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(Vail Daily)   America's second astronaut suffers a stroke. God speed, Scott Carpenter   (vaildaily.com) divider line 39
    More: Hero, astronauts, strokes, geocentric orbit, oceanographies, John Wayne  
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2545 clicks; posted to Geek » on 29 Sep 2013 at 6:14 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-09-29 06:19:48 PM  
imgs.xkcd.com
 
2013-09-29 06:28:51 PM  
This guy and John Glenn were my childhood heroes

/true heroes they were
//Good luck, Commander
 
2013-09-29 06:44:23 PM  
He was actually the fourth to go up. Suborbital flights count. But that's just quibbling.
 
2013-09-29 06:45:54 PM  

wildcardjack: [imgs.xkcd.com image 740x382]


The moon is a satellite, not a world
 
2013-09-29 06:46:41 PM  

Adolf Oliver Nipples: He was actually the fourth to go up. Suborbital flights count. But that's just quibbling.


NASA really wants to forget the true second mission. At least thats what I learned from watching The Right Stuff
 
2013-09-29 06:48:01 PM  
No, he was America's FOURTH Astronaut, as in Shepard, Grissom, Glenn, then Carpenter. He was America's second astronaut in orbit. Him and Glenn were the clean living types, no wonder they're the oldest surviving.

And what's with the article? "Answer this question..." to see the rest of the text"? A whole new level of annoyance.

/space geek
 
2013-09-29 06:49:27 PM  
No. We have to go back. And there's a simple reason why. Ask ten different scientists about the environment, population control, genetics, and you'll get ten different answers, but there's one thing every scientist on the planet agrees on. Whether it happens in a hundred years or a thousand years or a million years, eventually our Sun will grow cold and go out. When that happens, it won't just take us. It'll take Marilyn Monroe, and Lao-Tzu, and Einstein, and Morobuto, and Buddy Holly, and Aristophanes, and - all of this - all of this - was for nothing. Unless we go to the stars.
 
2013-09-29 06:49:54 PM  
Damm. Late. That's what I get for Farking and watching TV at the same time.
 
2013-09-29 07:25:02 PM  
Article was worse, 2nd man to orbit. Apparently Soviets aren't men.... IIRC he was at least 4th behind Gargarin, Titov, and Glenn. Soviets prob had another in there.... We were getting our asses kicked in the space race
 
2013-09-29 07:33:39 PM  
"We are assembled here today to pay final respects to our honored dead. And yet it should be noted that in the midst of our sorrow, this death takes place in the shadow of new life, the sunrise of a new world a world that our beloved comrade gave his life to protect, to nourish. He did not feel this sacrifice a vain or empty one, and we will not debate his profound wisdom at these proceedings. Of my friend, I can only say this: Of all the souls I have encountered in my travels, his was the most... human."
 
2013-09-29 08:04:01 PM  

Bslim: "We are assembled here today to pay final respects to our honored dead. And yet it should be noted that in the midst of our sorrow, this death takes place in the shadow of new life, the sunrise of a new world a world that our beloved comrade gave his life to protect, to nourish. He did not feel this sacrifice a vain or empty one, and we will not debate his profound wisdom at these proceedings. Of my friend, I can only say this: Of all the souls I have encountered in my travels, his was the most... human."


Nice, except he didn't die.
 
2013-09-29 08:05:48 PM  

VAIL - It's John Glenn's turn to wish Scott Carpenter God speed.
Scott Carpenter, a longtime Vail local, suffered a stroke earlier this week.
Scott Carpenter, 88, and Glenn, 92, are the last living members of the Mercury 7 team, NASA's first team of astronauts. They talk almost every day and Glenn has been calling regularly since word of Scott Carpenter's stroke spread through the space community, said Patty Carpenter, Scott's wife.
"John has been one of Scott's greatest supporters," Patty said.
Scott Carpenter has been moved to rehab center specifically for stroke patients.
"The intention is to strengthen him so he can be up and around in several weeks," Patty Carpenter said.

God speed, John Glenn
Scott Carpenter is fondly remembered for his radio call "God speed, John Glenn," when Friendship 7 lifted off and Glenn became the first American to orbit the Earth, Feb. 20, 1962. Scott Carpenter was Glenn's backup pilot for that flight.
Three months later, May 24, 1962, Carpenter became the second American in orbit when he piloted his Aurora 7 capsule through three orbits around Earth.
"Scott was John's backup. Now John is his backup," Patty Carpenter said.
This past year Scott Carpenter celebrated the 50th anniversary of his Aurora 7 flight, when he became the fourth American in space, the second to orbit the Earth and the sixth man worldwide to leave the planet.

"God bless, Scott Carpenter," Glenn told Patty during one of their calls this week.
"I'm encouraged that he will recover with God's speed," Patty Carpenter said.

During his Mercury-Atlas 7 mission, Scott Carpenter circled the Earth three times. He was in space 4 hours and 56 minutes. He became the first American to eat solid food in space, energy snacks called Space Food Sticks, small square cubes composed of chocolate, figs and dates mixed with high-protein cereals.
He was selected in 1959 from more than 100 candidates to be one of the original Mercury 7 astronauts.
Aurora 7 was Scott Carpenter's only spaceflight. A motorcycle accident in 1964 left him with an injured left arm.

Astronaut to aquanaut
He moved from outer space to inner space when, in 1965, he became the first astronaut to become an aquanaut. He spent 30 days on board the Navy's Sealab II 1965, an experimental habitat in the Pacific Ocean off the coast of California.
Since Scott Carpenter's stint aboard Sealab, 38 astronauts have followed him into the ocean.
Scott Carpenter retired from the Navy in 1969 and pursued several private businesses, including one as a consultant for spaceflight and oceanography movies.
He has written two novels as well as a memoir titled "For Spacious Skies," his 2003 autobiography written with his daughter Kris Stoever.
Staff Writer Randy Wyrick can be reached at 970-748-2935 and rw­yr­i­ck[nospam-﹫-backwards]y­li­adliav­*c­om.

 
2013-09-29 08:37:34 PM  

cman: wildcardjack: [imgs.xkcd.com image 740x382]

The moon is a satellite, not a world


It's still an extra terrestrial body, and not many have walked on it.
 
2013-09-29 08:50:48 PM  
While sad, a stroke is no way for an astronaut to die. Wrecking your motorcycle at age 69 now that is a way for an astronaut to die.
 
2013-09-29 08:55:13 PM  

Tom_Slick: While sad, a stroke is no way for an astronaut to die. Wrecking your motorcycle at age 69 now that is a way for an astronaut to die.


He's not dead yet. And he had his motorcycle accident, which is one of the reasons why he only went up once. He just survived his, unlike Conrad.
 
2013-09-29 09:03:10 PM  

Flappyhead: cman: wildcardjack: [imgs.xkcd.com image 740x382]

The moon is a satellite, not a world

It's still an extra terrestrial body, and not many have walked on it.


"The universe is probably littered with the one-planet graves of cultures which made the sensible economic decision that there's no good reason to go into space--each discovered, studied, and remembered by the ones who made the irrational decision."  -alt text
 
2013-09-29 09:17:47 PM  

mark12A: No, he was America's FOURTH Astronaut, as in Shepard, Grissom, Glenn, then Carpenter. He was America's second astronaut in orbit. Him and Glenn were the clean living types, no wonder they're the oldest surviving.

And what's with the article? "Answer this question..." to see the rest of the text"? A whole new level of annoyance.

/space geek


Isn't it a bit more complicated than that? I thought that X-15 flights above a certain altitude counted (which would've made Armstrong an "earlier" astronaut than Shepard?)?
 
2013-09-29 09:23:57 PM  
Carpenter was a bit of a screw-up, which is why he only flew in space once. As I recall from Slayton's autobiography ("Deke!"), he repeatedly fell behind on his timeline and wasted attitude control fuel investigating what Glenn had called "fireflies" -- apparently just flecks of frost.

As a result he missed his retrofire by a few seconds and landed far off course (lucky to have lived, I gather, as he wasn't able to control capsule orientation as well as desired due to having wasted fuel). I believe Chris Kraft was widely quoted as saying "that son of a biatch isn't flying for me again" -- although he later denied it.
 
2013-09-29 09:26:20 PM  
At least he didn't burn up like the first of the Mercury seven to pass. Still, we do need to return to the Moon and also keep going further.
 
2013-09-29 09:38:23 PM  
www.spacetoday.org
atta good boy
 
2013-09-29 09:48:55 PM  
" a live mongrel dog named Laika (Barker in Russian) on a life-support system. Laika also was known as Kudryavka (Little Curly in Russian). The American press nicknamed the dog Muttnik.
 While other animals had made suborbital flights, Laika was the first animal to go into orbit. She suffered no ill effects while she was alive in an orbit at an altitude near 2,000 miles.
 Laika had been a stray dog - mostly a Siberian husky and around three years old - rounded up from the Moscow streets and trained for spaceflight. She was carried aloft in a capsule which remained attached to the converted SS-6 intercontinental ballistic missile which rocketed her to orbit.
 The 1,120-lb. Sputnik 2 was outfitted with scientific gauges, life-support systems, and padded walls, but was not designed for recovery. Laika was supported inside the satellite by a harness that allowed some movement and access to food and water. Electrodes transmitted vital signs including heartbeat, blood pressure and breathing rate.
 The American press nicknamed the dog Muttnik. She captured the hearts of people around the world as the batteries that operated her life-support system ran down and the capsule air ran out. Life slipped away from Laika a few days into her journey. Later, Sputnik 2 fell into the atmosphere and burned on April 14, 1958"

sad story bro and the start of earth animals including humans in space
 
2013-09-29 09:53:51 PM  
 
2013-09-29 10:11:58 PM  
si0.twimg.com

Oompa, Loompa, doom-pa-dee-doke
Scott Carpenter recently had a stroke
 
2013-09-29 10:29:02 PM  
wonders if it's ok to put some doo-doo in the capsule.

www.science-television.com
 
2013-09-29 10:44:23 PM  

Tom_Slick: While sad, a stroke is no way for an astronaut to die. Wrecking your motorcycle at age while in a 69 now that is a way for an astronaut to die.


Yee hawwww!!!

wildcardjack: Flappyhead: cman: wildcardjack: [imgs.xkcd.com image 740x382]

The moon is a satellite, not a world

It's still an extra terrestrial body, and not many have walked on it.

"The universe is probably littered with the one-planet graves of cultures which made the sensible economic decision that there's no good reason to go into space--each discovered, studied, and remembered by the ones who made the irrational decision."  -alt text


This planet is also littered with the fossils of organisms with short lifespans. The universe is probably littered with tin cans with dead organisms inside because they didn't take their version of Haloperidol or listen to their psychiatrists.
 
2013-09-29 11:15:00 PM  
Don't leave us yet :'(
 
2013-09-29 11:18:22 PM  

UNC_Samurai: No. We have to go back. And there's a simple reason why. Ask ten different scientists about the environment, population control, genetics, and you'll get ten different answers, but there's one thing every scientist on the planet agrees on. Whether it happens in a hundred years or a thousand years or a million years, eventually our Sun will grow cold and go out. When that happens, it won't just take us. It'll take Marilyn Monroe, and Lao-Tzu, and Einstein, and Morobuto, and Buddy Holly, and Aristophanes, and ― all of this ― all of this ― was for nothing. Unless we go to the stars.


JMS should be rated one of the better philosophers of modern time.
 
2013-09-29 11:26:45 PM  

cman: wildcardjack: [imgs.xkcd.com image 740x382]

The moon is a satellite, not a world

 
2013-09-29 11:44:48 PM  

UNC_Samurai: No. We have to go back. And there's a simple reason why. Ask ten different scientists about the environment, population control, genetics, and you'll get ten different answers, but there's one thing every scientist on the planet agrees on. Whether it happens in a hundred years or a thousand years or a million years, eventually our Sun will grow cold and go out. When that happens, it won't just take us. It'll take Marilyn Monroe, and Lao-Tzu, and Einstein, and Morobuto, and Buddy Holly, and Aristophanes, and - all of this - all of this - was for nothing. Unless we go to the stars.


And when you die they'll all be gone too, and you'll be gone too. That would be silly.
 
2013-09-30 12:43:57 AM  

cman: wildcardjack: [imgs.xkcd.com image 740x382]

The moon is a satellite, not a world


That's no moon!
 
2013-09-30 01:02:32 AM  
Um, there can be only one?
 
2013-09-30 01:04:03 AM  
I almost had a stroke myself just be seeing what these guys charge for a scribble on a glossy photo.

www.collectspace.com
 
2013-09-30 02:29:14 AM  
I don't want an autograph from anyone who would charge for an autograph.
 
2013-09-30 07:41:33 AM  

technoblogical: VAIL - It's John Glenn's turn to wish Scott Carpenter God speed.
Scott Carpenter, a longtime Vail local, suffered a stroke earlier this week.
Scott Carpenter, 88, and Glenn, 92, are the last living members of the Mercury 7 team, NASA's first team of astronauts. They talk almost every day and Glenn has been calling regularly since word of Scott Carpenter's stroke spread through the space community, said Patty Carpenter, Scott's wife.
"John has been one of Scott's greatest supporters," Patty said.
Scott Carpenter has been moved to rehab center specifically for stroke patients.
"The intention is to strengthen him so he can be up and around in several weeks," Patty Carpenter said.

God speed, John Glenn
Scott Carpenter is fondly remembered for his radio call "God speed, John Glenn," when Friendship 7 lifted off and Glenn became the first American to orbit the Earth, Feb. 20, 1962. Scott Carpenter was Glenn's backup pilot for that flight.
Three months later, May 24, 1962, Carpenter became the second American in orbit when he piloted his Aurora 7 capsule through three orbits around Earth.
"Scott was John's backup. Now John is his backup," Patty Carpenter said.
This past year Scott Carpenter celebrated the 50th anniversary of his Aurora 7 flight, when he became the fourth American in space, the second to orbit the Earth and the sixth man worldwide to leave the planet.
"God bless, Scott Carpenter," Glenn told Patty during one of their calls this week.
"I'm encouraged that he will recover with God's speed," Patty Carpenter said.
During his Mercury-Atlas 7 mission, Scott Carpenter circled the Earth three times. He was in space 4 hours and 56 minutes. He became the first American to eat solid food in space, energy snacks called Space Food Sticks, small square cubes composed of chocolate, figs and dates mixed with high-protein cereals.
He was selected in 1959 from more than 100 candidates to be one of the original Mercury 7 astronauts.
Aurora 7 was Scott Carpenter's only sp ...


To be fair, Carpenter did a shiat job of following the mission plan and then blamed his off-target landing on Mission Control. That pretty much guaranteed he would never fly again.
 
2013-09-30 08:39:08 AM  

UNC_Samurai: No. We have to go back. And there's a simple reason why. Ask ten different scientists about the environment, population control, genetics, and you'll get ten different answers, but there's one thing every scientist on the planet agrees on. Whether it happens in a hundred years or a thousand years or a million years, eventually our Sun will grow cold and go out. When that happens, it won't just take us. It'll take Marilyn Monroe, and Lao-Tzu, and Einstein, and Morobuto, and Buddy Holly, and Aristophanes, and - all of this - all of this - was for nothing. Unless we go to the stars.


furiousfanboys.com

Sees what you did there.
 
2013-09-30 10:29:55 AM  

TV's Vinnie: I almost had a stroke myself just be seeing what these guys charge for a scribble on a glossy photo.

[www.collectspace.com image 800x530]


They were test pilots for f's sake. What about the people who designed and built their tin cans?
 
2013-09-30 10:45:40 AM  

AndreMA: mark12A: No, he was America's FOURTH Astronaut, as in Shepard, Grissom, Glenn, then Carpenter. He was America's second astronaut in orbit. Him and Glenn were the clean living types, no wonder they're the oldest surviving.

And what's with the article? "Answer this question..." to see the rest of the text"? A whole new level of annoyance.

/space geek

Isn't it a bit more complicated than that? I thought that X-15 flights above a certain altitude counted (which would've made Armstrong an "earlier" astronaut than Shepard?)?


Nope, Armstrong didn't fly high enough with the X-15 but it really depends on how you define where space begins. Especially with every farking news agency thinking all you need to send something to space is a high altitude balloon. Nope. The generally accepted definition is 100 km (62 miles), but NASA gave out astronaut badges in the 60's as long as you flew above 80.4672 km (50 miles).

So we'll stick with the 100 km definition because again its what is generally accepted worldwide. Which would make Joseph A. Walker the only astronaut among the X-15 lot. So the first 21 people into space looks like this.

 1: Yuri Gagarin:USSR:Vostok 1 
 2: Alan Shepard:USA:Mercury 3 
 3: Virgil Grissom:USA:Mercury 4 
 4: Gherman Titov:USSR:Vostok 2
 5: John Glenn:USA:Mercury 6
 6: Scott Carpenter:USA:Mercury 7 
 7: Andrian Nikolaev:USSR:Vostok 3 
 8: Pavel Popovich:USSR:Vostok 4
 9: Walter Schirra:USA:Mercury 8
10: Gordon Cooper:USA:Mercury 9 
11: Valeri Bykovski:USSR:Vostok 5
12: Valentina Tereshkova:USSR:Vostok 6
13: Joseph Walker:USA:X-15, Flight 90 
14: Vladimir Komarov:USSR:Voskhod 1 
15: Konstantin Feoktistov:USSR:Voskhod 1 
16: Boris Yegorov:USSR:Voskhod 1 
17: Pavel Belayaev:USSR:Voskhod 2 
18: Alexei Leonov(First EVA ever):USSR:Voskhod 2
19: John Young:USA:Gemini 3 
20: James McDivitt:USA:Gemini 4
21: Edward White(Second EVA ever):USA:Gemini 4
 
2013-09-30 02:18:42 PM  
The Seven were cool. Too cool. They were the rockstars of their age, even Glenn and Carpenter. When it came time for Apollo it was decided to minimize the rockstar, that's why only Shepard went to the moon. And that's why Neil -farking-Armstrong was first.

Grissom also died in Apollo 1, so the non-clean living thing really didn't get him.
 
2013-09-30 03:36:22 PM  

trotsky: The Seven were cool. Too cool. They were the rockstars of their age, even Glenn and Carpenter. When it came time for Apollo it was decided to minimize the rockstar, that's why only Shepard went to the moon. And that's why Neil -farking-Armstrong was first.

Grissom also died in Apollo 1, so the non-clean living thing really didn't get him.



By 1969, four of the seven Mercury astronauts were medically unqualified: Grissom (death), Carpenter (arm), Slayton (heart), & Shepard (inner ear) - the latter two of whom were later reinstated
One (Glenn) had been elected to the U.S. Senate.
One (Schirra) had already had his fill and submitted his retirement, effective after Apollo 7 and becoming the first astronaut to go into space thrice.

Only Cooper was still in astronaut status, but he got into a pissing contest with NASA bosses who grounded him. Would he have made it to the Moon if Shepard had not gotten his ear fixed and thus been a Mercury astronaut to go to the Moon?  No way to know.  The fact is, though, that he screwed his own pooch.


OK, trivia time:

We all know that, depending upon your definition, either Schmitt or Cernan is the last man to walk on the Moon. (i.e., last to step onto it, or last to step off of it, respectively)

Depending upon your definition, there are three answers to "Who was the last Mercury astronaut to go into space.":
Gordon Cooper - flew last Mercury mission
Deke Slayton - last Mercury astronaut to finally get into space.
John Glenn - Mercury astronaut who flew into space.most recently.

*If we count postumous, then Cooper also gets it for having a tiny amount of his cremains launched into space, after Glenn's space shuttle mission.
 
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