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(Bay News 9)   Boaters see a waterspout. Do they: A) turn 180 degrees and try to outrun it? b) oh, c'mon, you see the Florida tag and know how this ends... (w/video)   (baynews9.com) divider line 52
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12857 clicks; posted to Main » on 28 Sep 2013 at 4:30 PM (29 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-09-28 04:40:39 PM
"It's up to me, when I'm doing this, to assess the situation whether or not it's an acceptable risk or not

so we are not required to save your dumb ass?
 
2013-09-28 04:42:25 PM
Unfortunately, no d-bags were harmed in the making of this video either.
 
2013-09-28 04:42:47 PM

one-in-the-chamber: "It's up to me, when I'm doing this, to assess the situation whether or not it's an acceptable risk or not

so we are not required to save your dumb ass?


not as dumb as the land strom chasers
 
2013-09-28 04:45:09 PM

haywatchthis: one-in-the-chamber: "It's up to me, when I'm doing this, to assess the situation whether or not it's an acceptable risk or not

so we are not required to save your dumb ass?

not as dumb as the land strom chasers


Or whomever wrote that headline.
 
2013-09-28 04:45:50 PM
Charles Darwin was never good at stickball. Swing and a miss.
 
2013-09-28 04:49:26 PM
First half of the video - dog standing on the bow.
Second half of the video - dog moves down into the well.

Conclusion: of the three life forms in the boat, the dog is the smartest.
 
2013-09-28 04:51:42 PM

StrikitRich: haywatchthis: one-in-the-chamber: "It's up to me, when I'm doing this, to assess the situation whether or not it's an acceptable risk or not

so we are not required to save your dumb ass?

not as dumb as the land strom chasers

Or whomever wrote that headline.


*whoever

/not Subby
 
2013-09-28 04:53:21 PM
A little math problem for you subby...

If an object at 1 mile is approaching directly at you on an opposing course at 30 knots and you turn 180 degrees to evade it at 20 knots, how long before your boat is pounded into jetsam.

Show your work.
 
2013-09-28 04:55:32 PM

AngryDragon: A little math problem for you subby...

If an object at 1 mile is approaching directly at you on an opposing course at 30 knots and you turn 180 degrees to evade it at 20 knots, how long before your boat is pounded into jetsam.

Show your work.


We were told there would be no math!
 
2013-09-28 04:56:44 PM

one-in-the-chamber: "It's up to me, when I'm doing this, to assess the situation whether or not it's an acceptable risk or not

so we are not required to save your dumb ass?


what about the dog you have tied to the boat? does he have a vote in all this?
 
2013-09-28 04:57:52 PM

AngryDragon: A little math problem for you subby...

If an object at 1 mile is approaching directly at you on an opposing course at 30 knots and you turn 180 degrees to evade it at 20 knots, how long before your boat is pounded into jetsam.

Show your work.


depends on the distance between the boat and the object at the beginning of said scenario
 
2013-09-28 05:01:33 PM
Well, that sucks.
 
2013-09-28 05:01:58 PM
What an unfortunate ending.
 
2013-09-28 05:02:49 PM

Hobodeluxe: AngryDragon: A little math problem for you subby...

If an object at 1 mile is approaching directly at you on an opposing course at 30 knots and you turn 180 degrees to evade it at 20 knots, how long before your boat is pounded into jetsam.

Show your work.

depends on the distance between the boat and the object at the beginning of said scenario


oops you said one mile. sorry I missed that.
anyway the difference is 10 knots in speed 10 knots is 8.7mph approx. so 5.2 min or so.
 
2013-09-28 05:03:13 PM

Hobodeluxe: AngryDragon: A little math problem for you subby...

If an object at 1 mile is approaching directly at you on an opposing course at 30 knots and you turn 180 degrees to evade it at 20 knots, how long before your boat is pounded into jetsam.

Show your work.

depends on the distance between the boat and the object at the beginning of said scenario


Also that boat should be able to break 30 knots.  Maybe not by much though.
 
2013-09-28 05:03:59 PM
Those were very weak as far as waterspouts go.  Personally I have been more worried about the possibility of lightening.
 
2013-09-28 05:04:46 PM

AngryDragon: A little math problem for you subby...

If an object at 1 mile is approaching directly at you on an opposing course at 30 knots and you turn 180 degrees to evade it at 20 knots, how long before your boat is pounded into jetsam.

Show your work.


Why would you turn 180 degrees? Wouldn't going off on a diagonal line to the heading of the water spout give you more distance?
 
2013-09-28 05:06:14 PM

vodka: Those were very weak as far as waterspouts go.  Personally I have been more worried about the possibility of lightening.


Absolutely. Too much lightening, and they would have certainly floated into the spout.
 
2013-09-28 05:08:38 PM

vodka: Those were very weak as far as waterspouts go.  Personally I have been more worried about the possibility of lightening.


basically a dust devil only with water instead of dirt.
 
2013-09-28 05:17:47 PM

AngryDragon: A little math problem for you subby...

If an object at 1 mile is approaching directly at you on an opposing course at 30 knots and you turn 180 degrees to evade it at 20 knots, how long before your boat is pounded into jetsam.

Show your work.


11 minutes? baked, not subby.
 
2013-09-28 05:21:34 PM

Hobodeluxe: vodka: Those were very weak as far as waterspouts go.  Personally I have been more worried about the possibility of lightening.

basically a dust devil only with water instead of dirt.


As I understand it, and I may or may not be full of shiat, but aren't most water spouts just that? A lot of show, not a lot of power and what looks like water being sucked up is actually more of a cloud of condensation.
 
2013-09-28 05:30:03 PM
Does anyone turn into a lumberjack at the end?
Steering your boat into the storm does that to people.
 
2013-09-28 05:31:07 PM

AngryDragon: A little math problem for you subby...

If an object at 1 mile is approaching directly at you on an opposing course at 30 knots and you turn 180 degrees to evade it at 20 knots, how long before your boat is pounded into jetsam.

Show your work.


Never, unless your boat can turn 180% on a sinking dime.
 
2013-09-28 05:32:21 PM

vodka: Those were very weak as far as waterspouts go.  Personally I have been more worried about the possibility of lightening.


This^

/you don't want to be the tallest object out on the water
 
2013-09-28 05:35:52 PM

Cerebral Knievel: Hobodeluxe: vodka: Those were very weak as far as waterspouts go.  Personally I have been more worried about the possibility of lightening.

basically a dust devil only with water instead of dirt.

As I understand it, and I may or may not be full of shiat, but aren't most water spouts just that? A lot of show, not a lot of power and what looks like water being sucked up is actually more of a cloud of condensation.


A true waterspout is non-tornadic and is not associated with a rotating thunderstorm.  They are generally like dust-devils but can sometimes be a little stronger.  There are also tornadic waterspouts, which really should not be called waterspouts at all but often are, that can be just as dangerous as a land tornado.

I can't watch the video right now, so I can't say which this was.  Either way I would probably steer clear of them if I was in a small boat.
 
2013-09-28 05:39:18 PM

Red Shirt Blues: AngryDragon: A little math problem for you subby...

If an object at 1 mile is approaching directly at you on an opposing course at 30 knots and you turn 180 degrees to evade it at 20 knots, how long before your boat is pounded into jetsam.

Show your work.

Why would you turn 180 degrees? Wouldn't going off on a diagonal line to the heading of the water spout give you more distance?


t.qkme.me
 
2013-09-28 05:41:15 PM

Hobodeluxe: vodka: Those were very weak as far as waterspouts go.  Personally I have been more worried about the possibility of lightening.

basically a dust devil only with water instead of dirt.


I walked through a huge dust devil once while in the desert near Yuma, AZ, with the Army on a field exercise.

It was about as wide as three or four semi trailers set end-to-end the long way.  And a better name for them would be "rock devils."  Thankfully, I was wearing my kevlar helmet and desert goggles.  The swirling rocks banged me up pretty good.  I had plate-sized bruises all over my body.  On the plus side, the other soldiers in my battalion gave me the nickname "Lieutenant Balls" after they saw me walking calmly out of the dust devil, completely unaware that it was ripping twenty-foot tall mesquite trees right up out of the ground behind me.

When the battalion CO called me into his office to yell at me, he asked me why I did it.  All I could say was that I always wondered what it was like inside a dust devil, and it seemed like that would be my one chance to find out.  He thought about it for a second, and then instead of yelling at me he asked "so, what was it like?"  I said "dusty."

(In fact, a better description would have been that had been actually quite dark, and very noisy.  I had hoped that there would have been an "eye" in the middle where I could have looked up and seen blue sky, but in fact it was dark, dusty and full of flying debris all the way through.  A bit of an adrenaline rush while I was in there, though.  I have to admit that.)
 
2013-09-28 05:41:46 PM

vodka: Those were very weak as far as waterspouts go.  Personally I have been more worried about the possibility of lightening.

flying sharks.
 
2013-09-28 05:45:50 PM

tillerman35: Hobodeluxe: vodka: Those were very weak as far as waterspouts go.  Personally I have been more worried about the possibility of lightening.

basically a dust devil only with water instead of dirt.

I walked through a huge dust devil once while in the desert near Yuma, AZ, with the Army on a field exercise.

It was about as wide as three or four semi trailers set end-to-end the long way.  And a better name for them would be "rock devils."  Thankfully, I was wearing my kevlar helmet and desert goggles.  The swirling rocks banged me up pretty good.  I had plate-sized bruises all over my body.  On the plus side, the other soldiers in my battalion gave me the nickname "Lieutenant Balls" after they saw me walking calmly out of the dust devil, completely unaware that it was ripping twenty-foot tall mesquite trees right up out of the ground behind me.

When the battalion CO called me into his office to yell at me, he asked me why I did it.  All I could say was that I always wondered what it was like inside a dust devil, and it seemed like that would be my one chance to find out.  He thought about it for a second, and then instead of yelling at me he asked "so, what was it like?"  I said "dusty."

(In fact, a better description would have been that had been actually quite dark, and very noisy.  I had hoped that there would have been an "eye" in the middle where I could have looked up and seen blue sky, but in fact it was dark, dusty and full of flying debris all the way through.  A bit of an adrenaline rush while I was in there, though.  I have to admit that.)


I have nothing to add except I love stories like this.
 
2013-09-28 06:03:56 PM
I was on a cruise ship 2 years ago and saw two way off in the horizon while I was on a back deck eating breakfast.  The weather otherwise was very nice.
 
2013-09-28 06:08:47 PM
The answer is C) you turn 360 degrees and leave the area immediately
 
2013-09-28 06:09:16 PM

Sliding Carp: vodka: Those were very weak as far as waterspouts go.  Personally I have been more worried about the possibility of lightening.flying sharks.


With friggen laser!
 
2013-09-28 06:09:23 PM

Red Shirt Blues: AngryDragon: A little math problem for you subby...

If an object at 1 mile is approaching directly at you on an opposing course at 30 knots and you turn 180 degrees to evade it at 20 knots, how long before your boat is pounded into jetsam.

Show your work.

Why would you turn 180 degrees? Wouldn't going off on a diagonal line to the heading of the water spout give you more distance?


Subby sucks at angles and pursuit (think of a linebacker catching up with a running back downfield)
 
2013-09-28 06:11:12 PM
I'm sure this video was a little too short, and stout boaters handled their craft well near the spout, while teeing up a great news item for my pot-smoking Farkers here.
 
2013-09-28 06:14:13 PM

vodka: Those were very weak as far as waterspouts go.  Personally I have been more worried about the possibility of lightening.


Are you Michael Jackson?
 
2013-09-28 06:15:16 PM

Old Huntstein: StrikitRich: haywatchthis: one-in-the-chamber: "It's up to me, when I'm doing this, to assess the situation whether or not it's an acceptable risk or not

so we are not required to save your dumb ass?

not as dumb as the land strom chasers

Or whomever wrote that headline.

*whoever

/not Subby


Pet peeve, eh?
 
2013-09-28 06:29:19 PM

helper_monkey: Cerebral Knievel: Hobodeluxe: vodka: Those were very weak as far as waterspouts go.  Personally I have been more worried about the possibility of lightening.

basically a dust devil only with water instead of dirt.

As I understand it, and I may or may not be full of shiat, but aren't most water spouts just that? A lot of show, not a lot of power and what looks like water being sucked up is actually more of a cloud of condensation.

A true waterspout is non-tornadic and is not associated with a rotating thunderstorm.  They are generally like dust-devils but can sometimes be a little stronger.  There are also tornadic waterspouts, which really should not be called waterspouts at all but often are, that can be just as dangerous as a land tornado.

I can't watch the video right now, so I can't say which this was.  Either way I would probably steer clear of them if I was in a small boat.


yeah, yer pretty much backing up what I know about them. I'm somewhat freindly with one of the local weather people here in town and when all the local news channels were flipping about some water spouts off the coast here I was somewhat blown off for pointing out on the facebook feed, that they(waterspouts) aint no big thang.

Tornadic waterspouts are very rare, particuarly in this part of the world,  the closest thing you will get to a tornadic water spout in much of the western hemisphere is a regular land tornado going over a body of water
 
2013-09-28 06:36:25 PM
anyone else hear the guy in the video? "oh look there is a debris cloud" it's over water.  other than the possibility of flying sharks what else would it be slinging around besides water.
 
2013-09-28 06:38:35 PM

cycle23: vodka: Those were very weak as far as waterspouts go.  Personally I have been more worried about the possibility of lightening.

Absolutely. Too much lightening, and they would have certainly floated into the spout.


Shortening would be better. They'd stick to the water.
 
2013-09-28 06:56:37 PM

Clutch2013: tillerman35: Hobodeluxe: vodka: Those were very weak as far as waterspouts go.  Personally I have been more worried about the possibility of lightening.

basically a dust devil only with water instead of dirt.

I walked through a huge dust devil once while in the desert near Yuma, AZ, with the Army on a field exercise.

It was about as wide as three or four semi trailers set end-to-end the long way.  And a better name for them would be "rock devils."  Thankfully, I was wearing my kevlar helmet and desert goggles.  The swirling rocks banged me up pretty good.  I had plate-sized bruises all over my body.  On the plus side, the other soldiers in my battalion gave me the nickname "Lieutenant Balls" after they saw me walking calmly out of the dust devil, completely unaware that it was ripping twenty-foot tall mesquite trees right up out of the ground behind me.

When the battalion CO called me into his office to yell at me, he asked me why I did it.  All I could say was that I always wondered what it was like inside a dust devil, and it seemed like that would be my one chance to find out.  He thought about it for a second, and then instead of yelling at me he asked "so, what was it like?"  I said "dusty."

(In fact, a better description would have been that had been actually quite dark, and very noisy.  I had hoped that there would have been an "eye" in the middle where I could have looked up and seen blue sky, but in fact it was dark, dusty and full of flying debris all the way through.  A bit of an adrenaline rush while I was in there, though.  I have to admit that.)

I have nothing to add except I love stories like this.


This came to mind after I read it:

  i1.ytimg.com
 
2013-09-28 06:58:39 PM
According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration website, a waterspout falls into two categories:
"Tornadic waterspouts are tornadoes that form over water, or move from land to water. They have the same characteristics as a land tornado. They are associated with severe thunderstorms, and are often accompanied by high winds and seas, large hail, and frequent dangerous lightning.
Fair weather waterspouts usually form along the dark flat base of a line of developing cumulus clouds. This type of waterspout is generally not associated with thunderstorms. While tornadic waterspouts develop downward in a thunderstorm, a fair weather waterspout develops on the surface of the water and works its way upward. By the time the funnel is visible, a fair weather waterspout is near maturity. Fair weather waterspouts form in light wind conditions so they normally move very little.
If a waterspout moves onshore, the National Weather Service issues a tornado warning, as some of them can cause significant damage and injuries to people. Typically, fair weather waterspouts dissipate rapidly when they make landfall, and rarely penetrate far inland."
For more information, vist the NOAA website at: http://oceanservice.noaa.gov/facts/waterspout.html.
 
2013-09-28 07:15:07 PM
I was kind of hoping to get an aerial view.
 
2013-09-28 07:22:47 PM
Without people like this I guess we wouldn't know our limits
 
2013-09-28 07:57:41 PM

helper_monkey: Cerebral Knievel: Hobodeluxe: vodka: Those were very weak as far as waterspouts go.  Personally I have been more worried about the possibility of lightening.

basically a dust devil only with water instead of dirt.

As I understand it, and I may or may not be full of shiat, but aren't most water spouts just that? A lot of show, not a lot of power and what looks like water being sucked up is actually more of a cloud of condensation.

A true waterspout is non-tornadic and is not associated with a rotating thunderstorm.  They are generally like dust-devils but can sometimes be a little stronger.  There are also tornadic waterspouts, which really should not be called waterspouts at all but often are, that can be just as dangerous as a land tornado.

I can't watch the video right now, so I can't say which this was.  Either way I would probably steer clear of them if I was in a small boat.


What about a kayak? I was in my kayak a few months ago when a waterspout formed about a 1/2 mile from us. Caught it from start to finish.
Its on youtube, search for Tampa waterspout kayak
 
2013-09-28 09:25:52 PM

GungFu: Does anyone turn into a lumberjack at the end?
Steering your boat into the storm does that to people.


 c'mon, you see the Florida tag and know how this ends ..


...wait.
 
2013-09-28 09:58:00 PM

apacheco: Without people like this I guess we wouldn't know our limits


You're only a hero if you succeed; otherwise, you're an idiot. There's really no middle ground on such things.
 
2013-09-28 10:28:02 PM

tillerman35: I walked through a huge dust devil once while in the desert near Yuma, AZ, with the Army on a field exercise.


I saw a exhibit of work done by a video artist who did basically the exact thing, except he had a video camera with him and wasn't wearing armor. I don't think there were as many rocks flying around as your experience, but the camera only lasted a few seconds before it started spitting wonky pixels all over the place. I don't think high-end video equipment likes high-speed dust very much. You could still watch it all the way through, and when he emerged he put the camera down and his face was all scratched up and filthy.

I tried to find it on-line, but my google-fu was weak.
 
2013-09-28 11:03:42 PM

GungFu: Does anyone turn into a lumberjack at the end?
Steering your boat into the storm does that to people.


Came for this, Can leave happy.
 
2013-09-28 11:37:50 PM
Water spouts are generally weak wind storms. I enjoy all these comments from people who have probably never seen the ocean.
 
2013-09-29 07:24:03 AM

a particular individual: According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration website, a waterspout falls into two categories:
"Tornadic waterspouts are tornadoes that form over water, or move from land to water. They have the same characteristics as a land tornado. They are associated with severe thunderstorms, and are often accompanied by high winds and seas, large hail, and frequent dangerous lightning.
Fair weather waterspouts usually form along the dark flat base of a line of developing cumulus clouds. This type of waterspout is generally not associated with thunderstorms. While tornadic waterspouts develop downward in a thunderstorm, a fair weather waterspout develops on the surface of the water and works its way upward. By the time the funnel is visible, a fair weather waterspout is near maturity. Fair weather waterspouts form in light wind conditions so they normally move very little.
If a waterspout moves onshore, the National Weather Service issues a tornado warning, as some of them can cause significant damage and injuries to people. Typically, fair weather waterspouts dissipate rapidly when they make landfall, and rarely penetrate far inland."
For more information, vist the NOAA website at: http://oceanservice.noaa.gov/facts/waterspout.html.


Thanks for this, because I wanted to revisit this thread and ask "when do you stop calling it a waterspout and call it a tornado"
 
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