If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Slashdot)   For every game developer *not* interested in making "Call of Duty 19: Assault on Disneyworld," Kickstarter is increasingly the way to go for funding   (slashdot.org) divider line 142
    More: Interesting, disneyworld, Kickstarter, Clinical study design, Indiegogo  
•       •       •

1451 clicks; posted to Geek » on 26 Sep 2013 at 10:59 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



142 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | » | Last | Show all
 
2013-09-26 10:11:04 AM  
Well I, for one, would love to go on the "It's a Small Small World" ride with a shotgun.
 
2013-09-26 10:16:07 AM  
It's all well and good until a big project that promises a lot goes tits up and everyone loses. Most people know it's a bit of a gamble to essentially pay up front, sight unseen, but a big failure will wobble everyones confidence for the future. Still, I hope it goes well.
 
2013-09-26 10:22:16 AM  
After contributing to Torment: Tides of Numenera, I decided to withhold support for any future Kickstarter projects for some time.

And then Mighty No. 9 was announced.

And then WayForward announced this project.
/God Damnit.
 
2013-09-26 10:30:15 AM  
Can it with the "For $10,000 we will make YOU a minor character in Forcemeat: OperationNarnia AND send you three "Step off fraggit" lapel pins AND name our next goldfish after your mom"  and just give me some got damned points on the profits like the old got damned days when an investor was an investor and not just a got damned fanboy!

GAAAAHHHHHHHH!
 
2013-09-26 10:33:06 AM  

brap: Can it with the "For $10,000 we will make YOU a minor character in Forcemeat: OperationNarnia AND send you three "Step off fraggit" lapel pins AND name our next goldfish after your mom"  and just give me some got damned points on the profits like the old got damned days when an investor was an investor and not just a got damned fanboy!

GAAAAHHHHHHHH!


uh...then just contact the development team directly and don't donate through kickstarter?
 
2013-09-26 10:46:59 AM  

Dimensio: After contributing to Torment: Tides of Numenera, I decided to withhold support for any future Kickstarter projects for some time.

And then Mighty No. 9 was announced.

And then WayForward announced this project.
/God Damnit.


I'm still letting money save up so I can contribute to Star Citizen.
 
2013-09-26 10:56:00 AM  
Just going to say this: The purpose of Kickstarter is to act as a means of philanthropy, and is a means to maintain the fixed, tangible nature of the best games.  The next developer who pledges a Kickstarter that features free-to-play or DLC elements gets a proper punch in the groin.
 
2013-09-26 10:56:23 AM  
Here's the magic games formula:

1) Spend as little as possible until your playtesting shows a positive return-on-investment via in-game monetization.

2) Dump all your money into marketing.

Game developers are now glorified money pumps. Anyone interested in doing anything even slightly out of the mainstream is going to have to go through alternate channels.
 
2013-09-26 10:56:45 AM  

brap: Can it with the "For $10,000 we will make YOU a minor character in Forcemeat: OperationNarnia AND send you three "Step off fraggit" lapel pins AND name our next goldfish after your mom"  and just give me some got damned points on the profits like the old got damned days when an investor was an investor and not just a got damned fanboy!

GAAAAHHHHHHHH!


"Thank you for your investment of $30. We will remit to you your 0.00000000000000000000000000000000003 percent of the profits, should there be any. Which there won't."
 
2013-09-26 10:57:23 AM  

brap: and just give me some got damned points on the profits


What if their project isn't designed to generate profit? I've contributed to a lot of kickstarters that simply wanted to produce a result and not have an ongoing product for sale.
 
2013-09-26 10:59:25 AM  

Mike_LowELL: The next developer who pledges a Kickstarter that features free-to-play or DLC elements gets a proper punch in the groin.


I just talked to a game dev friend of mine over the weekend who works for a F2P studio. He said that 100% of their profits come from 5% of the users, and they have some users who will literally spend hundreds of thousands of dollars on a single F2P game.

They really just need three things to make a game viable: a few "whales" willing to spend tons of money, a small userbase of paying players, and enough free players to make it fun for the first two categories.

Remember: if you're not paying, YOU are the product.
 
2013-09-26 11:01:06 AM  

Mike_LowELL: Just going to say this: The purpose of Kickstarter is to act as a means of philanthropy, and is a means to maintain the fixed, tangible nature of the best games.  The next developer who pledges a Kickstarter that features free-to-play or DLC elements gets a proper punch in the groin.


Hahahahaha, funny you mention that: Backers Livid Over Carmageddon Kickstarter
 
2013-09-26 11:01:58 AM  
We've gone from complaining about day-one DLC to giving money to companies for games that may or may not ever exist.
 
2013-09-26 11:02:48 AM  

Fubini: I just talked to a game dev friend of mine over the weekend who works for a F2P studio. He said that 100% of their profits come from 5% of the users, and they have some users who will literally spend hundreds of thousands of dollars on a single F2P game.


Yup.  And it's a profoundly toxic game model, because profitability is not predicated on any innate quality of the game, where hundreds of thousands of players have to make that vote of quality.  It's predicated on securing a large enough audience and milking the compulsive players who are spending money based on more simplistic urges.  There's really no argument that free-to-play gives you a better game.  It only gives players a less expensive game.
 
2013-09-26 11:07:08 AM  

Barry Lyndon's Annuity Cheque: We've gone from complaining about day-one DLC to giving money to companies for games that may or may not ever exist.


While Kickstarter is a risky venture,  getting funded places a legal obligation on the entity to complete the project. That doesn't mean that you're going to get what you contributed for, and it certainly doesn't guarantee that you'll be able to get their money back. But it's not a "this might happen if I give the money" situation. Getting funded does mean that the game  should exist.
 
2013-09-26 11:07:31 AM  

scottydoesntknow: Hahahahaha, funny you mention that: Backers Livid Over Carmageddon Kickstarter


And that farkface who responded has the gall to claim that the expansion pack model in any way resembles DLC.  What a jackass.  Expansion packs weren't simply superior because they gave you significantly more bang for your buck.  Expansion packs create a clear, titled, aesthetically-significant revision point that players can return to if the expansion pack is not satisfactory.  So rather than forcing players to pick and choose which content they want to consider "canon" or part of their play experience, they can right back to The King of Fighters '98, or The King of Fighters 2000, or XI, or XIII, or whichever version of the game that they want to play.  The player doesn't have to worry about a lack of standardization in the house rules.
 
2013-09-26 11:14:46 AM  
I think I would want to save disneyworld for a fallout game, but that's just me.
 
2013-09-26 11:15:07 AM  

t3knomanser: Barry Lyndon's Annuity Cheque: We've gone from complaining about day-one DLC to giving money to companies for games that may or may not ever exist.

While Kickstarter is a risky venture,  getting funded places a legal obligation on the entity to complete the project. That doesn't mean that you're going to get what you contributed for, and it certainly doesn't guarantee that you'll be able to get their money back. But it's not a "this might happen if I give the money" situation. Getting funded does mean that the game  should exist.


I was under the impression that Kickstarter in no way polices that. I guess we'll see what happens when Tim Schafer fails to release his game.
 
2013-09-26 11:15:37 AM  

brap: Can it with the "For $10,000 we will make YOU a minor character in Forcemeat: OperationNarnia AND send you three "Step off fraggit" lapel pins AND name our next goldfish after your mom"  and just give me some got damned points on the profits like the old got damned days when an investor was an investor and not just a got damned fanboy!

GAAAAHHHHHHHH!


Then don't invest through Kickstarter.
 
2013-09-26 11:15:59 AM  
cdn.steamcommunity.com
 
2013-09-26 11:17:19 AM  
I usually dislike first-person shooter games due to their rampaging violence - but I do admit to getting a wee bit of a boner about this one.
 
2013-09-26 11:19:37 AM  

Barry Lyndon's Annuity Cheque: I was under the impression that Kickstarter in no way polices that. I guess we'll see what happens when Tim Schafer fails to release his game.


Kickstarter doesn't enforce that, no. They have no mechanism with which to enforce that. But it is their policy, and it is in the contract with project creators.
 
2013-09-26 11:19:58 AM  

gnosis301: brap: Can it with the "For $10,000 we will make YOU a minor character in Forcemeat: OperationNarnia AND send you three "Step off fraggit" lapel pins AND name our next goldfish after your mom"  and just give me some got damned points on the profits like the old got damned days when an investor was an investor and not just a got damned fanboy!

GAAAAHHHHHHHH!

Then don't invest through Kickstarter.


yeah, i feel like they should incorporate equity into the project through kickstarter, otherwise it's just charity for a gift bag.

/ perhaps I'll kickstart my corporation that does stuff, and, for this amount of donation, you can be a (minority) SHAREHOLDER (with no voting rights, because i either know who i'm getting in bed with, or I wear a condom)!
 
2013-09-26 11:21:39 AM  

brap: Can it with the "For $10,000 we will make YOU a minor character in Forcemeat: OperationNarnia AND send you three "Step off fraggit" lapel pins AND name our next goldfish after your mom"  and just give me some got damned points on the profits like the old got damned days when an investor was an investor and not just a got damned fanboy!



Oh, I'm sorry you thought spending money was the same thing as investing.  You won't believe this, but I've seen people pay $2000 for a brick.  Just because it will have their name on it forever in a park they cared about.  How dare the park not give them a cut of the profits for that.
 
2013-09-26 11:21:53 AM  

pute kisses like a man: gnosis301: brap: Can it with the "For $10,000 we will make YOU a minor character in Forcemeat: OperationNarnia AND send you three "Step off fraggit" lapel pins AND name our next goldfish after your mom"  and just give me some got damned points on the profits like the old got damned days when an investor was an investor and not just a got damned fanboy!

GAAAAHHHHHHHH!

Then don't invest through Kickstarter.

yeah, i feel like they should incorporate equity into the project through kickstarter, otherwise it's just charity for a gift bag.

/ perhaps I'll kickstart my corporation that does stuff, and, for this amount of donation, you can be a (minority) SHAREHOLDER (with no voting rights, because i either know who i'm getting in bed with, or I wear a condom)!


I think of it as a pre-preorder.
 
2013-09-26 11:24:42 AM  

t3knomanser: brap: and just give me some got damned points on the profits

What if their project isn't designed to generate profit? I've contributed to a lot of kickstarters that simply wanted to produce a result and not have an ongoing product for sale.


There is a difference between venture capital and crowd funding for that reason. You're basically making a donation on the promise that these guys are going to do something you want.
The game is the only "profit" in these particular kickstarter deals, and its all based on your faith in the guy running the show.

How I see it: I buy lots of games that aren't exactly what I want to play or turn out to be a bad investment (Like Assassins creed.  Wasn't bad, just wasn't for me).
I could pay for games in advance that are exactly what I'm looking for (like star citizen and Takedown).
Its a risk either way, but if I trust the staff then its a risk I'm willing to take.

/And if companies make a habit of delivering on their kickstarter promises, they stand to rake in even more money for their second and third title.
/If you think Star citizen is Epic, wait till he passes the hat around for his sequel.
 
2013-09-26 11:26:48 AM  
I don't care what you say, I would play the shiat out of Call of Duty: Assault on Disneyworld.
 
2013-09-26 11:29:07 AM  

pute kisses like a man: [cdn.steamcommunity.com image 850x189]


Greenlight is a means to acquire funding?
 
2013-09-26 11:30:36 AM  

pute kisses like a man: gnosis301: brap: Can it with the "For $10,000 we will make YOU a minor character in Forcemeat: OperationNarnia AND send you three "Step off fraggit" lapel pins AND name our next goldfish after your mom"  and just give me some got damned points on the profits like the old got damned days when an investor was an investor and not just a got damned fanboy!

GAAAAHHHHHHHH!

Then don't invest through Kickstarter.

yeah, i feel like they should incorporate equity into the project through kickstarter, otherwise it's just charity for a gift bag.

/ perhaps I'll kickstart my corporation that does stuff, and, for this amount of donation, you can be a (minority) SHAREHOLDER (with no voting rights, because i either know who i'm getting in bed with, or I wear a condom)!


Project C.A.R.S. is crowd funded and people who buy in at a certain level will share some of the profits.

The budget for the game was around $7 million.

www.wmdportal.com www.wmdportal.com
Those are all in-game photos, not "Photo Modes" like other games.

Gran Turismo's $80 million budget makes you wonder what they actually did with the money.
 
2013-09-26 11:32:55 AM  

Glitchwerks: Gran Turismo's $80 million budget makes you wonder what they actually did with the money.


Official licensing isn't cheap.
 
2013-09-26 11:33:11 AM  

brap: Can it with the "For $10,000 we will make YOU a minor character in Forcemeat: OperationNarnia AND send you three "Step off fraggit" lapel pins AND name our next goldfish after your mom"  and just give me some got damned points on the profits like the old got damned days when an investor was an investor and not just a got damned fanboy!

GAAAAHHHHHHHH!


This might be relevant to your interests.
 
2013-09-26 11:33:44 AM  

brap: Can it with the "For $10,000 we will make YOU a minor character in Forcemeat: OperationNarnia AND send you three "Step off fraggit" lapel pins AND name our next goldfish after your mom"  and just give me some got damned points on the profits like the old got damned days when an investor was an investor and not just a got damned fanboy!

GAAAAHHHHHHHH!


LOL, I didn't think anyone had figured kickstarter out yet, but looks like there is one.  Screw Kickstarter.  If your project is worth any thing at all you don't need to beg for money on the internet.  Kickstarter is basically panhandling.
 
2013-09-26 11:35:09 AM  

RedPhoenix122: I'm still letting money save up so I can contribute to Star Citizen.


Same here.  I want to donate more than just the ~$40 I'd be comfortable dumping in at one time. So I'm socking away a few dollars here and there towards a future purchase.  I've got plenty of time. It doesn't even go playable alpha for quite a while.

Also, I contributed to the Shadowrun Returns kickstarter. They sent out regular updates on what they were doing and were generally really cool and transparent about it all. And I continue to get updates about what they're working on with the game.  And I got some cool merch out of it, too.  AND the game was pretty fun.

This trend lately of early access games just takes me back to the days when I used to beta test a lot of games.  It's a really fun experience to watch a game mature and change as development progresses.  And I appreciate the ability to vote with my wallet on games I want to play.  I mean, I could before. But now I can do so earlier in the process.
 
2013-09-26 11:36:23 AM  

NicktheSmoker: brap: Can it with the "For $10,000 we will make YOU a minor character in Forcemeat: OperationNarnia AND send you three "Step off fraggit" lapel pins AND name our next goldfish after your mom"  and just give me some got damned points on the profits like the old got damned days when an investor was an investor and not just a got damned fanboy!

GAAAAHHHHHHHH!

LOL, I didn't think anyone had figured kickstarter out yet, but looks like there is one.  Screw Kickstarter.  If your project is worth any thing at all you don't need to beg for money on the internet.  Kickstarter is basically panhandling.


This is clearly the voice of someone who has never had to deal with a publisher for anything in their life.  The moment a focus group is brought to bear on a creative work, 100% of its creative value is unmade.
 
2013-09-26 11:38:00 AM  

ikanreed: This is clearly the voice of someone who has never had to deal with a publisher for anything in their life.  The moment a focus group is brought to bear on a creative work, 100% of its creative value is unmade.


This.
 
2013-09-26 11:41:43 AM  

t3knomanser: Glitchwerks: Gran Turismo's $80 million budget makes you wonder what they actually did with the money.

Official licensing isn't cheap.


PCars has most of the same licenses.  The expensive licenses are Ferrari, Porsche, and Lamborghini.  Even then, they are only around $1 million.
 
2013-09-26 11:41:55 AM  

Honest Bender: RedPhoenix122: I'm still letting money save up so I can contribute to Star Citizen.

Same here.  I want to donate more than just the ~$40 I'd be comfortable dumping in at one time. So I'm socking away a few dollars here and there towards a future purchase.  I've got plenty of time. It doesn't even go playable alpha for quite a while.

Also, I contributed to the Shadowrun Returns kickstarter. They sent out regular updates on what they were doing and were generally really cool and transparent about it all. And I continue to get updates about what they're working on with the game.  And I got some cool merch out of it, too.  AND the game was pretty fun.

This trend lately of early access games just takes me back to the days when I used to beta test a lot of games.  It's a really fun experience to watch a game mature and change as development progresses.  And I appreciate the ability to vote with my wallet on games I want to play.  I mean, I could before. But now I can do so earlier in the process.


I'll never understand early access. You are literally paying for an unfinished game, and in some cases more than it will cost at retail.
 
2013-09-26 11:43:34 AM  
If I can use an MP-9 while wearing Mickey ears? Shut up and take my money.
 
2013-09-26 11:43:37 AM  
There's only one kickstarter I'm really interested in.

wac.7725.edgecastcdn.net
 
2013-09-26 11:44:49 AM  

Barry Lyndon's Annuity Cheque: t3knomanser: Barry Lyndon's Annuity Cheque: We've gone from complaining about day-one DLC to giving money to companies for games that may or may not ever exist.

While Kickstarter is a risky venture,  getting funded places a legal obligation on the entity to complete the project. That doesn't mean that you're going to get what you contributed for, and it certainly doesn't guarantee that you'll be able to get their money back. But it's not a "this might happen if I give the money" situation. Getting funded does mean that the game  should exist.

I was under the impression that Kickstarter in no way polices that. I guess we'll see what happens when Tim Schafer fails to release his game.


You're right, Kickstarter doesn't actually police that.  However, when you create a project, you are signing a contract that you will either (a) deliver the rewards you promised in the campaign, or (b) refund all backer funds.  So, technically, somebody who fails to deliver could set themselves up for a massive class-action suit.
 
2013-09-26 11:48:20 AM  

ikanreed: Oh, I'm sorry you thought spending money was the same thing as investing.  You won't believe this, but I've seen people pay $2000 for a brick.  Just because it will have their name on it forever in a park they cared about.  How dare the park not give them a cut of the profits for that.


I was being slightly dramatic for effect but your reaction was funnier to me than you will ever know.  But for debates sake, I can write off the $2,000 I give to a park for a brick.  I can't write off the $2,000 I give a guy for making the video game Elflord's Chunky Castle.
 
2013-09-26 11:50:48 AM  

ikanreed: brap: Can it with the "For $10,000 we will make YOU a minor character in Forcemeat: OperationNarnia AND send you three "Step off fraggit" lapel pins AND name our next goldfish after your mom"  and just give me some got damned points on the profits like the old got damned days when an investor was an investor and not just a got damned fanboy!


Oh, I'm sorry you thought spending money was the same thing as investing.  You won't believe this, but I've seen people pay $2000 for a brick.  Just because it will have their name on it forever in a park they cared about.  How dare the park not give them a cut of the profits for that.



The only thing worse than giving a bunch of corporate suits a financial interest and creative voice in a project is giving thousands of random gamers financial interest and creative voice in a project.

When you Kickstart, you're saying, "Here's some money, I want to see this happen, and I want to be involved to a certain extent." You're not saying, "Here's some money. This better succeed because I want to make some money off you."

Giving backers points off the game's revenues would more or less just trade one unsuitable master for another... or, rather, a thousand others.
 
2013-09-26 11:55:24 AM  

Barry Lyndon's Annuity Cheque: I'll never understand early access. You are literally paying for an unfinished game, and in some cases more than it will cost at retail.


Let's leave price out of this for a minute since that can vary considerably from title to title and it's a subjective metric anyway.

Early access gives you the chance to play a game well before you would otherwise be able.  Let's take a popular game as an example: Kerbal Space Program.
When KSP was first playable, there wasn't a whole lot there.  There's arguably still not a whole lot there. But many people, myself included, spend hours upon hours playing the game and having a blast.  The developers are able to run their ideas by us and receive feedback, thus making the game better.

Everybody gives a little, everyone gets a little, and the entire process is made more enjoyable than it otherwise would be.

Obviously that's not going to be the experience with every title every time, but that's what we're all hoping for. That's the appeal of early access.
 
2013-09-26 12:00:00 PM  
If I were a game developer or film producer I would DEFINATELY go the Kickstarter route.  I'm just saying the fanboys (which I am completely one of) are really doing themselves/ourselves a disservice by lowering their.our expectations from "Sink or swim, I would like to be part of this" to "Sink or swim please take my money, have no real obligation to me, and use me as a Welcome mat."
 
2013-09-26 12:00:00 PM  
Mike_LowELL: ...There's really no argument that free-to-play gives you a better game.  It only gives players a less expensive game.

Without debating that (because let's face it, it's true), since the expansion of the F2P model in the West and the easing of the social stigmas attached to it ("F2P is P2W" and "F2P means failure") there's been a lot more competition in the F2P market. Demand for games is relatively inelastic given there are a finite number of gamers with diverse interests and expectation, and if there's one thing we've seen it's that the supply of games is very elastic -- F2P developers and publishers have to compete amongst each other for gamers, especially the free ones, and that means they have to create an F2P environment that has the highest value to free players (to lure them in and retain them), but remains profitable.

Granted, the market and industry haven't really reached a point of equilibrium with the F2P model yet, but it's getting there and increased competition will expedite the matter. F2P also happens to be judged frequently as a revenue model by its  worst examples (like, in today's market TOR) without regard for some of its  best (like, WoT[1] or TERA).

[1] World of Tanks gets special mention here, because it is a great example of the market-based improvement of the F2P model. It was always F2P, but the premium equipment and ammo wasn't purchasable with silver until War Thunder was announced and was about to go into beta. Knowing competition was coming down the pike, they made premium equipment purchasable with silver.
 
2013-09-26 12:01:36 PM  

brap: ikanreed: Oh, I'm sorry you thought spending money was the same thing as investing.  You won't believe this, but I've seen people pay $2000 for a brick.  Just because it will have their name on it forever in a park they cared about.  How dare the park not give them a cut of the profits for that.

I was being slightly dramatic for effect but your reaction was funnier to me than you will ever know.  But for debates sake, I can write off the $2,000 I give to a park for a brick.  I can't write off the $2,000 I give a guy for making the video game Elflord's Chunky Castle.


Yeah, writing off $2000, you can pay $600 less in taxes makes REAL business sense there, brap.  People can genuinely appreciate something and want to see it succeed without it being "charity" per se.  For example, I've seen people do the brick thing with a for-profit sports venue, too.  It was $250, not $2000, like the park, but people with money spend it on what they care about.
 
2013-09-26 12:03:48 PM  

brap: If I were a game developer or film producer I would DEFINATELY go the Kickstarter route.  I'm just saying the fanboys (which I am completely one of) are really doing themselves/ourselves a disservice by lowering their.our expectations from "Sink or swim, I would like to be part of this" to "Sink or swim please take my money, have no real obligation to me, and use me as a Welcome mat."


As opposed to spending 3x as much on the release(or just before the release) of a AAA title, and getting nothing extra for it sense the publishers, marketers, and retailers take $40 of your $60 instead.

The current model just puts loads of money into the hands of advertisers and executives.
 
2013-09-26 12:05:09 PM  

Honest Bender: Early access gives you the chance to play a game well before you would otherwise be able.  Let's take a popular game as an example: Kerbal Space Program.


KSP also had the added benefit that with early access came purchasing the game at a much cheaper price than it will be when it goes into final release.
 
2013-09-26 12:14:09 PM  
If COD is such a bad game why does it make so much money? Clearly activision is give a lot of people what they want because it's a hit every farking year.  The original COD was great. I still remember playing the last mission where you are carrying the Russian flag through Berlin. The new ones aren't much different from that once everything is said and done.  Just because we as adults have moved past those games doesn't mean that they are no longer good games.

Half the COD haters are just bad at MP and hate the game because some 13 year old called them a f****t  for taking the bomb to the wrong location that one time.  I'm pretty terrible at it myself and haven't played the newest ones but I don't hate them.  I just don't play games that don't appeal to me.

/I'm going to be digging through the 'box of PC doom' when I get home looking for my old COD disks
 
2013-09-26 12:18:30 PM  

Egoy3k: If COD is such a bad game why does it make so much money? Clearly activision is give a lot of people what they want because it's a hit every farking year.  The original COD was great. I still remember playing the last mission where you are carrying the Russian flag through Berlin. The new ones aren't much different from that once everything is said and done.  Just because we as adults have moved past those games doesn't mean that they are no longer good games.

Half the COD haters are just bad at MP and hate the game because some 13 year old called them a f****t  for taking the bomb to the wrong location that one time.  I'm pretty terrible at it myself and haven't played the newest ones but I don't hate them.  I just don't play games that don't appeal to me.

/I'm going to be digging through the 'box of PC doom' when I get home looking for my old COD disks


Why would you store the discs for Call of Duty in the DOOM game box?
 
Displayed 50 of 142 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »
On Twitter





In Other Media


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report