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(ABC)   Inconvenient: 737 pilot suffers in-flight heart attack that ultimately proves fatal. Convenient: co-pilot gets help landing from a passenger who just happens to train 737 pilots for a living   (abcnews.go.com) divider line 99
    More: Hero, emergency landing, heart attacks, KOMO, trains, passengers, landing  
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8713 clicks; posted to Main » on 28 Sep 2013 at 2:17 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-09-27 10:51:34 PM  
Good luck, we're all counting on you.
 
2013-09-28 12:22:30 AM  
It didn't happen that way
 
2013-09-28 12:26:37 AM  
My wife said it seems like there's always one passenger on the plane who's a pilot and can help fly.

I suggested that yeah, people in the industry fly for cheap or free, so it's not uncommon for them to be taking a flight to work or whatever.

She didn't accept that answer, and thinks it's deliberate, kind of like the Federal Air Marshals, and that they actually plan it so every flight has a pilot aboard as a passenger.  Yay, I married a conspiracy theorist. :)
 
2013-09-28 12:30:30 AM  

dbirchall: My wife said it seems like there's always one passenger on the plane who's a pilot and can help fly.

I suggested that yeah, people in the industry fly for cheap or free, so it's not uncommon for them to be taking a flight to work or whatever.

She didn't accept that answer, and thinks it's deliberate, kind of like the Federal Air Marshals, and that they actually plan it so every flight has a pilot aboard as a passenger.  Yay, I married a conspiracy theorist. :)


There IS always a passenger who's a pilot and land the plane... they call him the co-pilot. I don't know how much things have changed in the industry over the past decade or so, but it used to be that the co-pilots, once they got enough seniority to fly the good routes, would take a pass on the promotion to 'full' pilot because that would mean going back to commuter runs and other puddle jumping crap.
 
2013-09-28 12:56:46 AM  

melopene: There IS always a passenger who's a pilot and land the plane... they call him the co-pilot. I don't know how much things have changed in the industry over the past decade or so, but it used to be that the co-pilots, once they got enough seniority to fly the good routes, would take a pass on the promotion to 'full' pilot because that would mean going back to commuter runs and other puddle jumping crap.


This kind of stuff is why you don't hear "co-pilot" much in the industry; implies that the other guy is the pilot. There are two 'full' pilots sitting up there, but one of them is in charge.
 
2013-09-28 01:00:29 AM  
It's an entirely different kind of flying, altogether.
 
2013-09-28 01:21:40 AM  

costermonger: melopene: There IS always a passenger who's a pilot and land the plane... they call him the co-pilot. I don't know how much things have changed in the industry over the past decade or so, but it used to be that the co-pilots, once they got enough seniority to fly the good routes, would take a pass on the promotion to 'full' pilot because that would mean going back to commuter runs and other puddle jumping crap.

This kind of stuff is why you don't hear "co-pilot" much in the industry; implies that the other guy is the pilot. There are two 'full' pilots sitting up there, but one of them is in charge.


Yeah, and it's not as if it's a cakewalk to get your commercial license and the associated ratings, either. My dad is a retired IA and CFI - I don't know that he ever actually taught anyone, but I do know that he went through the hoops to get as many ratings as he could. Sadly, he just stopped flying not long after getting the CFI and traded his share in the twin commanche in for a boat... I really do miss having access to a private plane. I never had to fly on commercial airlines until I was in college and if the cost weren't so prohibitive for me right now to get a plane (or a share in one), not to mention my utter fear of having to land a plane, I'd probably go and get my license as well - especially since I travel a decent amount for work nowadays.
 
2013-09-28 01:45:05 AM  
Striker?  Striker, Striker, Striker, STRIKER!
 
2013-09-28 02:19:12 AM  
But did the stewardess ever find anyone who could speak jive?
 
2013-09-28 02:20:21 AM  
What a pisser.
 
2013-09-28 02:21:13 AM  
Looks like I picked the wrong week to stop sniffing glue...
 
2013-09-28 02:21:17 AM  

bluorangefyre: Striker?  Striker, Striker, Striker, STRIKER!


[shrugs and punches out nearest secretary]
 
2013-09-28 02:25:45 AM  
Linked source in TFA mentions the pilot was 63 years old... I stopped paying attention a while ago, but I thought the FAA limited ATP's to 60 years, did that change, or is my memory just crappy?
 
2013-09-28 02:26:55 AM  

Paris1127: It's an entirely different kind of flying, altogether.


It's an entirely different kind of flying...
 
2013-09-28 02:27:48 AM  
Subby, do you have eggs coming out of your mouth?
 
2013-09-28 02:28:04 AM  

ekdikeo4: Good luck, we're all counting on you.


Thread over.
 
2013-09-28 02:29:04 AM  
When we used to fly those 777s we always made it over "the curb" at SFO.
 
2013-09-28 02:30:05 AM  
Um....why would a co-pilot need help landing the plane?  That's kinda disturbing.
 
2013-09-28 02:31:15 AM  

Tim Tebow: When we used to fly those 777s we always made it over "the curb" at SFO.


You stupid biatch. It's called flying and football to those who know the sport!
 
2013-09-28 02:34:00 AM  

bluorangefyre: Striker?  Striker, Striker, Striker, STRIKER!


WHAT?!?!

... Danger Zone!


I'm getting my cultural references mixed up again, aren't I?
 
2013-09-28 02:36:49 AM  
The flight came from Houston. I wonder if they were over the Taylor, TX airport.
 
2013-09-28 02:38:35 AM  

MisterTweak: Linked source in TFA mentions the pilot was 63 years old... I stopped paying attention a while ago, but I thought the FAA limited ATP's to 60 years, did that change, or is my memory just crappy?


It changed to 65 a little over 5 years ago.

Glenn Harmon, an aerospace physiologist who was an airline pilot for nine years before becoming a professor at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, said allcommercial airline pilots undergo a medical screening every six months to keep their certification with the FAA.

False. Its only all commercial pilots over 40 who go every 6 months. Under 40 is once/year. Glenn is a couple years behind the curve. Aviation Professors are the same as professors in most other industries. They know how it works on paper... (Most, but, not all of them).

/hit 40 before my next medical
//i'm officially old
 
2013-09-28 02:39:43 AM  
He should've had the lasagne.
 
2013-09-28 02:41:12 AM  

The Southern Dandy: Um....why would a co-pilot need help landing the plane?  That's kinda disturbing.


Not really. The 'substitute' pilot most likely worked the radios while the first officer (Co-pilot) actually flew the plane. Working the radios is really basic stuff.
 
2013-09-28 02:45:57 AM  

zulius: Paris1127: It's an entirely different kind of flying, altogether.

It's an entirely different kind of flying...


It's an entirely different kind of flying...
 
2013-09-28 02:46:14 AM  

dbirchall: My wife said it seems like there's always one passenger on the plane who's a pilot and can help fly.

I suggested that yeah, people in the industry fly for cheap or free, so it's not uncommon for them to be taking a flight to work or whatever.

She didn't accept that answer, and thinks it's deliberate, kind of like the Federal Air Marshals, and that they actually plan it so every flight has a pilot aboard as a passenger.  Yay, I married a conspiracy theorist. :)


Your wife is nuts. Between jump-seaters going back & forth to their hubs, dead-heading back home after work, taking cheap flights on vacation, and otherwise doing all the traveling that pilots get to do that us hoipolloi don't, it would be stranger to find a flight that DIDN'T have a few spare pilots onboard than one that did.

My sister the former pilot often said the hardest thing about no longer being a pilot was having to wean herself off all the cheap air travel she used to get.
 
2013-09-28 02:48:49 AM  
Um, the linked article and video both make no mention of what the subby describes in the headline.  Why?
 
2013-09-28 02:49:22 AM  
Did we read the same article subby?  There was no mention of a passenger who helped land the plane. They asked is anyone was a physician, which if you didn't know is a doctor, not a person who trains 737 pilots, if that's your mistake. But other then that they barely mentioned the passengers other then in statics.

/I even watched the video, still nothing about a passenger flying
//Also a copilot is fully capable of landing by themselves unless the weather conditions are fierce
///not to mention most modern aircraft are computerized to the point where they can land themselves.
 
2013-09-28 02:52:40 AM  
Not suprised, my pilot brother uses staff travel as a passenger all the time, even for day trips to visit friends in other cities. There's definitely not going to be a "spare" pilot on every flight, not by a long shot, but there's decent odds.

That said, it's a lucky fact that no non-pilot in the history of air travel has ever needed to take over and land the plane because both pilots had passed out or whatever. So good odds that it'll never happen to you.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=giixQm2A9Xw
 
2013-09-28 02:52:54 AM  

positronica: Um, the linked article and video both make no mention of what the subby describes in the headline.  Why?


Because apparently subby knows that whoever greenlights articles around here these days doesn't bother reading them either.
 
2013-09-28 02:53:21 AM  
I read the article three times and watched the video twice and saw nothing about a passenger helping the co-pilot land the plane. Could this be a rare case of inaccurate headline?
 
2013-09-28 02:58:45 AM  
i.imgur.com
 
2013-09-28 02:59:26 AM  
The headline is inaccurate, but it does sound familiar.
 
2013-09-28 03:05:52 AM  

Funbags: [i.imgur.com image 470x300]


Damn!  Beat me to it.
 
2013-09-28 03:13:45 AM  
Erm , why didn't the passenger who trains 737 pilots for a living just fly the farking plane? Instead, he 'helps' the co-pilot?

What? Is he Jewish and it was a Sunday or some shiat? He could verbally assist but couldn't touch the controls? He had no arms or legs?

Headline makes no sense.
 
2013-09-28 03:13:51 AM  
The article linked in the story mentions a passenger who was on board helping the copilot. http://www.komonews.com/news/local/Seattle-bound-flight-lands-in-Bois e -after-pilot-suffers-heart-attack-225453132.html
 
2013-09-28 03:16:04 AM  

The Southern Dandy: Um....why would a co-pilot need help landing the plane?  That's kinda disturbing.


I don't know. sitting next to a dying guy might be a bit distracting.
 
2013-09-28 03:19:26 AM  
Hero tag for what exactly?
 
2013-09-28 03:23:23 AM  

penywisexx: The article linked in the story mentions a passenger who was on board helping the copilot. http://www.komonews.com/news/local/Seattle-bound-flight-lands-in-Bois e -after-pilot-suffers-heart-attack-225453132.html


"The two doctors and an off-duty United Airlines pilot were among the 161 people aboard the flight. The off-duty pilot aided the first officer - who is also a trained pilot - in landing the plane while the physicians performed CPR. '

Still no mention of anyone training pilots. There's a trained pilot, which isn't the same a a pilot trainer.
 
2013-09-28 03:34:06 AM  
I'm guessing that subby read the detail about the pilot trainer in some other article and attempted to submit that. When it was refused as a previously submitted (and not listed) article, he just went and Googled the flight number and submitted the first article that turned up instead without even reading it.

As for the admin who approved it, I dunno... Blame it on the bourbon, maybe?
 
2013-09-28 03:35:37 AM  

tjsands1118: penywisexx: The article linked in the story mentions a passenger who was on board helping the copilot. http://www.komonews.com/news/local/Seattle-bound-flight-lands-in-Bois e -after-pilot-suffers-heart-attack-225453132.html

"The two doctors and an off-duty United Airlines pilot were among the 161 people aboard the flight. The off-duty pilot aided the first officer - who is also a trained pilot - in landing the plane while the physicians performed CPR. '

Still no mention of anyone training pilots. There's a trained pilot, which isn't the same a a pilot trainer.


I ran across this story earlier (don't remember where, sorry, no links) and the article I read did mention that the passenger was someone who trained 737 pilots.
 
2013-09-28 03:41:43 AM  
They had to get him to a Hospital...
 
2013-09-28 03:54:23 AM  
Doesn't look like they used the AED which should have been available. CPR is great, but getting your heart zapped will increase your survival by a whole bunch more.
 
2013-09-28 04:41:39 AM  

HisBoyLeroy: Doesn't look like they used the AED which should have been available. CPR is great, but getting your heart zapped will increase your survival by a whole bunch more.


 Contrary to what you might learn by watching ER and House while staying at a Holiday Inn Express, you can't just willy-nilly try to jumpstart a patient if they don't have a pulse.  That's why the AED only fires if it detects a rhythm it can countershock against (ventricular tachycardia or ventricular fibrillation).  Otherwise it'll just tell you to continue CPR.
 
2013-09-28 04:46:13 AM  

iron_city_ap: The Southern Dandy: Um....why would a co-pilot need help landing the plane?  That's kinda disturbing.

Not really. The 'substitute' pilot most likely worked the radios while the first officer (Co-pilot) actually flew the plane. Working the radios is really basic stuff.


Worked the radio, read the checklists, kept an eye out for traffic, all that good stuff.  One guy could land the plane by himself, but he'd be busier than a three-peckered goat and would be more prone to making a simple mistake.
 
2013-09-28 04:47:56 AM  
images.amcnetworks.com
 
2013-09-28 04:50:07 AM  
Haven't read the thread yet, but has anyone quoted that "Airplane" movie? That would be funny!
 
2013-09-28 04:54:07 AM  

The Southern Dandy: Um....why would a co-pilot need help landing the plane?  That's kinda disturbing.


Have you ever seen a grown man naked?
 
2013-09-28 05:32:37 AM  
The co-pilot was perfectly capable of landing  the plane. That's kinda the point. However, 2 heads are better than one, so glad the trainer could help.
 
2013-09-28 05:32:42 AM  
Would have been a better story if there had been a medical technician on the manifest who could of, I don't know ... saved the pilot.
 
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