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(Guardian)   The number of people who realize Malcolm Gladwell's books are little more than popular pseudoscientific claptrap is beginning to reach some kind of critical point of exponential growth   (theguardian.com) divider line 46
    More: Obvious, economic growths, child murder, French Village  
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3376 clicks; posted to Business » on 02 Oct 2013 at 7:50 PM (40 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



46 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-10-02 06:39:20 PM
... a tipping point, if you will
 
2013-10-02 07:00:46 PM

AzDownboy: ... a tipping point, if you will


That phrase is worse than the c-word in my house. Say it too much and my wife goes into anaphylactic shock.
 
2013-10-02 07:15:12 PM
I've heard the new book isn't very good, but it may well be an outlier.
 
2013-10-02 07:54:58 PM
Sorry, but the quality of his most recent book in no way lessens the quality of his previous books.
 
2013-10-02 07:59:58 PM
BUT LOOK AT HIS HAIR! He must be smart.
 
2013-10-02 08:02:07 PM
It's not the quality of the content. It's all about the quality of the writing.

Malcom Gladwell could sell sales textbooks to Dolph Ziggler.
 
2013-10-02 08:20:11 PM

kronicfeld


AzDownboy: ... a tipping point, if you will

That phrase is worse than the c-word in my house.


Cantilever?
 
2013-10-02 08:22:18 PM

Englebert Slaptyback: kronicfeld

AzDownboy: ... a tipping point, if you will

That phrase is worse than the c-word in my house.


Cantilever?


Cummerbund?
 
2013-10-02 08:26:57 PM

DrZiffle: Englebert Slaptyback: kronicfeld

AzDownboy: ... a tipping point, if you will

That phrase is worse than the c-word in my house.


Cantilever?

Cummerbund?


Conservative?
 
2013-10-02 08:30:40 PM

Kyosuke: DrZiffle: Englebert Slaptyback: kronicfeld

AzDownboy: ... a tipping point, if you will

That phrase is worse than the c-word in my house.


Cantilever?

Cummerbund?

Conservative?


Cook.
 
2013-10-02 08:32:21 PM
That's undoubtedly true, but it's generally well written and entertaining anecdata.
 
2013-10-02 09:02:03 PM
Count me as one of those. Lost interest on the one before Outliers.  Mary Roach on the other hand...
 
2013-10-02 09:22:52 PM
So we should base our concepts of Gladwell's new book on an article by a competing author?  Whose new book out in November sounds like it would put you to sleep by the third page.

The Confidence Trap: A History of Democracy in Crisis from World War I to the Present

That's like letting Pepsi write the Coke ads.
 
2013-10-02 09:28:01 PM
Good.

Hacks always get exposed eventually.
 
2013-10-02 09:31:02 PM
Gee, you mean stringing together a series of anecdotes isn't real science?
 
2013-10-02 09:32:37 PM

Rodeodoc: So we should base our concepts of Gladwell's new book on an article by a competing author?  Whose new book out in November sounds like it would put you to sleep by the third page.

The Confidence Trap: A History of Democracy in Crisis from World War I to the Present


That review wasn't exactly a wild roller coaster ride either.

emailcoach.net
 
2013-10-02 09:32:38 PM
What is it with staff writers of the NYT and completely shiat books?
 
2013-10-02 09:33:43 PM

MrEricSir: Gee, you mean stringing together a series of anecdotes isn't real science?


Actually, it is if you're writing a text book for the Texas educational system.
 
2013-10-02 09:34:12 PM
Being Australian, I'm unfamiliar with tipping, so when I'm overseas and a waiter wants to discuss the Pareto principle or post-Hegelian constructs of social transformation and dielectics I end up lost.

Should the Pareto group be 5%, 10% or 20%?
 
2013-10-02 10:04:02 PM

AverageAmericanGuy: Kyosuke: DrZiffle: Englebert Slaptyback: kronicfeld

AzDownboy: ... a tipping point, if you will

That phrase is worse than the c-word in my house.


Cantilever?

Cummerbund?

Conservative?

Cook.


Caulk?
 
2013-10-02 10:13:59 PM

jaytkay: AverageAmericanGuy: Kyosuke: DrZiffle: Englebert Slaptyback: kronicfeld

AzDownboy: ... a tipping point, if you will

That phrase is worse than the c-word in my house.


Cantilever?

Cummerbund?

Conservative?

Cook.

Caulk?



catheter?

Catholic?

Come -hither?

Communist?

Clap-trap?

Constipation?

Conquistitadors?
 
2013-10-02 10:44:48 PM

AzDownboy: ... a tipping point, if you will


*blink*
 
2013-10-02 11:58:52 PM

Kyosuke: Sorry, but the quality of his most recent book in no way lessens the quality of his previous books.


Thing is he has some serious issues in his previous books.
 
2013-10-03 12:40:29 AM
Yeah but it sells books.
 
2013-10-03 01:06:42 AM
These books are what non-thinking people read to feel like they are thinking-people.
 
2013-10-03 01:26:09 AM

karmaceutical: These books are what non-thinking people read to feel like they are thinking-people.


Name the last five books you read and I'll tell you whether you can join my "thinking-people" club.
 
2013-10-03 01:26:11 AM

invictus2: jaytkay: AverageAmericanGuy: Kyosuke: DrZiffle: Englebert Slaptyback: kronicfeld

AzDownboy: ... a tipping point, if you will

That phrase is worse than the c-word in my house.


Cantilever?

Cummerbund?

Conservative?

Cook.

Caulk?


catheter?

Catholic?

Come -hither?

Communist?

Clap-trap?

Constipation?

Conquistitadors?


Cumberbatch?
 
2013-10-03 01:44:52 AM
His stuff is very much based on science... and like science, there are controversies. And when it comes to psychology, sociology, neurology and economics, it's even far harder to get consensus.

What Gladwell has done is brought some of these more obscure concepts into the mainstream. Given us context and vocabulary to modern society and culture. Not everything is a tipping point (and gawd is it overused), but that's now part of our modern vernacular.

I don't agree with everything he says (like in Blink), but what he said was not new. We've known about those theories and behaviors for years, but he explained it in a way that most anybody could understand it, and it was entertaining.

He's presenting ideas, based on science and statistics. No doubt there are going to be challenges, because it's science!

Now, i agree with the author of the article. I can't stand when he or other writers 'mythologize' the people they tell stories of. I like interesting facts, like Warren Buffet, the wealthiest man in the world, still drives a piece of shiat car. I don't like long morality tales.
 
2013-10-03 06:05:06 AM

Cup Check: invictus2: jaytkay: AverageAmericanGuy: Kyosuke: DrZiffle: Englebert Slaptyback: kronicfeld

AzDownboy: ... a tipping point, if you will

That phrase is worse than the c-word in my house.


Cantilever?

Cummerbund?

Conservative?

Cook.

Caulk?


catheter?

Catholic?

Come -hither?

Communist?

Clap-trap?

Constipation?

Conquistitadors?

Cumberbatch?


Cuhnt?
 
2013-10-03 06:12:41 AM
I saw him in the library. He was looking at pictures of himself on the internet.
 
2013-10-03 07:16:05 AM
Gladwell is all about the post hoc rationalization and narrative building. I hope his publishers have been learning from the sales stats in that What The Dog Saw indicates a very limited buyers market.

They can't all be positive black swans.
 
2013-10-03 07:17:01 AM

BalugaJoe: I saw him in the library. He was looking at pictures of himself on the internet.


Was he eating crackers like he owned the place?
 
2013-10-03 08:34:18 AM
I too could write books by taking an unorthodox concept, then backfilling it with cherry-picked anecdotes to make it seem like I identified some new idea.

I'd never make money at it though.  I'm bald as fark.
 
2013-10-03 09:13:03 AM
What's with all the anecdote hate?
 
2013-10-03 09:33:00 AM
i.ytimg.com
 
2013-10-03 10:05:35 AM

moralpanic: His stuff is very much based on science... and like science, there are controversies. And when it comes to psychology, sociology, neurology and economics, it's even far harder to get consensus.

What Gladwell has done is brought some of these more obscure concepts into the mainstream. Given us context and vocabulary to modern society and culture. Not everything is a tipping point (and gawd is it overused), but that's now part of our modern vernacular.

I don't agree with everything he says (like in Blink), but what he said was not new. We've known about those theories and behaviors for years, but he explained it in a way that most anybody could understand it, and it was entertaining.

He's presenting ideas, based on science and statistics. No doubt there are going to be challenges, because it's science!

Now, i agree with the author of the article. I can't stand when he or other writers 'mythologize' the people they tell stories of. I like interesting facts, like Warren Buffet, the wealthiest man in the world, still drives a piece of shiat car. I don't like long morality tales.


His work is based on science the same way many films are based on true stories -- the basic details are there, but the story is so dramatized that the original meaning gets lost.

Gladwell is an expert cherry-picker: he finds unusual stories with a hook he can tie to an unusual (and often, obscure) scientific study and then voila! He's got an angle that seems to give him credibility.

He's an excellent writer, but his understanding of science is poor and he often shoehorns in the stories he's telling to fit his biases. He seems to be aware of these limitations, but he's addicted to the money and fame at this point.
 
2013-10-03 10:12:35 AM

MrEricSir: Gee, you mean stringing together a series of anecdotes isn't real science?


Tell that to Thomas Friedman.

Sorry, I'd tell him myself, but I'm talking to the CEO of Google in an elevator made in Taiwan.  The CEO says I'm brilliant and also that time is speeding up.  TIME IS SPEEDING UP!
 
2013-10-03 11:38:49 AM
Tipping point was interesting but largely anecdotal.  The rest are utter crap.
 
2013-10-03 11:48:47 AM

Raider_dad: [i.ytimg.com image 480x360]


*golfclaptrap*
 
2013-10-03 04:56:28 PM

wildcardjack: Gladwell is all about the post hoc rationalization and narrative building. I hope his publishers have been learning from the sales stats in that What The Dog Saw indicates a very limited buyers market.

They can't all be positive black swans.


Over a million copies sold.  Quite limited, indeed.
 
2013-10-03 05:24:08 PM

dotvincent: wildcardjack: Gladwell is all about the post hoc rationalization and narrative building. I hope his publishers have been learning from the sales stats in that What The Dog Saw indicates a very limited buyers market.

They can't all be positive black swans.

Over a million copies sold.  Quite limited, indeed.


Mostly to corporate coaches. I'm seeing a lot of them reach thrift stores unread, remaindered copies as well.
 
2013-10-03 09:31:33 PM

Triumph: karmaceutical: These books are what non-thinking people read to feel like they are thinking-people.

Name the last five books you read and I'll tell you whether you can join my "thinking-people" club.


Best impression of Comic Book Guy I've seen in a while.
 
2013-10-03 10:30:59 PM
I had to suffer through Malcom Gladwell reading the audio book of "Outliers," hearing him calling the flight instrument glideslope "the glidescope" about 100 times.

Another case where when you have personal knowledge of that facts and know how wrong the text is, you wonder what was wrong with what you read when you didn't know the subject.
 
2013-10-04 01:36:58 AM
This problem is most acute in the final chapter of the book. Gladwell recounts the history of the remote French village of Le Chambon, which stood up to the Nazis during the German occupation. ... It is a remarkable and stirring tale - it just doesn't belong in a book about David taking on Goliath.The Nazis were not Goliath. ... The occupiers left the villagers alone because they realised taking them on would be more trouble than it was worth. ... But if others in France had followed the example of Le Chambon, the village would have been wiped out. Ultimately the only way to defeat the Nazis was to match them for scale and powerThanks article writer guy for summing up why I can't stand Malcolm after thinking about it for a bit. Sure it sounds good on the outside and appeals to intelligence / emotion but it is all so many just-so stories.
 
2013-10-04 02:26:52 AM
Ah yes, Malcolm Gladwell, aka the social psychology writer most appreciated by marketers because he knows the least about social psychology.

I, too, have aspirations of compiling incredibly obtuse observations into very opaque tracts and then claim wisdom. Maybe I'll get a TED talk out of it.

Learning about social psychology from a Malcolm Gladwell book is like learning about forensics from a CSI episode.
 
2013-10-04 08:06:44 AM

JacobDavidWatson: Cup Check: invictus2: jaytkay: AverageAmericanGuy: Kyosuke: DrZiffle: Englebert Slaptyback: kronicfeld

AzDownboy: ... a tipping point, if you will

That phrase is worse than the c-word in my house.


Cantilever?

Cummerbund?

Conservative?

Cook.

Caulk?


catheter?

Catholic?

Come -hither?

Communist?

Clap-trap?

Constipation?

Conquistitadors?

Cumberbatch?

Cuhnt?


Cocína?
 
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