone who grew up listening to Skully has experienced.
 
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