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(US News)   Military moves into Bangladesh after garment workers go on strike, demanding minimum wage of $104 ... a month   (usnews.com) divider line 27
    More: Followup, Bangladesh, late-2000s recession, minimum wages, Bangladeshi, wages  
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753 clicks; posted to Business » on 28 Sep 2013 at 10:17 AM (40 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



27 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-09-28 08:27:08 AM
"Bangladesh Garment Workers Continue Protest for Lower Wages"

Headline amuses me. Personally, I would like to make higher wages.
 
2013-09-28 09:23:41 AM

Peepeye: "Bangladesh Garment Workers Continue Protest for Lower Wages"

Headline amuses me. Personally, I would like to make higher wages.


When you outsource to China, you get what you pay for
 
2013-09-28 10:36:42 AM
Businesses hate freedom unless they are the sole possessors of it in a given area.
 
2013-09-28 10:40:57 AM
Gee, I wonder what the phrase "cost of living" means...
 
2013-09-28 10:54:25 AM
At the rate things are going in the US, I wouldn't be surprised if this will be us in another decade or so.
 
2013-09-28 11:02:16 AM
H&M's response was to lobby the government to raise the minimum wage, rather than raise wages on its own.

so H&M is only willing to raise its costs if its competitors take the hit too.

Yep, that's some moral high ground you've got there.
 
2013-09-28 11:10:44 AM
So now it's not just wage slaves. It's wage slaves swinging on the end of bayonets.

God, I LOVE capitalism and its biatch government.
 
2013-09-28 11:12:17 AM
FTA: The protests began as a means to force garment factories to   from $40 a month to $100 a month.

Those greedy bastards, come to America and work fast food, live like millionaires.
 
2013-09-28 11:22:25 AM
Good.

You really think the 3rd world is going to stay that way forever? You were in trouble as soon as you started selling internet access and cheap computers, capitalists. Now they know how everybody else lives.

Satellite TV played a really big part in the Iron Curtain folding, internet's that X10.
 
2013-09-28 11:27:09 AM

Skunkwolf: You really think the 3rd world is going to stay that way forever?


Yup.
 
2013-09-28 11:27:37 AM
Meanwhile, the average American wage is $12 an hour.
Enjoy your globalism, suckers.
 
2013-09-28 11:32:07 AM

HotIgneous Intruder: Meanwhile, the average American wage is $12 an hour.
Enjoy your globalism, suckers.


upload.wikimedia.org

Seems low for the average. Median? Yeah, I'd find that likely.
 
2013-09-28 12:10:07 PM
It's about $50K per household now, which is two incomes of about $12 an hour.
Googly googly.
 
2013-09-28 12:12:14 PM

Skunkwolf: Good.

You really think the 3rd world is going to stay that way forever? You were in trouble as soon as you started selling internet access and cheap computers, capitalists. Now they know how everybody else lives.

Satellite TV played a really big part in the Iron Curtain folding, internet's that X10.


Except that's backwards. They have internet to learn about the rest of the world because living standards are already rising. Part of that path is through a sweatshop economy, which is the bottom rung on the ladder of economic development. You start with cheap manufacturing, build infrastructure and a skilled workforce, which allows you to produce more efficiently and raise prices. Eventually you blend in higher quality and higher tech. It worked for Korea, it' working for China, and it'll work for Bangladesh. Hell, even England went through much the same thing. A lot of it's ugly, like sweatshop labour and lack of workers rights, but it's better than what came before and over time social and economic progress allows better conditions.
 
2013-09-28 12:14:44 PM

neon_god: Skunkwolf: Good.

You really think the 3rd world is going to stay that way forever? You were in trouble as soon as you started selling internet access and cheap computers, capitalists. Now they know how everybody else lives.

Satellite TV played a really big part in the Iron Curtain folding, internet's that X10.

Except that's backwards. They have internet to learn about the rest of the world because living standards are already rising. Part of that path is through a sweatshop economy, which is the bottom rung on the ladder of economic development. You start with cheap manufacturing, build infrastructure and a skilled workforce, which allows you to produce more efficiently and raise prices. Eventually you blend in higher quality and higher tech. It worked for Korea, it' working for China, and it'll work for Bangladesh. Hell, even England went through much the same thing. A lot of it's ugly, like sweatshop labour and lack of workers rights, but it's better than what came before and over time social and economic progress allows better conditions.


Except that the result is a decrease in quality of life for the developed nations
 
2013-09-28 12:23:10 PM

Warlordtrooper: neon_god: Skunkwolf: Good.

You really think the 3rd world is going to stay that way forever? You were in trouble as soon as you started selling internet access and cheap computers, capitalists. Now they know how everybody else lives.

Satellite TV played a really big part in the Iron Curtain folding, internet's that X10.

Except that's backwards. They have internet to learn about the rest of the world because living standards are already rising. Part of that path is through a sweatshop economy, which is the bottom rung on the ladder of economic development. You start with cheap manufacturing, build infrastructure and a skilled workforce, which allows you to produce more efficiently and raise prices. Eventually you blend in higher quality and higher tech. It worked for Korea, it' working for China, and it'll work for Bangladesh. Hell, even England went through much the same thing. A lot of it's ugly, like sweatshop labour and lack of workers rights, but it's better than what came before and over time social and economic progress allows better conditions.

Except that the result is a decrease in quality of life for the developed nations


You think quality of life is lower today in Korea than in the 60s? Or lower in China than in the 70s? Bullshiat.

I meant to include in my last post, by the way, that I'm not against the strikers. They deserve the money and definitely don't deserve to be put down by the army. But the notion that capitalism keeps third world workers down is dangerously misinformed. Capitalism is a necessary component of development
 
2013-09-28 12:33:15 PM
$104/mo?  That's what an Olympic athlete makes in Cuba.  They should protest  for lower wages.
 
2013-09-28 12:43:51 PM

neon_god: Skunkwolf: Good.

You really think the 3rd world is going to stay that way forever? You were in trouble as soon as you started selling internet access and cheap computers, capitalists. Now they know how everybody else lives.

Satellite TV played a really big part in the Iron Curtain folding, internet's that X10.

Except that's backwards. They have internet to learn about the rest of the world because living standards are already rising. Part of that path is through a sweatshop economy, which is the bottom rung on the ladder of economic development. You start with cheap manufacturing, build infrastructure and a skilled workforce, which allows you to produce more efficiently and raise prices. Eventually you blend in higher quality and higher tech. It worked for Korea, it' working for China, and it'll work for Bangladesh. Hell, even England went through much the same thing. A lot of it's ugly, like sweatshop labour and lack of workers rights, but it's better than what came before and over time social and economic progress allows better conditions.


problem is with Bangladesh is that it is taking too long for the lower classes to see the benefits.

despite GDP tripling since 2000,  Bangladesh is number 1 in the world for child hunger, with half of preschool age children suffering from anemia.

the government was not revising minimum wages for up to 28 years at a time, despite high inflation. in 2010 the min wage in garment industry was raised 81% to where it is now, $37 a month. food price Inflation this year is running at 12%.

http://www.sify.com/news/no-minimum-wages-in-34-industries-in-bangla de sh-news-international-ki0pabgibdc.html
 
2013-09-28 01:58:10 PM

neon_god: A lot of it's ugly, like sweatshop labour and lack of workers rights, but it's better than what came before and over time social and economic progress allows better conditions.


Avoiding that and using First World standards would do the same thing, and also gives freedom for all parties involved.  Your method only excuses lesser freedom for uncertain gains.
 
2013-09-28 02:00:17 PM

neon_god: Part of that path is meeting the First World level of labor standards, which is the bottom rung on the ladder of economic development.


FTFY.
 
2013-09-28 02:31:45 PM
$104/month!  Good lord, I bet some of them even have refrigerators.  They are living in the lap of luxury over there.  I hope the army steps in a rifle butts our slaves back to work so I can still have my Nikes.
 
2013-09-28 03:28:25 PM

rosebud_the_sled: $104/month!  Good lord, I bet some of them even have refrigerators.  They are living in the lap of luxury over there.  I hope the army steps in a rifle butts our slaves back to work so I can still have my Nikes.


I bought jeans which I noticed afterward were made in Africa (Lesotho) - so I think that Bangladesh, like China, is probably losing manufacturing jobs to lower-wage countries.
 
2013-09-28 08:05:24 PM
adland.tv
But H&M ads can be great at times....
 
2013-09-29 12:41:55 AM
Dammit I'm not paying more than $34.99 for my Banana Republic v-neck tee.
 
2013-09-29 02:17:18 AM
According to Tom Freidman, NYTimes Columnist, that $104/month wage is not the reason why Americans, at $10/hour or 1600/month can't compete.  It's the American's lack of education.  Freidman is serious about this.  He thinks American corporations took factory job to places like Bangladesh, where they'd save at least 1300/month per worker, not to mention the lack of OSHA rules and regulations, because they couldn't find qualified workers.  Idiot.
 
2013-09-29 07:06:47 AM

Flash_NYC: According to Tom Freidman, NYTimes Columnist, that $104/month wage is not the reason why Americans, at $10/hour or 1600/month can't compete.  It's the American's lack of education.  Freidman is serious about this.  He thinks American corporations took factory job to places like Bangladesh, where they'd save at least 1300/month per worker, not to mention the lack of OSHA rules and regulations, because they couldn't find qualified workers.  Idiot.


It's not an unreasonable theory. In America (in general) qualified workers don't want to work the job they are qualified for. We tend to look upon people who truly work for a living as not having lived up to their "potential." We call their professions "menial labor." They are constantly taunted with advertising for items they don't need and could never afford. This has also led to an entitlement mentality where (still in general terms) any real work is "beneath them."
 
2013-09-29 12:51:20 PM

Kyosuke: Flash_NYC: According to Tom Freidman, NYTimes Columnist, that $104/month wage is not the reason why Americans, at $10/hour or 1600/month can't compete.  It's the American's lack of education.  Freidman is serious about this.  He thinks American corporations took factory job to places like Bangladesh, where they'd save at least 1300/month per worker, not to mention the lack of OSHA rules and regulations, because they couldn't find qualified workers.  Idiot.

It's not an unreasonable theory. In America (in general) qualified workers don't want to work the job they are qualified for. We tend to look upon people who truly work for a living as not having lived up to their "potential." We call their professions "menial labor." They are constantly taunted with advertising for items they don't need and could never afford. This has also led to an entitlement mentality where (still in general terms) any real work is "beneath them."


That's why I'll never talk down about certain jobs to my kids.  The garbage man, mechanic, water treatment plant worker, miner, power plant worker, assembly line worker, construction worker, fireman, solider, farmer, plumber, HVAC technician, and lumberjack are far more valuable to society than a lot of professions that come to mind.
 
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