If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Yahoo)   57 percents of incoming freshmen our not ready for the college, k thx bye   (news.yahoo.com) divider line 71
    More: Sappy, THX, SAT Scores, College Board, reading comprehension, freshman, colleges  
•       •       •

2830 clicks; posted to Main » on 27 Sep 2013 at 6:01 PM (40 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



71 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all
 
2013-09-27 06:02:30 PM
I see what you did there subby.
 
2013-09-27 06:02:37 PM
But parenting isn't getting worse.
 
2013-09-27 06:03:40 PM
Degrees really don't mean shiat anymore.


I see way too many college grads who are basically illiterate.
 
2013-09-27 06:04:15 PM
With helpful pic of a typical Mac user?
 
2013-09-27 06:05:08 PM
You mean high school was a waste of time?

i2.cdn.turner.com
 
2013-09-27 06:05:09 PM

The Muthaship: But parenting isn't getting worse.


More like parenting, and the general acceptance (society) of setting the bar low are to blame.
 
2013-09-27 06:06:15 PM
I never did well on my SATs or GRE's.  I took the classes and practice tests.  I took both those tests multiple times and ALWAYS  scored low , more so in the math section than the vocab/writing sections.
What I found out is that I am terrible at taking standardized tests.

/Still got in to college and grad school
 
2013-09-27 06:06:23 PM
My first night at college, three girls came to my dorm room to "get to know me".  I was ready.
 
2013-09-27 06:06:32 PM
Honestly, most people going to college seem like they could benefit from a sort of educational rumspringt. Unless you're 100% motivated to pursue the career or major you're going in for, why not wait a year and get the partying out of the way? It'd cut out the students that have no actual interest in going to college, and you wouldn't have kids with so many changes/freedoms thrust on them at once getting overloaded or losing focus..
 
2013-09-27 06:07:03 PM
yes, it's true verbal and math SAT scores have been declining, but the tweeting and instagramming scores have been off the charts the past few years.
 
2013-09-27 06:07:06 PM

tripleseven: The Muthaship: But parenting isn't getting worse.

More like parenting, and the general acceptance (society) of setting the bar low are to blame.


True.

Also, the student loan problem could largely be solved if the people who have no business going to college to begin with would stay the f*ck out of it and get a job.
 
2013-09-27 06:07:19 PM
To those helicopter parents more interested in "optics" and activities than in educating your children, the strip bar in your daughter's college town and it's patrons wish to thank you.


i.imgur.com
 
2013-09-27 06:07:54 PM

raerae1980: I never did well on my SATs or GRE's.  I took the classes and practice tests.  I took both those tests multiple times and ALWAYS  scored low , more so in the math section than the vocab/writing sections.
What I found out is that I am terrible at taking standardized tests.

/Still got in to college and grad school


I've never agreed with the underlined BS.
 
2013-09-27 06:07:57 PM
....and yet colleges continue to admit them, knowing they'll likely never graduate, but sure they'll spend tens of thousands of dollars on tuition, dorm and dining before they flunk out.
 
2013-09-27 06:10:48 PM

badgerb: I c wat u did thr su b lol


ftfy
 
2013-09-27 06:10:56 PM

tripleseven: Degrees really don't mean shiat anymore.


I see way too many college grads who are basically illiterate.


Degrees that mean shiat:
All Humanities majors
All Sports majors
All Business majors until you hit a masters level

Degrees that are useful:
All math majors
Almost All Science majors, (Don't go for archaeology)
Almost all Engineering majors
Almost all Industrial arts majors (the world always needs welders)

The problem is most people out of HS are crappy at math, so they avoid the useful majors like the plague and instead go into majors where they can copy book-reports from their friends and get A's
 
2013-09-27 06:11:51 PM
Liam Neesons is my shiat, though.
 
2013-09-27 06:12:26 PM

riggerson: ....and yet colleges continue to admit them, knowing they'll likely never graduate, but sure they'll spend tens of thousands of dollars on tuition, dorm and dining before they flunk out.


Which is what any business would do.
They aren't a charity, they're there to make money.
If you can't fly an airplane, I'm still going to sell you one if you ask to buy one.
 
2013-09-27 06:13:02 PM
All I know is that the world needs more gender studies majors.

/not really
 
2013-09-27 06:15:38 PM
well, the world needs ditch diggers too
 
2013-09-27 06:16:51 PM
The American education system is not built to educate so much as it is made for conditioning students to life as a corporate whore. Just keep showing up and don't offend anybody and you will be fine. This does no include ruling class schools, where they learn to rule all of us tools.
 
2013-09-27 06:16:57 PM
I just started a Masters program. Our buildings are surrounded by undergraduate residences and, wow, they look like middle-schoolers. Was I that small back then?
 
2013-09-27 06:16:58 PM

tripleseven: raerae1980: I never did well on my SATs or GRE's.  I took the classes and practice tests.  I took both those tests multiple times and ALWAYS  scored low , more so in the math section than the vocab/writing sections.
What I found out is that I am terrible at taking standardized tests.

/Still got in to college and grad school

I've never agreed with the underlined BS.


*shrugs*   Well, I can't explain it.  I mean, I was a great student, got A's and b's all through school (and college/grad school).   Yet my scores were terrible each time I took the tests.   Again, this is with both SATs and GREs.
 
2013-09-27 06:17:56 PM

Somaticasual: Honestly, most people going to college seem like they could benefit from a sort of educational rumspringt. Unless you're 100% motivated to pursue the career or major you're going in for, why not wait a year and get the partying out of the way? It'd cut out the students that have no actual interest in going to college, and you wouldn't have kids with so many changes/freedoms thrust on them at once getting overloaded or losing focus..


I wish I would have waited, I needed a swift kick in the pants that didn't come until much later.
 
2013-09-27 06:18:17 PM

Big Man On Campus: Almost All Science majors, (Don't go for archaeology)


Funny you should mention that...
 
2013-09-27 06:18:47 PM
And by the time they get their shiny beige pieces of paper, 80% aren't prepared to so much as sling a mop. Alcoholism, drug addiction, and depression will do that to you.
 
2013-09-27 06:19:31 PM

Big Man On Campus: The problem is most people out of HS are crappy at math, so they avoid the useful majors like the plague and instead go into majors where they can copy book-reports from their friends and get A's


Good. The world needs baristas, too.
 
2013-09-27 06:21:30 PM
57%??  That's almost half!
 
2013-09-27 06:23:12 PM

Seth'n'Spectrum: I just started a Masters program. Our buildings are surrounded by undergraduate residences and, wow, they look like middle-schoolers. Was I that small back then?


I know what you mean. I'm teaching a class full of freshman engineers right now, and they look like they're 12.
 
2013-09-27 06:23:40 PM
I'm wondering why the heck this is labeled as "Sappy"...
 
2013-09-27 06:24:45 PM
I found the SAT to not correlate at all with the curriculum in college. The SAT is entirely different than the curriculum in both high school and college. When you have an entire class dedicated towards teaching kids how to take the damn test and score well on it, you know there is a problem. Hell, that is how the AP classes mostly are now. Who gives a shiat about education, everyone just teaches to the test now. Go have any student retake the SAT at the end of college and I can guarantee you their scores will show an overall decline. Why is that? It's because the SATs do not matter. You would think if they mattered, by the end of college, the scores would go up.

If you were to have a student take a comprehensive math test in 9th grade, then again in 12th grade without the content changing - shouldn't the students score higher? The decline in the SAT scores seems more to point out that the content is no longer relevant with the test itself. Kids are plenty smart now, despite the obvious flaws in grammar and spelling you see all of the time.
 
2013-09-27 06:25:54 PM
They should try to ketchup.

content.costco.com
 
2013-09-27 06:26:19 PM

raerae1980: I never did well on my SATs or GRE's.  I took the classes and practice tests.  I took both those tests multiple times and ALWAYS  scored low , more so in the math section than the vocab/writing sections.
What I found out is that I am terrible at taking standardized tests.

/Still got in to college and grad school



How did you get into grad school with poor GRE subject scores?  Both my Master's and Doctoral programs (at two different universities) required at least a 50% score on the subject GRE to be even considered for admission.  The average score in each program was much higher than 50%, though.

Every American grad program I know of requires the general GRE which is even easier than the SAT.  I snoozed my way through it with a score of 1590 out of a possible 1600.
 
2013-09-27 06:26:50 PM

FrancoFile: 57%??  That's almost half!


I was in a deli and I asked for 500 grams of salami in my best italian (*which means: my italian sucks).

The woman behind the counter broke into english: "500 grams?! That's almost a KILO!!"


/it's exactly HALF a kilo...
//I understood where she was coming from, it's a farker-load of meat.
///I ate it all.
 
2013-09-27 06:28:29 PM

Saul T. Balzac: I snoozed my way through it with a score of 1590 out of a possible 1600.


Amazingly, every Farker who has ever taken it did better than that.

/first liar doesn't have a chance....
 
2013-09-27 06:29:23 PM

Saul T. Balzac: How did you get into grad school with poor GRE subject scores?


I got into grad school with NO GRE scores.

/It's called drive-through Grad School, my alma mater JHU does it for the cash.
 
2013-09-27 06:30:34 PM

Saul T. Balzac: raerae1980: I never did well on my SATs or GRE's.  I took the classes and practice tests.  I took both those tests multiple times and ALWAYS  scored low , more so in the math section than the vocab/writing sections.
What I found out is that I am terrible at taking standardized tests.

/Still got in to college and grad school


How did you get into grad school with poor GRE subject scores?  Both my Master's and Doctoral programs (at two different universities) required at least a 50% score on the subject GRE to be even considered for admission.  The average score in each program was much higher than 50%, though.

Every American grad program I know of requires the general GRE which is even easier than the SAT.  I snoozed my way through it with a score of 1590 out of a possible 1600.


Not all of them.  NYU being one and CSULA being the other.  Since I knew I would have weak scores, my professors and I concentrated on schools that did not use them.   To be honest, I did get quite a few rejections but I still managed to find two that accepted me.  When I did my undergrad degree, I enrolled as a Non-traditional student ( I was a little older by then) so they did not require SAT scores.
 
2013-09-27 06:33:08 PM

mekkab: FrancoFile: 57%??  That's almost half!

I was in a deli and I asked for 500 grams of salami in my best italian (*which means: my italian sucks).

The woman behind the counter broke into english: "500 grams?! That's almost a KILO!!"


/it's exactly HALF a kilo...
//I understood where she was coming from, it's a farker-load of meat.
///I ate it all.


It's 1.1 pounds.  Not at all an unusual amount to order.  Maybe a lot to eat in one sitting, but still.
 
2013-09-27 06:34:44 PM

Xlr8urfark: Somaticasual: Honestly, most people going to college seem like they could benefit from a sort of educational rumspringt. Unless you're 100% motivated to pursue the career or major you're going in for, why not wait a year and get the partying out of the way? It'd cut out the students that have no actual interest in going to college, and you wouldn't have kids with so many changes/freedoms thrust on them at once getting overloaded or losing focus..

I wish I would have waited, I needed a swift kick in the pants that didn't come until much later.



Me, too.  I started college at 16.  I was more than academically ready, but far from ready in many other ways.  I ended up with a liberal arts degree at age 20 instead of the physics degree I really should have gotten.  What a waste of a free ride to college.

I worked for a while, then went back to school when I was older, borrowing to pay for the second degree.  No one gives grants or scholarships to people who already have bachelor's degrees, my employer didn't offer any educational benefits, and by this time---the early 2000s---tuition has risen enough that working and going to school just wasn't possible.  So I borrowed, and I have zero regrets.

My PhD was paid for, though.
 
2013-09-27 06:39:35 PM

raerae1980:   NYU being one and CSULA being the other.  Since I knew I would have weak scores, my professors and I concentrated on schools that did not use them.   To be honest, I did get quite a few rejections but I still managed to find two that accepted me.  When I did my undergrad degree, I enrolled as a Non-traditional student ( I was a little older by then) so they did not require SAT scores.


According to NYU's math grad program's website:

"General GRE (Graduate Record Examination) scores are required of all applicants (except non-degree); applicants for the Ph.D. program must also provide the subject GRE score, preferably in mathematics, but accepted in other relevant sciences."

http://math.nyu.edu/degree/phd/application.html
 
2013-09-27 06:51:58 PM

endmile: Seth'n'Spectrum: I just started a Masters program. Our buildings are surrounded by undergraduate residences and, wow, they look like middle-schoolers. Was I that small back then?

I know what you mean. I'm teaching a class full of freshman engineers right now, and they look like they're 12.


I am also teaching a bunch of freshman engineers, and some of them really need to consider the possibility that if introductory physics is kicking their ass, then perhaps engineering is not the best choice for them.
 
2013-09-27 06:53:30 PM

endmile: Seth'n'Spectrum: I just started a Masters program. Our buildings are surrounded by undergraduate residences and, wow, they look like middle-schoolers. Was I that small back then?

I know what you mean. I'm teaching a class full of freshman engineers right now, and they look like they're 12.


I went back to a 10 year high school reunion and thought it was funny how small the football team was. Probably just a coincidence, but maybe there's something to it:

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2004/apr/04/usa

(old article I know)
 
2013-09-27 06:58:05 PM

Saul T. Balzac: raerae1980:   NYU being one and CSULA being the other.  Since I knew I would have weak scores, my professors and I concentrated on schools that did not use them.   To be honest, I did get quite a few rejections but I still managed to find two that accepted me.  When I did my undergrad degree, I enrolled as a Non-traditional student ( I was a little older by then) so they did not require SAT scores.

According to NYU's math grad program's website:

"General GRE (Graduate Record Examination) scores are required of all applicants (except non-degree); applicants for the Ph.D. program must also provide the subject GRE score, preferably in mathematics, but accepted in other relevant sciences."

http://math.nyu.edu/degree/phd/application.html


Firstly, I applied for an MA to their Anthropology department.  Secondly, when I visited the school and talked to the faculty there, they told me to submit it but they do not look at it.  This was a huge concern of mine so I made sure to check with them.   So, I think it's up to the department's discretion.  I should have been clear on that.  I think every MA program I applied to required I submit my scores, but not every program considered it or placed much emphasis on it.  I had a few departments tell me that.  This was also back in 2005 when I was applying everywhere.   Like I said, most places did check and use the scores.  I got rejected from those programs.
 
2013-09-27 06:59:08 PM

tripleseven: Degrees really don't mean shiat anymore.


I see way too many college grads who are basically illiterate.


I know what you mean. I did all my work on my own in college, because I realized I actually had to learn the material and understand the concepts behind it. Most of my peers didn't do this, they would all gather together and do the work as a group. Then wonder why they failed exams. The professors ended up dumbing down the exams to bring up the average grade, so they wouldn't look like they were failing at doing their job.

The majority of recent graduates are like this. Went through the motions, and did the bare minimum to get their piece of paper, and didn't actually grow or learn anything.
 
2013-09-27 07:03:38 PM
www.upl.co
 
2013-09-27 07:06:03 PM
The idiocracy.

It is beginning.
 
2013-09-27 07:09:06 PM

raerae1980: I never did well on my SATs or GRE's.  I took the classes and practice tests.  I took both those tests multiple times and ALWAYS  scored low , more so in the math section than the vocab/writing sections.
What I found out is that I am terrible at taking standardized tests.

/Still got in to college and grad school


Congrats on your humanities degree.
 
2013-09-27 07:09:48 PM

raerae1980: Big Man On Campus: Almost All Science majors, (Don't go for archaeology)

Funny you should mention that...


---- DITTO.
I went through arch. field school, geology minor, etc. from a decent school and the job prospects were dismal, luckily I learned HTML my senior year and started doing websites when the internet was in its infancy.
Been a techie ever since.
I'm glad I got the education though.

Another thing.... OBVIOUS tag at the kegger?
 
2013-09-27 07:12:23 PM
I know I shouldn't pick on TFA too much, but it is an article about a test for kids who are trying to get into college:

"We must dramatically increase the number of students in K-12 who are prepared for college and careers," College Board President David Coleman said in a statement.

No.  We really don't.  Perhaps you should consider focusing on the number of 10th - 12th graders who are prepared for college and careers?  Just a suggestion.

the number of minority students taking part in the SATs has increased significantly over five years ago

Um, I think you're missing the word, "from" there, Mr. Journalist Guy.

Those students planning to study the physical sciences rounded out the top, averaging a score of 1,673 on their SATs. The most popular degree tracks - education (1442), psychology (1484) and business management and marketing (1661) fell further down the scale,

Hm, a correlation between mediocre test stores and those planning on becoming teachers.  Gee, I wonder if that has anything to do with students getting low test scores.

The College Board, which helps students prepare for the SAT and other college course tests

The SAT is a "college course test?"  What's that?
 
2013-09-27 07:14:28 PM
lmaobama.com
 
Displayed 50 of 71 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report