If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(SeattlePI)   UW lab worker rushed to hospital after "bottom fell out" of container holding over two liters of hydrochloric acid solution. Nobody said science would be easy   (blog.seattlepi.com) divider line 213
    More: Scary, hydrochloric acid, University of Washington, Seattle Fire Department, UW lab, decontamination, oil spills, corrosive, containers  
•       •       •

9646 clicks; posted to Main » on 27 Sep 2013 at 9:16 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



213 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | » | Last | Show all
 
2013-09-27 11:00:52 PM  
Long time lab tech....worked with lots of strong acids....perchloric and HF demanded the most respect.....only one burn ever....pinhole leak in glove+glacial acetic acid=serious fu*king nasty pain!....lost outer layer of skin off most of my index finger....think tender pink stuff after you pop a blister.....

/don't really miss the lab....
//except making potassium triiodide
 
2013-09-27 11:04:26 PM  

Rwa2play: Felgraf: Also, at least it wasn't Piranha Solution. Mother of god that stuff scares me. I really, REALLY do not like working with it *at all*.

Looks at what Piranha Solution is....

Ummm yeah, I don't wanna be within 1000 feet of that stuff either.


No kidding.  I know nothing about organic chemistry, so Ive been reading names, and spending time at Wikipedia.  Holy crap, most of this stuff is nasty!  I swear I read one that said "...is so dangerous it will sneak out of the lab, take the #12 bus, and kill you and your family at home."  Glad I'm in software.
 
2013-09-27 11:12:56 PM  

Rwa2play: jshine: jshine: Hollie Maea: My workplace has all sorts of stuff trying to kill me. The HCl and KOH are pretty tame but I don't trust the Nitric or the HF or that bastard Silane.

Google nickel tetracarbonyl.

Or dimethylmercury.

Wow, just a few drops kills.  Ummmm, wow.


Tell me again why folks bother with sarin gas?
 
2013-09-27 11:13:00 PM  

Felgraf: White_Scarf_Syndrome: OK OK!

I haven't read the thread but...how many semicon fab workers do we have here?  How many have seen the emergency showers being used? I'd like my home shower to put out that volume of water in 30 seconds.  I wouldn't be late for work so much.

OK I will read the thread.

Chem-nerds! GOOOOO!!!!

Amusingly, I am actually a physicist.

But I'm doing my grad degree in nanophysics, so about half of what I do is chemistry (or, as I call it, magic.)
/Alternatively, I call it "you farking bastards, you left crucial steps out of your paper! WHYU DO THAT"


Probably because if only you were a chemist, it would have been really f***in' obvious that you needed to do (whatever it was).
 
2013-09-27 11:13:56 PM  

Glockenspiel Hero: Every chemist has a great store of tales like this.  I managed to open a stuck jar of KOH pellets once and ended up flinging them all over the place.  I got most of them but missed two- one ate a hole in my pocket, the other I found about ten minutes later when I noticed my hair felt funny.  Dissolved it all very nicely down to a bald spot.

I also managed to turn my arm orange when I splashed fuming nitric all over it while nitrating cotton balls,  (Damn ice bath cubes locked up when I was trying to move the flask)

Still, nowhere near as bad as walking past an organic lab and smelling new mown hay.   Umm, guys, you might want to evacuate pronto...


Well...don't leave us hanging! What was it?

/never took organic chem
 
2013-09-27 11:14:19 PM  
So you're saying I shouldn't have ordered a bunch of 2 liter bottles of concentrated acids?

I've been reading "Ignition!' in fits and spurts. It's basically rocket fuel chemistry for dummies. I have a new-found respect for all the acids sitting in my corrosives cabinet.
 
2013-09-27 11:14:44 PM  

Peki: And this thread has totally inspired me to go back to school to learn some chemistry. I want to learn to read a molecule diagram and go "oh crap" or giggle because everyone is freaking out over water.


Good for you, but just a warning: the biatch of chemistry is that (unlike biology or physics) it takes a long time to get to the really good stuff.  You might look for the condensed/combo classes they often teach for nurses or bio majors, otherwise it's two FULL years before you can even start thinking about things like biochemistry.  I'm sure there are MOOCs that do the condensed thing, too.  Not a good enough foundation if you're going to be a physical scientist or go to med school, but more than fine for brain expansion.

Anyway, that's my 2c FWIW.

Lt. Cheese Weasel: HCL is nasty.  HFL is worse.


Chemistry FAIL:  HCl, HF. Capitalization matters.
 
2013-09-27 11:15:30 PM  

KumquatMay: I have been waiting for "ze goggles, zey do nozzing, but I am disappoint...


Pssst. Check the 4th post.
 
2013-09-27 11:16:24 PM  
Okay guys, freak me out here.

 It's been a looong time since I took chem. I called it quits in the lab as a job when I realized I was too lazy to keep up proper safety in the lab on a day-in-day-out basis (forgetting gloves, goggles, periodically, that sort of thing.) Other than getting a few snoot fulls of HCl, never ran into any truly awful stuff that I recall.

 What does HF do to you?
 
2013-09-27 11:20:23 PM  

Bacontastesgood: Peki: And this thread has totally inspired me to go back to school to learn some chemistry. I want to learn to read a molecule diagram and go "oh crap" or giggle because everyone is freaking out over water.

Good for you, but just a warning: the biatch of chemistry is that (unlike biology or physics) it takes a long time to get to the really good stuff.  You might look for the condensed/combo classes they often teach for nurses or bio majors, otherwise it's two FULL years before you can even start thinking about things like biochemistry.  I'm sure there are MOOCs that do the condensed thing, too.  Not a good enough foundation if you're going to be a physical scientist or go to med school, but more than fine for brain expansion.

Anyway, that's my 2c FWIW.

Lt. Cheese Weasel: HCL is nasty.  HFL is worse.

Chemistry FAIL:  HCl, HF. Capitalization matters.


You knew what I meant, acidgrammarnazi.
 
2013-09-27 11:20:40 PM  

fusillade762: [tvmedia.ign.com image 468x270]

/oblig


Done in one.  In fine fashion.
 
2013-09-27 11:20:54 PM  

blue_2501: Rwa2play: jshine: jshine: Hollie Maea: My workplace has all sorts of stuff trying to kill me. The HCl and KOH are pretty tame but I don't trust the Nitric or the HF or that bastard Silane.

Google nickel tetracarbonyl.

Or dimethylmercury.

Wow, just a few drops kills.  Ummmm, wow.

Tell me again why folks bother with sarin gas?



Sarin is still more toxic, but importantly, it is not persistent.  If you sprayed dimethylmercury on your enemy, the land would remain toxic for a long time.  It would be like the Romans salting the fields of their enemies.  Sarin kills and is then gone very quickly, so you don't kill your own troops too.  Also, sarin (an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor) poisoning is somewhat easier to treat than heavy metal poisoning if you do have an "oops" moment...
 
2013-09-27 11:21:00 PM  

Mr_Moto: Probably because if only you were a chemist, it would have been really f***in' obvious that you needed to do (whatever it was).


It's actually revenge for physicists leaving major steps in derivations out of their papers, and sometimes not fixing mistakes in the symbols or whatever.

Reminds me of a supposedly true story - the people who came up with a high temperature superconductor (YBCO, where the Y=yttrium) put it in the paper being peer reviewed as Yb = Ytterbium.  A deliberate "mistake" to prevent some other lab copying. The world market price for Ytterbium suddenly shot up.  The authors must have been laughing their asses off thinking of all the people trying to synthesize a material with the wrong element.

I'll have to go look that up and see if it's true.
 
2013-09-27 11:23:17 PM  

jshine: blue_2501: Rwa2play: jshine: jshine: Hollie Maea: My workplace has all sorts of stuff trying to kill me. The HCl and KOH are pretty tame but I don't trust the Nitric or the HF or that bastard Silane.

Google nickel tetracarbonyl.

Or dimethylmercury.

Wow, just a few drops kills.  Ummmm, wow.

Tell me again why folks bother with sarin gas?


Sarin is still more toxic, but importantly, it is not persistent.  If you sprayed dimethylmercury on your enemy, the land would remain toxic for a long time.  It would be like the Romans salting the fields of their enemies.  Sarin kills and is then gone very quickly, so you don't kill your own troops too.  Also, sarin (an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor) poisoning is somewhat easier to treat than heavy metal poisoning if you do have an "oops" moment...



Also, sarin kills quickly, which probably is pretty important for a weapon.  At low doses, dimethylmercury could take months.
 
2013-09-27 11:24:07 PM  

Hack Patooey: Rwa2play: Felgraf: Also, at least it wasn't Piranha Solution. Mother of god that stuff scares me. I really, REALLY do not like working with it *at all*.

Looks at what Piranha Solution is....

Ummm yeah, I don't wanna be within 1000 feet of that stuff either.

No kidding.  I know nothing about organic chemistry, so Ive been reading names, and spending time at Wikipedia.  Holy crap, most of this stuff is nasty!  I swear I read one that said "...is so dangerous it will sneak out of the lab, take the #12 bus, and kill you and your family at home."  Glad I'm in software.


Dimethylmercury is the most frightening; a substance so toxic its use has been discontinued because getting a few drops on you will kill you if you're not treated in time.
 
2013-09-27 11:25:36 PM  

New Age Redneck: Long time lab tech....worked with lots of strong acids....perchloric and HF demanded the most respect.....only one burn ever....pinhole leak in glove+glacial acetic acid=serious fu*king nasty pain!....lost outer layer of skin off most of my index finger....think tender pink stuff after you pop a blister.....

/don't really miss the lab....
//except making potassium triiodide


In grad school I had to highly polish titanium to reveal the microstructure which requires ~2% HF (conc.), ~2% nitric acid (conc.) with the balance water. I was concerned enough that I bought the antidote cream in case of getting HF on the skin. I also electropolished the titanium for microscope work which required a solution containing perchloric acid. I got scared because it can be explosive and you are not supposed to let it get in contact with organics, like normal paper towels, or it could combust. I tried to start a mini fire with paper towels, just to see how sensitive it was, but I failed. The funny thing I was using a chemical hood where the number one warning was "do not use perchloric acid with this hood." Good times. I never injured myself though.
 
2013-09-27 11:26:58 PM  

Bacontastesgood: Mr_Moto: Probably because if only you were a chemist, it would have been really f***in' obvious that you needed to do (whatever it was).

It's actually revenge for physicists leaving major steps in derivations out of their papers, and sometimes not fixing mistakes in the symbols or whatever.

Reminds me of a supposedly true story - the people who came up with a high temperature superconductor (YBCO, where the Y=yttrium) put it in the paper being peer reviewed as Yb = Ytterbium.  A deliberate "mistake" to prevent some other lab copying. The world market price for Ytterbium suddenly shot up.  The authors must have been laughing their asses off thinking of all the people trying to synthesize a material with the wrong element.

I'll have to go look that up and see if it's true.


Yeah, there are a lot of chemistry papers with "mistakes" in them too.  Or, even more common, they "forgot" to include something.

I do physical chemistry, so I get the worst of both worlds
 
2013-09-27 11:28:14 PM  
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GnTYUBTe-3o

MASSIVE HF release in Korea.

Hey Ree!

Yeah!?

It's almost lunchtime, screw the PPE.  Righty tighty and all that.  It's just HF.  Whatever.

OK Ree!

Yes these two died.  No it's not graphic, just an example of sheer idiocy.
 
2013-09-27 11:28:29 PM  

Hack Patooey: Rwa2play: Felgraf: Also, at least it wasn't Piranha Solution. Mother of god that stuff scares me. I really, REALLY do not like working with it *at all*.

Looks at what Piranha Solution is....

Ummm yeah, I don't wanna be within 1000 feet of that stuff either.

No kidding.  I know nothing about organic chemistry, so Ive been reading names, and spending time at Wikipedia.  Holy crap, most of this stuff is nasty!  I swear I read one that said "...is so dangerous it will sneak out of the lab, take the #12 bus, and kill you and your family at home."  Glad I'm in software.


Derek Lowe's "Things I Won't Work With" is my go-to jumping-off place for stuff like this. We've got chlorine triflouride, "during World War II, the Germans were very interested in using it in self-igniting flamethrowers, but found it too nasty to work with." The classic dioxygen difluoride, "often referred to in the literature by its evocative formula of FOOF." If 8 nitrogens in a row was too stable, here's ten nitrogens in a row, and if ten's not enough, we can go back to Derek's blog for N-amino azidotetrazole, "two carbons, fourteen nitrogens, and no hydrogens at all, a formula that even Klapötke himself, who clearly has refined sensibilities when it comes to hellishly unstable chemicals, calls "exciting". Trust me, you don't want to be around when someone who works with azidotetrazoles comes across something "exciting"..."
 
2013-09-27 11:29:26 PM  

cuzsis: Okay guys, freak me out here.

 It's been a looong time since I took chem. I called it quits in the lab as a job when I realized I was too lazy to keep up proper safety in the lab on a day-in-day-out basis (forgetting gloves, goggles, periodically, that sort of thing.) Other than getting a few snoot fulls of HCl, never ran into any truly awful stuff that I recall.

 What does HF do to you?


Makes flesh necrotic, leaches the calcium from your bones and replaces it with fluorine (good luck ever getting THAT out, if you live long enough for it to be a problem), and the best part is that it kills your nerve endings so you don't even feel the burn until it's far too late to do anything about it.

IIRC, three square inches of skin contact is fatal.
 
2013-09-27 11:30:02 PM  

cuzsis: What does HF do to you?


It's a weak acid in chemical terms, so it doesn't do the normal 'acid' thing. However it does diffuse through your skin quite easily, and once it's inside your body the fluoride ion binds very strongly to any calcium ions it can find. Since your body uses those calcium ions for other purposes such as staying alive or holding your bones together, this leads to adverse consequences (sometimes hours after the exposure).
 
2013-09-27 11:31:39 PM  
http://www.csb.gov/

Great site for explanations and computer reenacmtents of pretty bad incidents.
 
2013-09-27 11:33:38 PM  

White_Scarf_Syndrome: http://www.csb.gov/

Great site for explanations and computer reenacmtents of pretty bad incidents.


I parse that URL as "Cool Story, Bro dot gov"
 
2013-09-27 11:34:53 PM  

Ivo Shandor: cuzsis: What does HF do to you?

It's a weak acid in chemical terms, so it doesn't do the normal 'acid' thing. However it does diffuse through your skin quite easily, and once it's inside your body the fluoride ion binds very strongly to any calcium ions it can find. Since your body uses those calcium ions for other purposes such as staying alive or holding your bones together, this leads to adverse consequences (sometimes hours after the exposure).


Agonizing pain due to calcium fluoride crystals forming in your blood, nasty disfiguration of the tissue where the exposure occurred, or good old-fashioned cardiac arrest (due to a depletion of calcium).  Good times...
 
2013-09-27 11:35:11 PM  
And for the curious, here is the MSDS for Honeywells batch of HF.  I believe they are the worlds largest supplier.  A nice looking PDF in my opinion.  A lot of MSDS sheets are still look like they were typed on a typerwriter.

Pay attention to the delayed effects portion.

http://www51.honeywell.com/sm/hfacid/common/documents/AHF_MSDS.pdf

Or you could just GIS HF exposures, but I am done with that for a while after all the Krokodil threads.

Enjoy, and goodnight.
 
2013-09-27 11:35:15 PM  

cuzsis: Okay guys, freak me out here.

 It's been a looong time since I took chem. I called it quits in the lab as a job when I realized I was too lazy to keep up proper safety in the lab on a day-in-day-out basis (forgetting gloves, goggles, periodically, that sort of thing.) Other than getting a few snoot fulls of HCl, never ran into any truly awful stuff that I recall.

 What does HF do to you?


I got out of the Chem business years (or likely, decades) before you left your lab job, so I'm going from a very hazy memory, but I seem to recall that in a lab, it was more dangerous as a calcium-reactive poison than for the properties you'd typically expect from a strong acid. I changed majors 2 years into ChemE because I found it to be obnoxiously boring and tedious, and probably because I didn't pay as much attention as I should have.
 
2013-09-27 11:36:55 PM  

cuzsis: What does HF do to you?


Penetrates your skin easily, which you don't feel so much, and attacks your bones, which you do.  If your bones start to dissolve, the treatment is injection of calcium gluconate deep under the skin, next to the bone.  It is said to be intensely painful.

There are bio agents that are much worse tho.  One woman I dated was working with a digest enzyme that would dissolve flesh like gasoline dissolves styrofoam.  Getting that on your skin would be worse than any acid.
 
2013-09-27 11:37:07 PM  

Mr_Moto: Probably because if only you were a chemist, it would have been really f***in' obvious that you needed to do (whatever it was).


Probably. I know at least one reaction a collaborator was doing wasn't working. They contacted the researcher.
"Oh! The entire reaction has to be done under nitrogen." "... At no point does your paper even suggest this." "Well, yeah, it's implied in the field we published in!" (And that collaborator *was* a chemist...)


Ivo Shandor: cuzsis: What does HF do to you?

It's a weak acid in chemical terms, so it doesn't do the normal 'acid' thing. However it does diffuse through your skin quite easily, and once it's inside your body the fluoride ion binds very strongly to any calcium ions it can find. Since your body uses those calcium ions for other purposes such as staying alive or holding your bones together, this leads to adverse consequences (sometimes hours after the exposure).


Don't forget the bonus fun points of odorless and colorless, so it *looks* like it's just water!
 
2013-09-27 11:37:10 PM  
Another reason why HF sucks so bad, is because they will not give you pain meds.  Medics need to be able to have you tell them where it hurts so they can do their job accordingly.  This stuff ain't no Robocop acid.
 
2013-09-27 11:37:10 PM  
Or, apparently, other people who know more about it can answer that ahead of me and make me look like I only took 2 years of Chem E.
 
2013-09-27 11:38:05 PM  

White_Scarf_Syndrome: http://www.csb.gov/

Great site for explanations and computer reenacmtents of pretty bad incidents.


CSB!
 
2013-09-27 11:41:11 PM  

Bacontastesgood: Mr_Moto: Probably because if only you were a chemist, it would have been really f***in' obvious that you needed to do (whatever it was).

It's actually revenge for physicists leaving major steps in derivations out of their papers, and sometimes not fixing mistakes in the symbols or whatever.

Reminds me of a supposedly true story - the people who came up with a high temperature superconductor (YBCO, where the Y=yttrium) put it in the paper being peer reviewed as Yb = Ytterbium.  A deliberate "mistake" to prevent some other lab copying. The world market price for Ytterbium suddenly shot up.  The authors must have been laughing their asses off thinking of all the people trying to synthesize a material with the wrong element.

I'll have to go look that up and see if it's true.


Could be true, though the physicist in me is skeptical, if only because that's a good way to get your paper shot down by follow ups.  However, that may just be my personal experience/anecdotes speaking-Our group actually got a negative result published-apparently we did a *very* thorough job of going "uuuuuuhhhh no." to another group's work. It may have helped that a third group *also* got negative results.

To be fair, given that this is nanophysics, the first group may very well have gotten interesting results, but left out some minor thing that was, nevertheless, important to the reaction (I swear to god, it sometimes feels like the phase of the goddamn MOON changes these things. I *know* the humidity can drastically alter some of the synthesis...)
 
2013-09-27 11:42:00 PM  

Mr_Moto: I do physical chemistry, so I get the worst of both worlds


Yeah, I did Pchem and then moved to materials, now doing some bio related work.  My career goal is to keep learning new things so I suck equally at all of them.
 
2013-09-27 11:42:42 PM  
man! i hate the seahawks! i'm a rams fan.

/sorry, what were we talking about?
 
2013-09-27 11:44:42 PM  

Bacontastesgood: cuzsis: What does HF do to you?

Penetrates your skin easily, which you don't feel so much, and attacks your bones, which you do.  If your bones start to dissolve, the treatment is injection of calcium gluconate deep under the skin, next to the bone.  It is said to be intensely painful.

There are bio agents that are much worse tho.  One woman I dated was working with a digest enzyme that would dissolve flesh like gasoline dissolves styrofoam.  Getting that on your skin would be worse than any acid.


no matter what, do whatever she wants!
 
2013-09-27 11:46:24 PM  
yes, HF exposure is not dramatic, but rarely turns out well.  You adsorb it too quickly for showers and that other crap to help much.  You just sort of fall apart and die.  Parts of the process hurt.  Your don't "burn" like other acids. It messes up nerve signals so you don't get the sizzle and Oh God shiat phase.  You get all the other parts though.

I don't know if there is a treatment.  amputation?
 
2013-09-27 11:46:40 PM  

Peki: thisisyourbrainonFark: doglover: HF isn't natural

Isn't everything, when you get down to at the molecular level, organic?

/serious question

Most things labelled organic have carbon in them.

And this thread has totally inspired me to go back to school to learn some chemistry. I want to learn to read a molecule diagram and go "oh crap" or giggle because everyone is freaking out over water.


Little Johnny was a chemist

Little Johnny is no more

For what he thought was H2O

Was H2SO4

Also...

thebigbangtheoryfansite.com
 
2013-09-27 11:46:42 PM  

Dimensio: [www.comicbookmovie.com image 245x316]

The worker suffered some facial scarring, but is expected to make a full recovery.


"That wasn't easy to get over, and don't think that I didn't try."
 
2013-09-27 11:47:37 PM  
I'm not sure if HF is odorless.  I found it odd that we don't have to wear breathing air for drum changeouts.  Maybe the company we purchase from adds something to make it smell, but I swear the stuff has a smell.  I dunno.  Lots of companies make these chemicals.
 
2013-09-27 11:48:26 PM  

Felgraf: Could be true, though the physicist in me is skeptical, if only because that's a good way to get your paper shot down by follow ups.


Well, i can't find confirmation, so it could be bull, but the part of the story I forgot above is that they changed Yb to Y in the page proofs.  So the publication is correct as printed.  No one was supposed to do lab work to review the paper, just accept that what they were saying was true.   I know someone at U of H who knows Prof Chu, they could ask, but not sure if he's around or would admit to such a thing.  No clue who the reviewers were either.  This was a grapevine thing I heard a couple of years after.

When I did some big industry work they made us be all "The alloy was AxByCz" when presenting things.  I hated it.  Just tell me I can't present if your precious secret can't be told.
 
2013-09-27 11:52:24 PM  

Felgraf: Mr_Moto: Probably because if only you were a chemist, it would have been really f***in' obvious that you needed to do (whatever it was).

Probably. I know at least one reaction a collaborator was doing wasn't working. They contacted the researcher.
"Oh! The entire reaction has to be done under nitrogen." "... At no point does your paper even suggest this." "Well, yeah, it's implied in the field we published in!" (And that collaborator *was* a chemist...)


Yeah, air-sensitive is in fact a big one that (the right type of) chemist would understand implicitly.  For example, any phosphorus in an oxidation state lower than +5 is probably not air-stable (although there are some exceptions), and so many organometallic compounds are air-sensitive, that if you are doing organometallics and you aren't sure, it's probably better to assume it is not air-stable.

Of course, even a chemist might not know this, depending on whether they are an inorganic chemist and whether they ever socialized with people outside their own research group in grad school.
 
2013-09-27 11:56:58 PM  

tetsoushima: [blog.seattlepi.com image 568x426]

Why is the Seattle Fire Department using Instagram?


1st degree burns, 3rd degree lulz.

Acid. Not even once!
 
2013-09-27 11:58:33 PM  

Bacontastesgood: Peki: And this thread has totally inspired me to go back to school to learn some chemistry. I want to learn to read a molecule diagram and go "oh crap" or giggle because everyone is freaking out over water.

Good for you, but just a warning: the biatch of chemistry is that (unlike biology or physics) it takes a long time to get to the really good stuff.  You might look for the condensed/combo classes they often teach for nurses or bio majors, otherwise it's two FULL years before you can even start thinking about things like biochemistry.  I'm sure there are MOOCs that do the condensed thing, too.  Not a good enough foundation if you're going to be a physical scientist or go to med school, but more than fine for brain expansion.

Anyway, that's my 2c FWIW.


Oh, I don't care about the time it would take, and career isn't a concern. If I had the money I'd spend the rest of my life in school.
 
2013-09-27 11:59:01 PM  
Johnny was a chemist.
But Johnny is no more.
What Johnny thought was H2O,
was H2SO4.
 
2013-09-28 12:07:37 AM  

illannoyin: Peki: thisisyourbrainonFark: doglover: HF isn't natural

Isn't everything, when you get down to at the molecular level, organic?

/serious question

Most things labelled organic have carbon in them.

And this thread has totally inspired me to go back to school to learn some chemistry. I want to learn to read a molecule diagram and go "oh crap" or giggle because everyone is freaking out over water.

Little Johnny was a chemist

Little Johnny is no more

For what he thought was H2O

Was H2SO4

Also...

[thebigbangtheoryfansite.com image 500x485]


I hate the Big Bang Theory, and everyone I know who is actually a geek does.
 
2013-09-28 12:09:47 AM  
Not one of you? No Fight Club pic?  I am disappoint    content6.flixster.com
 
2013-09-28 12:10:43 AM  

Peki: I hate the Big Bang Theory, and everyone I know who is actually a geek does.


does what?
 
2013-09-28 12:10:52 AM  

Peki: I hate the Big Bang Theory, and everyone I know who is actually a geek does.


Canned laughter and ancient jokes? What's not to like?
 
2013-09-28 12:17:27 AM  

Thresher: Not one of you? No Fight Club pic?  I am disappoint    [content6.flixster.com image 350x235]


That's just sodium hydroxide -- weak tea.
 
2013-09-28 12:23:26 AM  
One of our idiots in the lab decided he was going to sneak some out of the plant because he figured it would clear a blocked drain at home.  He put it in a plastic bottle, put the bottle in his lunch box and set it on the desk in hi office.  He came back a few minutes later and the acid had eaten all through his lunch box, across the top, peeled paint off the desk and he freaked.  He just new he was going to get fired.  I'm not sure what he told them happened.  Hell, it even ate some finish off of the brand new clay tile in the lab.  He's damn lucky he didn't get some on his leg.  I'm still not sure what it would have done to the plumbing in his house.
 
Displayed 50 of 213 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report