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(SeattlePI)   UW lab worker rushed to hospital after "bottom fell out" of container holding over two liters of hydrochloric acid solution. Nobody said science would be easy   (blog.seattlepi.com) divider line 213
    More: Scary, hydrochloric acid, University of Washington, Seattle Fire Department, UW lab, decontamination, oil spills, corrosive, containers  
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9640 clicks; posted to Main » on 27 Sep 2013 at 9:16 PM (42 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-09-28 03:54:57 PM

White_Scarf_Syndrome: itsaidwhat: Mister Peejay: cuzsis: Okay guys, freak me out here.

 It's been a looong time since I took chem. I called it quits in the lab as a job when I realized I was too lazy to keep up proper safety in the lab on a day-in-day-out basis (forgetting gloves, goggles, periodically, that sort of thing.) Other than getting a few snoot fulls of HCl, never ran into any truly awful stuff that I recall.

 What does HF do to you?

Makes flesh necrotic, leaches the calcium from your bones and replaces it with fluorine (good luck ever getting THAT out, if you live long enough for it to be a problem), and the best part is that it kills your nerve endings so you don't even feel the burn until it's far too late to do anything about it.

IIRC, three square inches of skin contact is fatal.

The only response to stop the spread further into the tissue is to inject paraffin under the exposure.

Nice.  I thought it was cooking grease?


You kids think bacon is the solution to everything.

I've never seen it done. My guess is that it's medicinal liquid paraffin.

From wiki. "Medicinal liquid paraffin is a very highly refined mineral oil used in cosmetics and for medical purposes. This is a UK definition (British Pharmacopoeia) and the term may have different uses in other countries. The cosmetic or medicinal liquid paraffin should not be confused with the paraffin (or kerosene) used as a fuel."
 
2013-09-28 04:15:20 PM

Peki: Kensey: Peki: I hate the Big Bang Theory, and everyone I know who is actually a geek does.

I've heard BBT and The IT Crowd described as "[nerd|geek] blackface".

That's actually really apt, because if you are a geek, you do walk away slightly insulted.


Yes, unfortunately. I'm going to adopt that term to describe both shows, I think - it's rather accurate.
 
2013-09-28 05:04:44 PM

jso2897: And then, there is the most horrible poisoning of them all - gold thioglucose or gold thioglutimate.


How so?  All I can find is some references to appetite upregulation.
 
2013-09-28 05:10:43 PM
At least it wasn't H2FSbF6.
 
2013-09-28 05:29:10 PM

ransack.: NOBODY mentioned fluoroantimonic acid? It's 10 quadrillion times stronger than 100% sulfuric acid! Show some respect!


Jesus lizards!  I thought you were exaggerating.
 
2013-09-28 05:40:03 PM
When I was a senior in high school, we had an open house for eighth grade students. Part was the chem lab, showing off basic reactions- carbide in bleach, plating metals, things like that.

I forget what reaction I was running, but the fume hood died. Quick whiff of chlorine, got everyone out of there, but not before getting a hell of a lungful of chlorine gas.

Hurt like a biatch. I was outside hacking up a lung for about an hour in the snow, and couldn't take a deep breath for about a month.
 
2013-09-28 05:58:20 PM
Careful if working with Picric acid. If the moisture content drops it will explode like an IED.
Watched a film of it exploding in a lab. Pretty impressive.
 
2013-09-28 06:12:16 PM

itsaidwhat: White_Scarf_Syndrome: itsaidwhat: Mister Peejay: cuzsis: Okay guys, freak me out here.

 It's been a looong time since I took chem. I called it quits in the lab as a job when I realized I was too lazy to keep up proper safety in the lab on a day-in-day-out basis (forgetting gloves, goggles, periodically, that sort of thing.) Other than getting a few snoot fulls of HCl, never ran into any truly awful stuff that I recall.

 What does HF do to you?

Makes flesh necrotic, leaches the calcium from your bones and replaces it with fluorine (good luck ever getting THAT out, if you live long enough for it to be a problem), and the best part is that it kills your nerve endings so you don't even feel the burn until it's far too late to do anything about it.

IIRC, three square inches of skin contact is fatal.

The only response to stop the spread further into the tissue is to inject paraffin under the exposure.

Nice.  I thought it was cooking grease?

You kids think bacon is the solution to everything.

I've never seen it done. My guess is that it's medicinal liquid paraffin.

From wiki. "Medicinal liquid paraffin is a very highly refined mineral oil used in cosmetics and for medical purposes. This is a UK definition (British Pharmacopoeia) and the term may have different uses in other countries. The cosmetic or medicinal liquid paraffin should not be confused with the paraffin (or kerosene) used as a fuel."


From the MSDS:

Skin Contact:
In case of contact, immediately flush skin with plenty of water for at least 15 minutes while removing contaminated clothing
and shoes. Cover the irritated skin with an emollient. Cold water may be used. Wash clothing before reuse. Thoroughly clean
shoes before reuse. Get medical attention immediately. While waiting for medical attention, it has been shown that flushing
the affected area with water for one minute and then massaging HF Antidote Gel into the wound until there is a cessation of
pain is a most effective first aid treatment. HF Antidote Gel contains Calcium Gluconate which combines with HF for insoluble
Calcium Fluoride, thus preventing the extraction of calcium from the body tissue and bones. Another alternative first aid
treatment, after thorough washing of the burned area, is to immerse the burned area in a solution of 0.2% iced aqueous
Hyamine 1622 or 0.13% iced aqueous Zephiran Chloride. If immersion is inpractical, towels should be soaked with one of
the above solutions and used as compresses for the burn area. Hyamine 1622 is a trade name for Tetracaine Benzethonium
Chloride. Zephiran is a trade name for Benzalkonium Chloride. Again, seek medical attention as soon as possible for all burns
regardless of how minor they may appear initially.

For eye contact you're basically farked.

Eye Contact:
Check for and remove any contact lenses. In case of contact, immediately flush eyes with plenty of water for at least 15-30
minutes. Cold water may be used. Keep the eyelids apart and away from the eyeballs during irrigation. Do not use oily drops
or ointment or HF skin burn treatments on the eyes. Get medical attention immediately, preferrably an eye specialist. If a
physician is not immediately available, apply one or two drops of ophthalmic anesthetic (e.g. 0.5% Pontocaine Hydrochloride
solution). Place ice pack on eyes until reaching emergency room.

One of my favorite things to do is to read the MSDS for various substances and pretend it's a detailed sheet on my ex girlfriends.  You should try it.
 
2013-09-28 07:06:40 PM

doosh: fusillade762: Felgraf: Nothing like a small faceful of HCl fumes to clean your sinuses.

I can remember combining some stuff in chemistry class once and the teacher told us to waft the fumes toward our faces to get a whiff. Of course I stupidly put the test tube right under my nose and sniffed. It was like someone had jammed a wire brush up my nose.

Was it ammonia?


Could have been. Honestly it was 30 years ago, so I don't remember for sure.
 
2013-09-28 07:09:08 PM
And those Woodstock wimps complain about bad acid.
 
2013-09-28 08:56:05 PM

MythDragon: cuzsis: Glockenspiel Hero: Every chemist has a great store of tales like this.  I managed to open a stuck jar of KOH pellets once and ended up flinging them all over the place.  I got most of them but missed two- one ate a hole in my pocket, the other I found about ten minutes later when I noticed my hair felt funny.  Dissolved it all very nicely down to a bald spot.

I also managed to turn my arm orange when I splashed fuming nitric all over it while nitrating cotton balls,  (Damn ice bath cubes locked up when I was trying to move the flask)

Still, nowhere near as bad as walking past an organic lab and smelling new mown hay.   Umm, guys, you might want to evacuate pronto...

Well...don't leave us hanging! What was it?

/never took organic chem

Nerve agent.

One of the things they teach you to look for in the Army. Of course if you're smelling it, you've been exposed. Hopefully you've got your mask to limit any further breathing of it, and you've got some atropine and 2-Pam Chloride to inject.

At least those you can counteract nerve agents. You get hit with blood or blister agents, there is not as much can be done for you.


Aaaannd the atropine was to keep the 2-PAM chloride from killing you. Nasty farking stuff. I had a healthy respect for the chemical part of NBC training, and it always creeped me out a little when we got to that part of the training rotation. Also, this was right after the USSR had broken up and nobody was really sure what had happened to all that stuff the Soviets had salted away over the years. A lot of the old Cold-War era NCOs that I dealt with were convinced that our next theater action, somebody was gonna get dosed.
 
2013-09-28 10:16:56 PM

cryinoutloud: JohnAnnArbor: That'll clear the ol' sinuses.

Oh thank goodness. I am desperate to get rid of this sinus infection.

[2.bp.blogspot.com image 500x330]


Watch out for Naegleria fowleri there.  Enters through the nose, eats your brain.

upload.wikimedia.org
 
2013-09-28 10:18:54 PM

Sword and Shield: When I was a senior in high school, we had an open house for eighth grade students. Part was the chem lab, showing off basic reactions- carbide in bleach, plating metals, things like that.

I forget what reaction I was running, but the fume hood died. Quick whiff of chlorine, got everyone out of there, but not before getting a hell of a lungful of chlorine gas.

Hurt like a biatch. I was outside hacking up a lung for about an hour in the snow, and couldn't take a deep breath for about a month.


Some dumbass put bleach in his gas tank thinking it would clean up his truck's emissions somehow.

When it was at our shop for the emissions diagnosis, I was walking by and decided to try to locate the (loud) exhaust leak.  Stuck my head under the running truck to have a look and the next thing I remember, I'm outside trying to breathe.
 
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