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(International Business Times)   Attention passengers: these are your captains snoring   (ibtimes.com) divider line 15
    More: Weird, Civil Aviation Authority, Airbus A330, Air New Zealand, sleeping on the job, Virgin Atlantic, Transportation Safety Board, sleep apnea, passengers  
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2753 clicks; posted to Main » on 26 Sep 2013 at 1:52 PM (42 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



15 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2013-09-26 01:29:53 PM
Surely they can't be serious.
 
2013-09-26 02:05:54 PM
They both had the lasagna.
 
2013-09-26 02:07:32 PM
I would love to read the article.  But it put my browser into a "crash and attempt to recover" loop.

Nice farking coding, jerkoffs.
 
2013-09-26 02:14:43 PM
Maybe they should, you know... put them on mandatory rest cycles between flights instead of saving some of the billions of dollars they make in fees and not hire another flight crew.  I'm sure the insurance covers most of the payout if they auger the plane into the ground though, so hey... why not fly them on quick turnaround and save a few bucks?
 
2013-09-26 02:29:48 PM

durbnpoisn: I would love to read the article.  But it put my browser into a "crash and attempt to recover" loop.

Nice farking coding, jerkoffs.


Ditto
 
2013-09-26 02:51:04 PM

powhound: They both had the lasagna.


and we're done here!
 
2013-09-26 02:51:29 PM
It won't matter for much longer.  The technology to automatically land and taxi to the gate already exists, it's just not in most planes yet, but it's coming soon.  Most of the flight is already automated.

Passenger planes will probably keep having redundant pilots for another 30 years or so, because it'll take a while for people to be comfortable with fully automated planes.  It'll happen sooner for cargo.
 
2013-09-26 03:18:15 PM
www.washingtonpost.com
*Snnnrrrk-* "Wha-....uh where the hell are we?"
 
2013-09-26 04:23:13 PM
What was gained by reporting it?
 
2013-09-26 04:27:10 PM

The water was cold: durbnpoisn: I would love to read the article.  But it put my browser into a "crash and attempt to recover" loop.

Nice farking coding, jerkoffs.

Ditto


It wasn't very interesting.
They woke up about the same time, at altitude, and decided to tell everyone about it.
 
2013-09-26 04:28:56 PM

Grapple: Maybe they should, you know... put them on mandatory rest cycles between flights instead of saving some of the billions of dollars they make in fees and not hire another flight crew.  I'm sure the insurance covers most of the payout if they auger the plane into the ground though, so hey... why not fly them on quick turnaround and save a few bucks?


Except for the takeoffs and landings (and the rare emergencies), commercial flying is a boring job.
 
2013-09-26 06:10:00 PM

Grapple: Maybe they should, you know... put them on mandatory rest cycles between flights instead of saving some of the billions of dollars they make in fees and not hire another flight crew.  I'm sure the insurance covers most of the payout if they auger the plane into the ground though, so hey... why not fly them on quick turnaround and save a few bucks?


THIS
 
2013-09-26 06:13:35 PM
Wonder why there is not something like a "reset safety control"  that train Engineers touch every 60 seconds.    I can see not having to touch a button while flying, but there could be a voice activated variation.
 
2013-09-26 11:53:17 PM

kqc7011: Wonder why there is not something like a "reset safety control"  that train Engineers touch every 60 seconds.    I can see not having to touch a button while flying, but there could be a voice activated variation.


Such a thing is only necessary when there is only one operator and no automatic controls. Steam trains didn't have one because the fireman could stop the train if the engineer became incapacitated. Airliners don't have one because there are always two pilots and an autopilot. It's perfectly safe for one pilot to sleep as long as the other pilot is awake and the autopilot is functional.
 
2013-09-27 10:53:03 AM
img.fark.net
 
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