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(About.com)   Fark Food Thread: What do you make that's traditional from your upbringing? Something true to your cultural heritage. Did you have the recipe passed down to you? Share the good stuff and show us how it's done right   (easteuropeanfood.about.com) divider line 250
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882 clicks; posted to Main » on 27 Sep 2013 at 11:59 AM (28 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-09-27 08:32:24 AM
I grew up on Hamburger Helper and instant potatoes.  The only culinary tradition passed down from my family is that store-brand cereal is bullsh*t.
 
2013-09-27 08:32:35 AM
I like velveeta.

It gets soft when it's warm

It's spelled kind of like velvet
 
2013-09-27 08:32:55 AM
Kugel.
Yes.
No.
 
2013-09-27 08:33:22 AM
Hoppin' John

Take an onion and cut it up and put it in a crock pot or slow cook pot on the stove with water blackeyed peas, and some hamhocks or hog jowls and black pepper and let it go all night.

You can use bone in ham, or bacon.

It's for new year's day and cures a hangover.
 
2013-09-27 08:35:19 AM

vudukungfu: Hoppin' John

Take an onion and cut it up and put it in a crock pot or slow cook pot on the stove with water blackeyed peas, and some hamhocks or hog jowls and black pepper and let it go all night.

You can use bone in ham, or bacon.

It's for new year's day and cures a hangover.


I like the name
 
vpb [TotalFark]
2013-09-27 08:41:44 AM
Cornbread made with bacon drippings.
 
2013-09-27 08:47:57 AM
the only big one is cranberry pudding, recipe that comes from my Dad's mom (may go further back, but that is where the version we have comes from)

It gets made every Christmas at least, sometimes Thanksgiving as well

I don't have the exact recipe in front of me at the moment but this is pretty close, although ours gets made as one large cake and cut into portions
 
2013-09-27 08:48:19 AM
Not telling! Marry your own Italian. But honestly our cuisine, like all others, varies from region to region. My family comes from southern italy (campania), so we use lots of pasta and breads, our sauces tend to be more tomato based vs. cream and there are vegetarian options. Dishes tend to be more popular based on season and catholic holidays.

My favorite time of year (eatin' wise) is Easter; meat pies, artichokes, chard, asparagus, lamb chops ... my biggest tip would be to make your own pasta, eff that Barilla dude. They freeze well and cook in a few minutes, fresh pasta also holds the sauces so much better and really absorbs flavor.

http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/mario-batali/fresh-pasta-recipe/i nd ex.html
 
2013-09-27 08:51:54 AM

Kyro: I grew up on Hamburger Helper and instant potatoes.  The only culinary tradition passed down from my family is that store-brand cereal is bullsh*t.


In other words, the bar was set pretty low, so I can roast a chicken once in a while and I'm set for all the sex I can handle for months.
 
2013-09-27 08:53:03 AM
My mother's Colombian rice and beans served with fried plantains (green ones, usually, and extra crunchy).
 
2013-09-27 08:55:25 AM
Polish family recipes don't get given away.
 
2013-09-27 08:56:38 AM
It's called "Tater Tot Casserole."

You take a pound of ground beef and brown and drain it. Then you mix in a can of cream of mushroom soup and a can of peas. Pour that into a casserole dish and top with frozen tater tots. Then you bake it at, like, 400 or so for 30 minutes or so.

Ta-da!
 
2013-09-27 08:57:02 AM
Thanksgiving is coming.

Green Chile cornbread stuffing.

Combines the Southwest and New England heritages in my family.
 
2013-09-27 08:57:18 AM

Sarcastica75: My mother's Colombian rice and beans served with fried plantains (green ones, usually, and extra crunchy).


something, something, your Columbian mother, something offensive

I'm sorry.

that was mean
 
2013-09-27 08:59:02 AM

professorkowalski: Polish family recipes don't get given away.


Neither do Irish, but that's done out of kindness for other people
 
2013-09-27 08:59:05 AM

Kyro: I grew up on Hamburger Helper and instant potatoes.  The only culinary tradition passed down from my family is that store-brand cereal is bullsh*t.


That is awesome!
 
2013-09-27 09:00:21 AM
I have lots but one thing that's probably fairly unusual is this thing my mom and dad used to eat.  Crumble up corn bread and smother with pinto beans, then drizzle pickle juice all over the whole thing.  It's...well, it's pretty damn good.
 
2013-09-27 09:00:24 AM
Pinto beans (we call them brown beans) cooked in a slow-cooker with a slab of fat-back
Fried potatoes, sliced and fried in an iron skillet with bacon grease until the thinner slices get a black crust
Corn bread, made with buttermilk and 7 tablespoons of melted butter, baked in an iron skillet.
 
2013-09-27 09:01:10 AM
Kyro and I come from very similar culinary traditions, I think.
 
2013-09-27 09:01:44 AM

professorkowalski: Polish family recipes don't get given away.


I love golumkis. Cabbage rolls stuffed with pork and rice.

Also Kapusta. Kind of a stew.
 
2013-09-27 09:02:18 AM

kwame: I have lots but one thing that's probably fairly unusual is this thing my mom and dad used to eat.  Crumble up corn bread and smother with pinto beans, then drizzle pickle juice all over the whole thing.  It's...well, it's pretty damn good.


I use pickled peppers, but yeah.. that is awesome.
 
2013-09-27 09:02:57 AM
I'd tell you how to make a proper English Trifle, but then I'd have to kill you all.
 
2013-09-27 09:04:00 AM

kwame: I have lots but one thing that's probably fairly unusual is this thing my mom and dad used to eat.  Crumble up corn bread and smother with pinto beans, then drizzle pickle juice all over the whole thing.  It's...well, it's pretty damn good.


whoa. genius.
 
2013-09-27 09:04:08 AM

Shostie: Kyro and I come from very similar culinary traditions, I think.


You want me to send your wife some herbs for the roast chicken?
 
2013-09-27 09:04:38 AM

Shostie: Kyro and I come from very similar culinary traditions, I think.


Kraft cheese single-slices on bologna, amirite?
 
2013-09-27 09:07:14 AM

vernonFL: professorkowalski: Polish family recipes don't get given away.

I love golumkis. Cabbage rolls stuffed with pork and rice.

Also Kapusta. Kind of a stew.


Thanks for telling me things I already knew.

And its golabki.
 
2013-09-27 09:09:19 AM

Kyro: Shostie: Kyro and I come from very similar culinary traditions, I think.

Kraft cheese single-slices on bologna, amirite?


Lucky bastard, I didn't even get the bologna most of the time. Usually it was gubmit cheese on white bread with mayo

My mom worked as a manager for KFC for about a year too, I think we had fried chicken and stale slaw with potatoes and that gravy shiat almost 3 or 4 nights a week for that year. I couldn't bring myself to even smell KFC for years after that.
 
2013-09-27 09:10:06 AM
I make Yuhka - traditional sauerkraut soup. It is banging, with kielbasa, dried mushrooms and barley.

I make potato soup with bacon and dumplings and fresh parsley.

I make another dish with cabbage and dumplings and bacon.

bacon.

My hubby's half Polish. I need to make him some glunkies or however you spell it. But he will eat the other stuff just fine...
 
2013-09-27 09:10:11 AM

Alpha Sierra Foxtrot: Shostie: Kyro and I come from very similar culinary traditions, I think.

You want me to send your wife some herbs for the roast chicken?


Oh, no. I know how to cook. Now, that is. When my wife and I got together I started teaching myself. As for the roast chicken, I generally just spray it with oil and sprinkle on a generous amount of Tony's. It always turns out good.

Kyro: Kraft cheese single-slices on bologna, amirite?


*bro-fist*
 
DGS [TotalFark]
2013-09-27 09:12:43 AM

gilatrout: Thanksgiving is coming.

Green Chile cornbread stuffing.

Combines the Southwest and New England heritages in my family.


Oh jeez does that sound good.
 
2013-09-27 09:13:02 AM

IamKaiserSoze!!!: Columbian


with an 'o', good sir, or i shall challenge you to a duel.

and then celebrate with some fried yuca dipped in garlic sauce.
 
2013-09-27 09:14:02 AM

silo123j: glunkies


You mean rice, and ground lamb rolled in either cabbage leaves or grape leaves?
Steamed, and served in a weak tomato sauce?
 
2013-09-27 09:15:01 AM

halupkies

 
2013-09-27 09:16:21 AM

Gołąbki

 
2013-09-27 09:17:44 AM

vudukungfu: Gołąbki


Thanks for paying attention.

I already said that.
 
2013-09-27 09:18:56 AM

professorkowalski: vudukungfu: Gołąbki

Thanks for paying attention.

I already said that.


So when the headline asked for posters to share their culinary traditions, you were actually answering for him?
 
2013-09-27 09:19:49 AM
Being French, from time to time I like to serve dinner mon dieu - including Frahnch fries ... Frahnch dressing ... and Frahnch bread.  And to drink ...Pay-roo!
 
2013-09-27 09:22:43 AM
Holubky, Goulash, Chicken Paprikash, Povitica, etc.
Yes, I do have recipes handed down generation to generation for gods know how long.
No, I am not sharing them with y'all.
 
2013-09-27 09:23:50 AM
This is a nice fall soup dish.
if you are partial to fish.
 
2013-09-27 09:25:04 AM
I also make spanakopita  and baklava.
 
2013-09-27 09:28:15 AM
Sometimes, for lunch at work, I'll whip up rajma-chaval on a Sunday, then stir it all up and pack it in wraps for lunches. It nukes quick and easy and goes well with a small salad that I also prep up on Sunday and pack fresh in every day. I make my own dressing out of sesame oil, brown sugar, minces garlic and minces ginger, and a bit of white rice vinegar.
 
2013-09-27 09:31:04 AM

minoridiot: Being French, from time to time I like to serve dinner mon dieu - including Frahnch fries ... Frahnch dressing ... and Frahnch bread.  And to drink ...Pay-roo!


Ha ha haahahahahah

I got the recipe from the ladies home journal. The mail got wet in the rain and some of the pages ran together, but what I couldn't read, I improvised with my own little creative ideas, you see, it has raisins in it. You like raisins.
 
2013-09-27 09:33:13 AM
It's times like this I wish I had a culture other than "European American mutt".  The closest removed from any old country in my family is my grandmother, whose grandfather came from Wales, but she doesn't know any Welsh recipes.  She does fry up some mean mush though.
 
2013-09-27 09:34:35 AM
I grew up in the South, between South Carolina, Louisiana and Texas, and a damn lot of other bases, and wound up in New England, and spent some time in Florida and playing around the Caribbean for a while.

It makes my cuisine a little schizophrenic.

My family is from Mizzoura though. Which means that BBQ tends to follow the KC model, with a heavy sauce with tomato and molasses. Last night at the restaurant we ran ribs, and yeah it took some time, but having spent that time in Texas, and elsewhere, that means the ribs have evolved a bit. It doubled up on a dry rub, with not just chilies, but a bit clove, cinnamon, and the contrast with the wood smoke makes for a satisfying chunk of meat. My BBQ tends to fuse the different cuisines that I've been exposed to over the years.

The one thing that I don't compromise on, or try to fuse, is chowder. Or baked beans. That's the influence of my Down East'ah Uncle Brian. Chowder has bacon or salt pork, dammit. Nothing terrible fancy in the process. Onions sauteed in said pork fat, and when just limp, then add celery to wilt down a bit, salt and pepper, add in juice from your clams, said clams, and I prefer a bit of butter added at this point, and then  diced potatoes, and then add only enough water to cover said potatoes and the rest of the mash, and a couple of bay leaves. If you are feeling a little GiGi, maybe a bit of thyme.  Milk and heavy cream added after the potatoes are tender. The starch from the potatoes should provide all the thickener you will need, but you CAN adjust the thickness with roux--I am not such a stickler that I will rule out such a thing, but for Hells sake, don't use a corn starch slurry. That is an abomination.  For baked beans, I prefer to use navy beans, onion, mustard, molasses, salt and pepper, and a heavy lashings of salt pork. Bacon? That's not Down East, that's heading back towards Texas and the like, and while not bad, it is more suitable for corn bread and open skies, with bits of pepper, chilies, and chasing of coyotes away from camp. With Maine baked beans, you are looking for a long, extended cook, with lashings of brown bread. If I'm in a relative hurry, and don't have the time to soak beans overnight, and do the whole thing, and wake up, and realize that I NEED beans for a Saturday, and after years of living Down East, that is really the traditional day for baked beans, and then you have them for Sunday and Monday too, then it's B&M from a can, but you are still throwing the suckers in a big ass cast iron to go low and slow with your pork and onion. Mustard IS a must in this case.

My upbringing was as an Army Brat. Which, again, means that it was schizophrenic with influences. Not just from all the places we were stationed, but even among those postings, that meant being surrounded by families from all over. Even in Germany, my best friends families were often Mexican, Puerto Rican, Italian, or heavily Irish, not to mention all the Korean and Japanese. I was as likely to wind up at lunch with folks brown bagging ham and cheese sandwiches, as kids with rice balls with bits of meat and vegetables hidden in the center. I like to do rice balls still to this day, with short grain rice, coated with toasted sesame seeds, and bury a bit of spiced pork with bok choy, onion, scallion, and garlic, with a bit of soy and sweet sauce in the center. They make great portable meals, and there is something satisfying about that hunk of rice heavy with pickles and pork, when others are complaining about white bread cheese sammiches.

The nice thing about a lot of "traditional" cuisines, is the heavy influence of the working class culture. It's grounding to use these recipes, because it's good honest food. They're the sorts of things that have stood the test of time, because they provide solid nutrition, as well as a heartiness that is satisfying as all get out. Don't get me wrong, there's a lot of fun to be had to doing some fancy bit of haute cuisine, because they're pretty, and you're trying out new flavors, new combinations, but doing traditional cuisine well, that takes practice, and it means executing with precision.

One of the greatest compliments I ever got, was from a wee tiny old lady who came up to me after service while I was at the Iron Horse, and had done up some steak and tatty pie. She was so pleased to see a dish from her home, after years of being in the Valley to join her kids. "It reminded me of my Mum, but of course her's weren't quite as fine and nice as yours..." and I blushed all the way down to my toes. That's the power of good, traditional cuisine, is that connects you to those roots, it's a shortcut to deep sense memories, and transporting you right back to those days when you were little, and nothing cuts through the fog of years, as those foods, those tastes, and smells.
 
2013-09-27 09:41:47 AM
I sit in the lawn chair and drink and sometimes pitch washers.
 
2013-09-27 09:42:33 AM

EatenTheSun: I sit in the lawn chair and drink and sometimes pitch washers.


And usually there is bbq pit nearby.
 
2013-09-27 09:43:29 AM
For hoppin john, you soak the dried black eyed peas overnight.
Drain and rinse and put in the pot.
Add a chopped onion, fine or course, depending upon how you like it.
Then a good dash of black pepper, and whatever Ham product you like, although, for the best healing properties, you want bone marrow stewing in there.
I will save up the sliced bone-in ham bones with trimmings on them and put them in a baggie in the freezer until I have a dozen.
So the thing just simmers all freaking 12 hours at least, so the marrow is out, the onions are clear, the ham is just bits, and the beans are squishy.
Nectar of the gawds.

If you find you made more than you can eat, you may IQF (individually quick freeze) portions in tupperwear, just don't "burp" the lid until it is frozen.
 
2013-09-27 09:43:38 AM
I make good kugel and brisket but neither are family recipes.
 
DGS [TotalFark]
2013-09-27 09:44:09 AM
I grew up in the midwest with hardly anything 'cultural' passed down in the kitchen. Some things we picked up from my father growing up on a WI dairy farm, other were just 'this food is simple, go'. It wasn't bad, but it wasn't anything that sang with heritage or anything. I've taken a lot from what my parents cooked and then dove off in different directions.

Wifey's family is Russian, so everything is based off that and it sometimes takes me by surprise. Still, there've been some interesting things I've really taken to. Others... well, no. Heh.

The following are examples since I can't read wifey's cookbook that was her mothers, all in Russian script.

Herring Salad
Olivier (Russian Potato Salad)
Plov (most often made with Lamb, I found)
Borsch (of course)
Muraveinik - 'Anthill cake' that's essentially crumbled cookie mixed with caramel and pressed together into a mound. It's -incredibly- rich and I can't eat much before it overwhelms me. You end up cutting these really thin pieces that look like you're skimping on sharing, but they fill you up so fast.
 
2013-09-27 09:44:13 AM
Throw some meat and vegetables into a pot and boil the living dog-piss out of it.  Drain the water, and serve.

The next day, fry the leftovers in butter, then serve.

/English heritage.
 
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